Clinical Trials Using Ofatumumab

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Ofatumumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-10 of 10
  • Ofatumumab in Combination with Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Dexamethasone Alternating with Ofatumumab in Combination with Cytarabine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ofatumumab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone alternating with ofatumumab in combination with cytarabine and methotrexate works in treating patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, dexamethasone, cytarabine, and methotrexate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ofatumumab together with alternating regimens of combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dose Adjusted EPOCH Regimen in Combination with Ofatumumab or Rituximab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well a dose adjusted regimen consisting of etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (EPOCH) works in combination with ofatumumab or rituximab in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed), or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ofatumumab and Fresh Frozen Plasma in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies ofatumumab and fresh frozen plasma in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has returned (relapsed) or did not respond to the previous treatment (refractory). Ofatumumab is designed to seek out and lock onto a receptor found on B cells in the body. This receptor is on some normal B cells and also on B cells that are cancerous. By attaching to the cells, ofatumumab tags the cells for destruction by the body's immune system. Giving fresh frozen plasma may help ofatumumab work better by helping the immune system kill the cancer cells.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Ofatumumab, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine hydrochloride when given together with ofatumumab, carboplatin, and etoposide and to see how well they work in treating patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Etoposide may also stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving bendamustine hydrochloride, ofatumumab, carboplatin, and etoposide together may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ofatumumab with or without Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Mantel Cell Lymphoma That Are Ineligible for Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies ofatumumab with or without bendamustine hydrochloride in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) that are ineligible for stem cell transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether ofatumumab is more effective when given together with or without bendamustine hydrochloride in treating patients with MCL.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Ofatumumab in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and ofatumumab work in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab, may block cancer growth by blocking the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy together with ofatumumab may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Alemtuzumab and Ofatumumab in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well giving alemtuzumab and ofatumumab together works in treating patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Monoclonal antibodies, such as alemtuzumab and ofatumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Phase 3 Extension Study of Duvelisib and Ofatumumab in Patients With CLL / SLL Previously Enrolled in Study IPI-145-07

    A Phase 3 (extension) clinical trial to examine the efficacy of IPI-145 monotherapy or ofatumumab monotherapy in subjects with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL) who experienced disease progression after treatment with IPI-145 or Ofatumumab in Study IPI-145-07.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Idelalisib and Ofatumumab in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well giving idelalisib and ofatumumab together works in treating patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma who have not received any previous treatment. Idelalisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab, may find cancer cells by identifying a protein on the surface of the cells and help kill them. Giving idelalisib and ofatumumab together may help stop the growth of disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma.
    Location: 4 locations