Clinical Trials Using Pomalidomide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pomalidomide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-23 of 23
  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Pomalidomide may enhance or suppress the reaction of the immune system to a stimulus which may help the body destroy cancer cells. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Dexamethasone may act against cancer cells and prevent inflammation in a wide variety of organs. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • SL-401 in Combination With Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Relapsed or Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    A Phase 1 / 2, Open Label Study of SL-401 in Combination with Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone In Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Study of JNJ-54767414 (HuMax CD38) (Anti-CD38 Monoclonal Antibody) in Combination With Backbone Treatments for the Treatment of Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and dose regimen of daratumumab when administered in combination with various treatment regimens for the treatment of multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Phase 1b Study Evaluating OPomD in Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    A study evaluating two new formulations of oprozomib plus pomalidomide and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Study of Ibrutinib in Combination With Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Phase 1 will be an open-label, dose finding, multicenter study of ibrutinib in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in subjects with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma. Phase 2b will be conducted as a randomized, double-blind, multicenter study of ibrutinib or placebo, in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in subjects with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB052793, Given to Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    This is a study of INCB052793 given to patients with advanced malignancies that will be conducted in three phases; Phase 1a (Monotherapy) and Phase 1b (Combination Therapy) and Phase 2 (Combination therapy of INCB052793 with azacitidine and itacitinib with azacitidine). Phase 1 will have two parts; a dose escalation (Part 1) and an expansion (Part 2).
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-dose Dexamethasone or Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-dose Dexamethasone and Daratumumab in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Following Lenalidomide-based Therapy in the First or Second Line Setting

    This trial will evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination of pomalidomide (POM) and low-dose dexamethasone (LD-Dex) (Cohort A) or the combination of pomalidomide (POM) , daratumumab (DARA) and low-dose dexamethasone (LD-Dex) (Cohort B) in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received a first or second line treatment of lenalidomide-based therapy. This trial will test the hypothesis for Cohort A that the proportion of patients will have an Overall Response Rate (ORR) of > 30 % to reveal that Pomalidomide is efficacious in pretreated patients who are refractory to lenalidomide. This trial will test the hypothesis for Cohort B that the proportion of patients will have an Overall Response Rate (ORR) of > 70 % to reveal that POM+DARA+LD-Dex is efficacious in pretreated patients who are refractory to lenalidomide.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Sotatercept, Lenalidomide or Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of sotatercept when given together with lenalidomide or pomalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Biological therapies, such as sotatercept, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Giving sotatercept together with lenalidomide or pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may also improve anemia (low blood levels of hemoglobin) and bone lesions that may occur in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Selinexor and Backbone Treatments of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    This study will independently assess the efficacy and safety of four combination therapies for the treatment of patients with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma (RR MM): selinexor + pomalidomide + dexamethasone (SPd), selinexor + bortezomib + dexamethasone (SVd), selinexor + lenalidomide+ dexamethasone (SRd), and selinexor + daratumumab + dexamethasone (SDd). The abbreviations for combination treatments have been revised to use V (Velcade) for bortezomib and R (Revlimid) for lenalidomide.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pomalidomide after Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pomalidomide after combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, daunorubicin hydrochloride, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pomalidomide may kill cancer cells by stopping blood flow to the cancer and by stimulating white blood cells to kill cancer cells. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pomalidomide may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Safety and Efficacy Study of Carfilzomib and Pomalidomide With Dexamethasone in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This is a dose finding pilot study to evaluate the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose of the combination of carfilzomib and pomalidomide with dexamethasone (CPD) in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma followed by a phase II expansion at the MTD to evaluate efficacy.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pomalidomide, Ixazomib Citrate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Previously Treated Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well pomalidomide, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with previously treated multiple myeloma or plasma cell leukemia. Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pomalidomide, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone together may be more effective in treating multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ixazomib Citrate with Pomalidomide, Clarithromycin and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of clarithromycin when given together with ixazomib citrate, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone and to see how well it works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has not responded to previous treatment. Biological therapies, such as clarithromycin, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving clarithromycin with ixazomib citrate, pomalidomide and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib and to see how well it works when given together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Pomalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Ixazomib Citrate, Pomalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well ixazomib citrate, pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving ixazomib citrate in addition to pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Pomalidomide and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Advanced or Refractory Kaposi Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pomalidomide when given together with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with Kaposi sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body or that does not respond to treatment. Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pomalidomide and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with Kaposi sarcoma.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine hydrochloride and pomalidomide when given together with dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Giving bendamustine hydrochloride and pomalidomide together with dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Pomalidomide in Treating Patients with Kaposi Sarcoma with or without HIV

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of pomalidomide and to see how well it works in treating patients with Kaposi sarcoma with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing and may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Second Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment who are undergoing a second stem cell transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Study of Pomalidomide and Low Dose Dexamethasone With or Without Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Refractory or Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (rrMM) (MK-3475-183 / KEYNOTE-183)

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of pomalidomide and low dose dexamethasone with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) to that of pomalidomide and low dose dexamethasone without pembrolizumab in terms of Progression-Free Survival (PFS) in participants with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (rrMM) who have undergone at least 2 lines of prior treatment.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone with or without Ixazomib in Treating Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of pomalidomide and ixazomib when given together with dexamethasone and to see how well pomalidomide and dexamethasone with or without ixazomib works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment. Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether pomalidomide and dexamethasone are more effective with or without ixazomib in treating multiple myeloma.
    Location: 275 locations

  • HDAC Inhibitor AR-42 and Pomalidomide in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor AR-42 (AR-42) when given together with pomalidomide in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement. HDAC inhibitor AR-42 may work to stop cancer growth by blocking an enzyme needed for cell growth. Pomalidomide is a drug used in chemotherapy that works to stop the growth of cancer cells by causing them to die. Giving HDAC inhibitor AR-42 together with pomalidomide may cause patients to respond better to treatment.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pomalidomide when given together with dexamethasone in treating patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or intraocular lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, relapsed or refractory. Pomalidomide may stimulate the immune system to kill cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pomalidomide together with dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 7 locations