Clinical Trials Using Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • A Study to Investigate Blinatumomab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.
    Location: 195 locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients with Down Syndrome

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.
    Location: 164 locations

  • A Study to Compare Standard Chemotherapy to Therapy with CPX-351 and / or Gilteritinib for Patients with Newly Diagnosed AML with or without FLT3 Mutations

    This phase III trial compares standard chemotherapy to therapy with CPX-351 and / or gilteritinib for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia with or without FLT3 mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin, cytarabine, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. CPX-351 is made up of daunorubicin and cytarabine and is made in a way that makes the drugs stay in the bone marrow longer and could be less likely to cause heart problems than traditional anthracycline drugs, a common class of chemotherapy drug. Some acute myeloid leukemia patients have an abnormality in the structure of a gene called FLT3. Genes are pieces of DNA (molecules that carry instructions for development, functioning, growth and reproduction) inside each cell that tell the cell what to do and when to grow and divide. FLT3 plays an important role in the normal making of blood cells. This gene can have permanent changes that cause it to function abnormally by making cancer cells grow. Gilteritinib may block the abnormal function of the FLT3 gene that makes cancer cells grow. The overall goals of this study are, 1) to compare the effects, good and / or bad, of CPX-351 with daunorubicin and cytarabine on people with newly diagnosed AML to find out which is better, 2) to study the effects, good and / or bad, of adding gilteritinib to AML therapy for patients with high amounts of FLT3 / ITD or other FLT3 mutations and 3) to study changes in heart function during and after treatment for AML. Giving CPX-351 and / or gilteritinib with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to standard chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 167 locations

  • A Phase 2 Study of Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.
    Location: 42 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine or decitabine before usual chemotherapy may change the genetics of the leukemia cell by priming it to be more sensitive to the chemotherapy that will follow in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Isatuximab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Primary Objective: To evaluate the anti-leukemic activity of isatuximab in combination with standard chemotherapies in pediatric participants of ages 28 days to less than 18 years with Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Secondary Objectives: - Safety and tolerability assessments - Assessment of infusion reactions (IRs) - Pharmacokinetics (PK) of isatuximab - Minimal residual disease - Overall response rate - Overall survival - Event free survival - Duration of response - Relationship between clinical effects and CD38 receptor density and occupancy
    Location: 2 locations

  • Modified Chemotherapy Regimen and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Pediatric Patients

    This phase I trial studies how well a modified chemotherapy regimen with gemtuzumab ozogamicin works for the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in pediatric patients. The current standard of care to treat most pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia is 5 cycles of chemotherapy. Adjusting treatment with a 4-cycle treatment regimen may provide the same treatment results and decrease the amount of side effects experienced during treatment. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Giving gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the 4-cycle treatment regimen may also reduce the chances of acute myeloid leukemia coming back after initial treatment.
    Location: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta - Egleston, Atlanta, Georgia