Clinical Trials Using Aspirin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Aspirin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Aspirin in Preventing Recurrence of Cancer in Patients with Node Positive or High Risk Node Negative, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer after Chemotherapy, Surgery, and / or Radiation Therapy

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing the cancer from coming back (recurrence) in patients with node positive or high risk node negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative breast cancer after chemotherapy, surgery, and / or radiation therapy. Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is also being studied in cancer prevention. Giving aspirin may reduce the rate of cancer recurrence in patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 1297 locations

  • Aspirin and Rintatolimod with or without Interferon-alpha 2b in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer Before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well aspirin and rintatolimod with or without interferon-alpha 2b work in treating patients with prostate cancer before surgery. Aspirin may help to keep the prostate cancer from coming back. Rintatolimod may stimulate the immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Interferon-alpha 2b may improve the body’s natural response to infections and may slow tumor growth. It is not yet known how well rintatolimod, aspirin, and interferon-alpha 2b work in treating patients with prostate cancer undergoing surgery.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pembrolizumab, Ipilimumab, and Aspirin in Treating Patients with Melanoma That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, ipilimumab, and aspirin work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Aspirin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab, ipilimumab, and aspirin may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Pembrolizumab, Aspirin, and Clopidogrel Bisulfate in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This randomized phase I trial studies how well pembrolizumab, aspirin, and clopidogrel bisulfate work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back or that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Aspirin and clopidogrel bisulfate are a type of drug called anti-platelets that help prevent blood clots. Giving pembrolizumab, aspirin, and clopidogrel bisulfate together may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Low-Dose Aspirin in Decreasing Inflammation in Patients Undergoing Gynecologic Surgery

    This early phase I trial studies how well low-dose aspirin works in decreasing inflammation in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery that includes removal of their fallopian tube. Fallopian tube is a slender tube through which eggs pass from an ovary to the uterus. Low-dose aspirin may decrease inflammation in the fallopian tubes and may provide new information on ovarian cancer prevention that could benefit other patients in the future.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Aspirin as an Ultraviolet Protectant for the Prevention of Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing ultraviolet skin sensitivity and mole damage in patients who have moles and potentially other risk factors for melanoma. Aspirin is a commonly used over-the-counter medicine that is a type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that may affect other molecules in the skin and moles that relate to melanoma development.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Aspirin in Preventing Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Colorectal Adenoma

    This phase IIa trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal adenoma. Aspirin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee