Clinical Trials Using Regorafenib

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Regorafenib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-20 of 20
  • SARC024: A Blanket Protocol to Study Oral Regorafenib in Patients With Refractory Liposarcoma, Osteogenic Sarcoma, and Ewing Sarcomas

    Although regorafenib was approved for use in patients who had progressive GIST despite imatinib and / or sunitinib on the basis of phase II and phase III data, it has not been examined in a systematic fashion in patients with other forms of sarcoma. Given the activity of sorafenib, sunitinib and pazopanib in soft tissue sarcomas, and evidence of activity of sorafenib in osteogenic sarcoma and possibly Ewing / Ewing-like sarcoma, there is precedent to examine SMOKIs (small molecule oral kinase inhibitors) such as regorafenib in sarcomas other than GIST. It is also recognized that SMOKIs (small molecule oral kinase inhibitors)such as regorafenib, sorafenib, pazopanib, and sunitinib have overlapping panels of kinases that are inhibited simultaneously. While not equivalent, most of these SMOKIs (small molecule oral kinase inhibitors) block vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet derived growth factors receptors (VEGFRs and PDGFRs), speaking to a common mechanism of action of several of these agents.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Previously Treated, Metastatic, or Locally Advanced Angiosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies regorafenib in treating patients with previously treated angiosarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Guadecitabine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride or Regorafenib or TAS-102 Alone in Treating Patients with Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This partially randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of guadecitabine and to see how well it works when given together with irinotecan hydrochloride or regorafenib or trifluridine / tipiracil hydrochloride combination agent TAS-102 (Tas-102) alone in treating patients with previously treated colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Guadecitabine, irinotecan hydrochloride, regorafenib, and TAS-102 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • TAPUR: Testing the Use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved Drugs That Target a Specific Abnormality in a Tumor Gene in People With Advanced Stage Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to learn from the real world practice of prescribing targeted therapies to patients with advanced cancer whose tumor harbors a genomic variant known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug. NOTE: Due to character limits, the arms section does NOT include all TAPUR Study relevant biomarkers. For additional information, contact TAPUR@asco.org, or if a patient, your nearest participating TAPUR site (see participating centers).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works in treating patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Regorafenib Following Completion of Standard Chemotherapy for Patients With Colon Cancer

    This study is a randomized, double-blind, post-chemotherapy, adjuvant phase III clinical trial. The primary aim of this study is to determine the value of regorafenib in improving disease-free survival (DFS). Patients with Stage III (IIIB or IIIC) colon cancer as defined by the 7th Edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual are randomized 1:1 to placebo or the experimental agent regorafenib following completion of at least four months of standard adjuvant therapy (e.g., 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) , capecitabine, oxaliplatin (CapeOx), and other).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works in treating patients with medullary thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Efficacy of Ginseng for Patients on Regorafenib

    This is a randomized, multi-center phase II study of ginseng in colorectal cancer patients treated with regorafenib to determine if ginseng will reduce fatigue in this patient population and improve adherence to regorafenib. Ninety (90) subjects will be enrolled and randomized using a 2:1 allocation, with 60 subjects enrolled in the regorafenib + ginseng group and 30 enrolled in the regorafenib + no ginseng group.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Regorafenib in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to measure high grade (3-5) toxicity of regorafenib and to monitor the impact of treatment with regorafenib on the quality of life in older adults with metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Advanced Urothelial Cancer After Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled after chemotherapy. Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Biomarkers in Predicting Response to Regorafenib in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies blood and tissue samples to identify biomarkers that may predict response to regorafenib in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Regorafenib may cause side effects and may not work well in some patients. Studying samples of blood and tissue in the laboratory may help doctors find markers that can identify patients that will respond better to treatment and learn more about how regorafenib works.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Regorafenib, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Treating Patients with Metastatic and Refractory Colorectal Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well regorafenib, fluorouracil, and leucovorin work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as regorafenib, fluorouracil, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory, Advanced Myeloid Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of regorafenib in treating patients with myeloid malignancies that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Regorafenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts

  • Regorafenib and Sildenafil Citrate in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of regorafenib and sildenafil citrate in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Regorafenib and sildenafil citrate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving regorafenib with sildenafil citrate may work better in treating patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Vorinostat and Hydroxychloroquine or Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vorinostat and hydroxychloroquine work compared with regorafenib in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment. Vorinostat and regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hydroxychloroquine may suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing or kill them. It is not yet known whether vorinostat and hydroxychloroquine work better than regorafenib in treating patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract Cancer Who Failed First-Line Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works in treating patients with biliary tract cancer that has spread to other places in the body who failed first-line chemotherapy. Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • An Open-Label Study to Enable Continued Treatment Access for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Studies of Ruxolitinib

    The purpose of this study is to provide continued supply of ruxolitinib alone, ruxolitinib plus background cancer therapy, or background cancer therapy alone to subjects from an Incyte-sponsored study of ruxolitinib that has reached its study objectives or has been terminated. This study will also provide another mechanism for reporting adverse events related to study drug safety.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    This phase II trial studies regorafenib in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body. Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Sunitinib Malate Alternating with Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Gastrointestinal Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of sunitinib malate and regorafenib in treating patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, or tumors that begin in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract, that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Sunitinib malate and regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by each blocking a separate enzyme needed for tumors to grow. Alternating sunitinib malate with regorafenib may help the drugs block tumor growth for a longer period of time.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Capmatinib, Ceritinib, Regorafenib, or Entrectinib in Treating Patients with BRAF / NRAS Wild-Type Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well capmatinib, ceritinib, regorafenib, or entrectinib work in treating patients with BRAF / NRAS wild-type stage III-IV melanoma. Capmatinib, ceritinib, regorafenib, or entrectinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California