Clinical Trials Using Elotuzumab

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Elotuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-11 of 11
  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Pomalidomide may enhance or suppress the reaction of the immune system to a stimulus which may help the body destroy cancer cells. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Dexamethasone may act against cancer cells and prevent inflammation in a wide variety of organs. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Eotuzumab with or without Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Relapsed Primary Amyloidosis

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and eotuzumab with or without cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with primary amyloidosis that has come back after a period of improvement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as eotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and eotuzumab with cyclophosphamide may work better in treating patients with primary amyloidosis.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan

  • Donor Nicotinamide Expanded-Natural Killer Cells Followed by IL-2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or CD20 Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of donor nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 in treating patients with multiple myeloma or CD20 positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells may improve the natural killer cell cancer killing ability and improve their ability to home into the tumor cells. Interleukins such as IL-2, are proteins made by white blood cells and other cells in the body and may help regulate immune response. Giving nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Elotuzumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low Dose Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low dose dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Elotuzumab, Stem Cell Transplantation, Lenalidomide, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of elotuzumab, stem cell transplantation, lenalidomide, and melphalan in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy, such as melphalan, is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy such as lenalidomide is given after the stem cell transplant to keep the cancer from coming back. Giving elotuzumab, stem cell transplantation, lenalidomide, and melphalan together may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Elotuzumab and Lenalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab works when given with lenalidomide as maintenance therapy after transplant in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who underwent transplant using their own stem cells (autologous transplant). Maintenance therapy is treatment that is given to help keep cancer from coming back after it has disappeared following the initial treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may find cancer cells and cause the immune system to attack and kill them. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Adding elotuzumab to standard maintenance therapy with lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma who have undergone transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Natural Killer Cells, High Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of umbilical cord blood-derived natural killer cells when given together with high dose chemotherapy before autologous stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving natural killer cells from donor umbilical cord blood before transplant may also kill myeloma cells that remain in the body after the last chemotherapy treatment. After treatment, stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Second Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment who are undergoing a second stem cell transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Bortezomib, Dexamethasone, and Lenalidomide with or without Elotuzumab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This partially randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of elotuzumab and to see how well it works when given together with lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma that is likely to recur (come back), or spread (high-risk). Lenalidomide and bortezomib may stop the growth of multiple myeloma by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Also, bortezomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, also work in different ways to kill cancer cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab together with lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone may be a better way to block cancer growth.
    Location: 417 locations

  • Continuing Treatment for Subjects Who Have Participated in a Prior Protocol Investigating Elotuzumab

    The purpose of this study is to continue to provide elotuzumab and / or other study drugs to subjects who have participated on a prior protocol investigating elotuzumab who are not able to receive commercial drug supply.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Expanded Access Treatment Protocol CA204-143

    The objective of this expanded access program is to provide treatment with elotuzumab in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma at U.S. sites where licensed physicians determine clinical need.
    Location: 4 locations