Clinical Trials Using Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 28
1 2 Next >

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 158 locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients with Down Syndrome

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.
    Location: 141 locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 Versus Salvage Chemotherapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT3) Mutation

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit of ASP2215 therapy in patients with FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to or have relapsed after first-line AML therapy as shown with overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy, and to determine the efficacy of ASP2215 therapy as assessed by the rate of complete remission and complete remission with partial hematological recovery (CR / CRh) in these patients. This study will also determine the overall efficacy in event-free survival (EFS) and complete remission (CR) rate of ASP2215 compared to salvage chemotherapy.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Bortezomib, Vorinostat, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with bortezomib and combination chemotherapy in treating infants (patients less than 1 year old) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, hydrocortisone, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with bortezomib and vorinostat may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Safety Study of AG-120 or AG-221 in Combination With Induction and Consolidation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia With an IDH1 and / or IDH2 Mutation

    The purpose of this Phase I, multicenter, clinical trial is to evaluate the safety of AG-120 and AG-221 when given in combination with standard AML induction and consolidation therapy. The study plans to evaluate 1 dose level of AG-120 in subjects with an IDH1 mutation and 1 dose level of AG-221 in subjects with an IDH2 mutation. AG-120 or AG-221 will be administered with 2 types of AML induction therapies (cytarabine with either daunorubicin or idarubicin) and 2 types of AML consolidation therapies (mitoxantrone with etoposide [ME] or cytarabine). After consolidation therapy, subjects may continue on to maintenance therapy and receive daily treatment of AG-120 or AG-221 for up to 2 years from Day 1 of the first induction cycle, or until relapse, development of an unacceptable toxicity, or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT).
    Location: 13 locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Open-Label Study of Guadecitabine vs Treatment Choice in Previously Treated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study of guadecitabine vs treatment choice (TC). Subjects will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either guadecitabine or TC. TC options include the 8 high or low intensity, locally available regimens below; or Best supportive Care (BSC) alone: - High intensity (intermediate or high dose cytarabine [HiDAC]; mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine [MEC]; or fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor [G-CSF], + / - idarubicin [FLAG / FLAG-Ida]). - Low intensity (low dose cytarabine [LDAC], decitabine, or azacitidine). - BSC.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Alvocidib Biomarker-driven Phase 2 AML Study

    The purpose of this two-stage Phase 2 study is to assess the clinical response (Complete Remission) to FLAM compared to AM treatment in refractory or relapsed AML patients with demonstrated NOXA BH3 priming of ≥ 40% by mitochondrial profiling in bone marrow.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Study of Carfilzomib in Combination With Induction Chemotherapy in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    The purpose of the study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose and assess the safety, tolerability and activity of carfilzomib, alone and in combination with induction chemotherapy, in children with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of brentuximab vedotin when given together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving brentuximab vedotin together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Risk-Directed Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well risk directed therapy works in treating younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned or does not responded to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Higher or Lower Dose Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Medically Less Fit Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Neoplasm

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well higher or lower dose cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone work in treating medically less fit patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid neoplasm. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone at higher or lower dose may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Decitabine, Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine when given together with filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or has not responded to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Decitabine, filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Early Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This clinical trial studies how well early stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Early stem cell transplantation may result in more successful treatment for patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone with Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed, Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]), cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, when given together with sorafenib tosylate and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (likely to be more aggressive). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride together with sorafenib tosylate may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Etoposide, and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine when given together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride and etoposide in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement. Hydroxychloroquine may increase the effectiveness of mitoxantrone hydrochloride and etoposide. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving hydroxychloroquine with mitoxantrone hydrochloride and etoposide may work better in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Pilot Study of Crenolanib Combined With Standard Salvage Chemotherapy in Subjects With R / R AML

    The proposed study is designed to combine crenolanib with standard salvage chemotherapy to treat patients with R / R AML irrespective the FLT3 status.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Biomarkers in Predicting Treatment Response to Sirolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Patients with High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies whether biomarkers (biological molecules) in bone marrow samples can predict treatment response to sirolimus and combination chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is likely to come back or spread (high-risk). Sirolimus inhibits or blocks the pathway that causes cancer cells to grow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adding sirolimus to combination chemotherapy may help improve patient response. Studying samples of bone marrow from patients treated with sirolimus in the laboratory may help doctors learn whether sirolimus reverses or turns off that pathway and whether changes in biomarker levels can predict how well patients will respond to treatment.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Selinexor with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of selinexor when give together with standard chemotherapy, high dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Selinexor may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving selinexor together with standard chemotherapy may be a better treatment for patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Panobinostat, Bortezomib, and Vincristine Sulfate Liposome with Re-induction Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome and re-induction therapy (strong chemotherapy) work in treating younger patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Panobinostat and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, pegaspargase, dexamethasone, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate liposome, methotrexate, mercaptopurine, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome together with re-induction therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Granulocytic Sarcoma

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well CPI-613 (6,8-bis[benzylthio]octanoic acid), cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or granulocytic sarcoma (a malignant, green-colored tumor of myeloid cells [a type of immature white blood cell]) that has returned (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). 6,8-bis(benzylthio)octanoic acid is thought to kill cancer cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by cancer cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more cancer cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, 6,8-bis(benzylthio)octanoic acid deprives the cancer cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving 6,8-bis(benzylthio)octanoic acid together with cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with etoposide with or without mitoxantrone hydrochloride and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Selinexor may help stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking an enzyme needed for cancer cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy together with selinexor may work better in treating relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed / Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of mitoxantrone hydrochloride when given together with filgrastim, cladribine, and cytarabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes that is newly diagnosed, has returned, or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of lenalidomide when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of acute myeloid leukemia by blocking blood flow to the cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenalidomide and combination chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California


1 2 Next >