Clinical Trials Using Arsenic Trioxide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Arsenic Trioxide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide with or without Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well tretinoin and arsenic trioxide with or without gemtuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with previously untreated acute promyelocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as tretinoin and arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called ozogamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving tretinoin and arsenic trioxide together with gemtuzumab ozogamicin may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Arsenic Trioxide and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cyclophosphamide when given together with arsenic trioxide in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Treating Patients with Advanced Basal Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well arsenic trioxide and itraconazole work in treating patients with basal cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Itraconazole may help treat fungal infections in patients with basal cell cancer. Giving arsenic trioxide with itraconazole may work better in treating basal cell cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well arsenic trioxide works in treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California