Clinical Trials Using Denosumab

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Denosumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Denosumab in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma with Kidney Insufficiency

    This phase II trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with multiple myeloma with kidney insufficiency. Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Denosumab in Treating Patients with ER and / or PR Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer with Bone Metastases and Detectable Circulating Tumor Cells

    The purpose of this study is to look at the amount of cancer cells in the blood of participants who are being treated with denosumab. The other purpose is to look at how long it takes for cancer to get worse when participants are being treated with denosumab. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) have been associated with shorter survival than when CTCs are absent, especially in patients whose cancer has spread to their bones. In this study, we want it see if denosumab (the study drug) will decrease the number of CTCs measured in patients with MBC and cancer that has spread to their bones. We also plan to get blood from participants to study other research markers of interest.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Denosumab in Treating Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase 0 trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with invasive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride, Hormone Therapy, and Denosumab in Treating Patients with Hormone-Positive, Bone-Dominant Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy, and denosumab work in treating patients with hormone-positive breast cancer that has spread from the primary site to the bones and / or bone marrow (bone-dominant metastatic). Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to bone-dominant metastatic breast cancer and not harm normal cells. Hormones can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Drugs, such as anastrozole, exemestane, fulvestrant, letrozole, and tamoxifen citrate, may lessen the amount of hormones made by the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy, and denosumab may help to control breast cancer that has spread to the bones and / or bone marrow.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Denosumab in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer and Bone Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to the bone by testing whether it helps lower the number of tumor cells in patients before and after treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may find tumor cells in the bone and interfere with the ability of the cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Anakinra or Denosumab and Everolimus in Advanced Cancer

    You are being asked to take part in this study because you have advanced cancer that has either gotten worse or is resistant to standard therapy. The goal of this clinical research study is to find the highest tolerable dose of the combination of Afinitor (everolimus) either with Kineret (anakinra) or Xgeva (denosumab) that can be given to patients with advanced cancer. The safety of these drugs will also be studied. Everolimus is designed to stop cells from dividing. Anakinra is designated to block a protein that is involved in tumor development, new blood vessels growing, and spread of cancer. Denosumab is designed to block the activity of a protein, which may prevent bone complications in cancer that has spread to the bone. This is an investigational study. Everolimus is FDA approved and commercially available to treat pancreatic cancer that has gotten worse, advanced renal cell carcinoma, and a type of brain tumor called subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Anakinra is FDA approved and commercially available for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Denosumab is FDA approved and commercially available to prevent bone problems in patients with solid tumors that have spread to the bone. The combination of everolimus either with anakinra or denosumab to treat advanced cancer is investigational. Up to 147 patients will take part in this study. All will be enrolled at MD Anderson.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Denosumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: 133 locations