Clinical Trials Using Adavosertib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Adavosertib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-18 of 18
  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1174 locations

  • Adavosertib and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating younger patients with solid tumors that have come back or that have not responded to standard therapy. Adavosertib and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 22 locations

  • Adavosertib in Treating Patients with SETD2-Deficient Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well adavosertib works in treating patients with SETD2-deficient solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 16 locations

  • Adavosertib and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Children with Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of adavosertib when given together with local radiation therapy in treating children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons, or other sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving adavosertib with local radiation therapy may work better than local radiation therapy alone in treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.
    Location: 22 locations

  • Adavosertib, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Cervical, Vaginal, or Uterine Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with external beam radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, external beam radiation therapy, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • AZD1775 in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors with CCNE1 Amplification

    This phase II trial studies how well AZD1775 works in treating patients with solid tumors with CCNE1 amplification that have spread to other places in the body and do not respond to treatment. AZD1775 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Molecular Profiling-Based Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies molecular profiling-based targeted therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Adavosertib, everolimus, and trametinib are drugs that each target a specific variation in tumors by blocking different proteins needed for cell growth. Veliparib blocks an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaged by chemotherapy, which may help chemotherapy drugs work better. It is not yet known whether testing patients for variations in their tumor and assigning treatment targeting the variation is more effective than standard non-targeted therapy in treating advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Olaparib with and without AZD1775, AZD5363, and AZD2014 in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works with and without other targeted therapies in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Olaparib, WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 (AZD1775), Akt serine / threonine-specific protein kinase (Akt) inhibitor AZD5363 (AZD5363), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) kinase inhibitor AZD2014 (AZD2014) may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and repair. It is not yet known if giving olaparib alone or in combination with AZD1775, AZD5363, or AZD2014 will work better in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Cisplatin and Adavosertib in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well cisplatin and adavosertib work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or other places in the body. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving cisplatin and adavosertib together may work better in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Adavosertib, Radiation Therapy, and Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with radiation therapy and temozolomide in treating patients with glioblastoma that is newly diagnosed or has come back. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, radiation therapy, and temozolomide may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma compared to radiation therapy and temozolomide alone.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Adavosertib in Treating Patients with Recurrent Uterine Serous Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well adavosertib works in treating patients with uterine serous carcinoma that has come back. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Open-Label, Randomised, Multi-Drug, Biomarker-Directed, Phase 1b Study in Pts w / Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This is an open label, multi-drug, biomarker-directed, multi-centre, multi-arm, Phase 1b study in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) (urothelial) who have progressed on prior treatment. This study is modular in design, allowing evaluation of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumour activity of multiple agents as monotherapy and as combinations of different novel anti-cancer agents. The study will consist of a number of study modules (sub-studies), each evaluating the safety and tolerability of a specific agent or combination.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Adavosertib with or without Olaparib in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well adavosertib with or without olaparib work in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back. Adavosertib and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • To Assess Safety and Efficacy of Agents Targeting DNA Damage Repair With Olaparib Versus Olaparib Monotherapy.

    This study is to assess the efficacy and safety of olaparib monotherapy versus olaparib in combination with an inhibitor of ATR (Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related protein kinase (AZD6738) and olaparib monotherapy versus olaparib in combination with an inhibitor of WEE1 (AZD1775) in second or third line setting in patients with Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) prospectively stratified by presence / absence of qualifying tumour mutation in genes involved in the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Treatment arms are olaparib monotherapy, olaparib+AZD6738 and olaparib+AZD1775. The study subject population will be divided into Stratum A, Stratum B, and Stratum C. Due to the different schedules of administration of each of the treatment options as well as their different toxicity profiles, the study is not blinded. Study has two stage consent process- stage 1 consent (molecular screening for HRR defects) and stage 2 consent (main study). Patients with TNBC and with known qualifying BRCAm, non BRCAm HRRm and non HRRm status will be offered the option of consenting to the main part of the study within the 28-day screening period. Approximately 450 patients will be randomised (using randomisation ratio 1:1:1) to 3 treatment arms.
    Location: 2 locations

  • AZD1775 Continued Access Study to Assess Safety and Tolerability for Patients Enrolled in AZD1775 Clinical Pharmacology Studies

    Open-label, non-randomised study to provide continued access to AZD1775 for patients with advanced solid tumours who have previously completed an AZD1775 clinical pharmacology study and to investigate the safety of AZD1775.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • Adavosertib with Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Intermediate or High Risk Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib with radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with intermediate or high risk head and neck cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib together with radiation therapy and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • A Phase II Trial of AZD1775 plus Carboplatin-Paclitaxel in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775, carboplatin, and paclitaxel work in treating patients with squamous cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced), or has come back (recurrent). WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 together with carboplatin and paclitaxel may be an effective treatment for squamous cell lung cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Adavosertib before Surgery in Treating Patients with Advanced High Grade Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies how adavosertib affects the tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of patients undergoing surgery for high grade (fast growing or aggressive) ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Certain characteristics in the DNA of these patients may affect how well they respond to treatment. Learning how adavosertib affects DNA in tumor cells may help doctors plan effective treatment.
    Location: 7 locations