Clinical Trials Using Atezolizumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Atezolizumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 133
1 2 3 ... 6 Next >

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride with Atezolizumab and / or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase II / III trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride with atezolizumab and / or bevacizumab work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back (recurrent). Chemotherapy drugs, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known which combination will work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: 831 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.
    Location: 914 locations

  • Testing the Drug Atezolizumab or Placebo with Usual Therapy in First-Line HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 559 locations

  • Testing Maintenance Therapy for Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients with SLFN11 Positive Biomarker

    This phase II trial studies whether atezolizumab in combination with talazoparib works better than atezolizumab alone as maintenance therapy for patients with SLFN11-positive extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PARPs are proteins that help repair damage to DNA, the genetic material that serves as the body’s instruction book. Changes (mutations) in DNA can cause tumor cells to grow quickly and out of control, but PARP inhibitors like talazoparib may keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can’t repair themselves, and they stop growing. Giving atezolizumab in combination with talazoparib may help lower the chance of extensive-stage small cell lung cancer growing and spreading compared to atezolizumab alone.
    Location: 428 locations

  • Chemoradiation with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II / III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation) with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemoradiation with or without atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 412 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and / or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, the COMMIT Study

    This phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and / or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may stop or slow colorectal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 377 locations

  • Chemoradiotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.
    Location: 231 locations

  • Trying to Find the Correct Length of Treatment with Immune Checkpoint Therapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

    This phase III trial compares survival in urothelial cancer patients who stop immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment after being treated for about a year to those patients who continue treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, durvalumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stopping the treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors early in patients who have been responding to such therapy for approximately 1 year, may not change the benefit of treatment. This is because their immune system may continue to attack the tumor cells even if the treatment has stopped. A possible reason may be that the immune system has memory and remembers what it sees, including the cancer cells that it attacks. Stopping treatment with checkpoint inhibitors early may result in similar survival rate as if the treatment had not stopped and may also lead to fewer treatment-related side effects, an improvement in mental health, and a lower cost burden to patients.
    Location: 209 locations

  • Testing Docetaxel-Cetuximab or the Addition of an Immunotherapy drug, Atezolizumab, to the Usual Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase II / III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin, docetaxel, cetuximab, and / or atezolizumab after surgery in treating patients with high-risk stage III-IV head and neck cancer the begins in the thin, flat cells (squamous cell). Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to compare the usual treatment (radiation therapy with cisplatin chemotherapy) to using radiation therapy with docetaxel and cetuximab chemotherapy, and using the usual treatment plus an immunotherapy drug, atezolizumab.
    Location: 218 locations

  • Testing the Addition of the Drug Atezolizumab to the Usual Radiation Treatment for Patients with Early Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This trial studies how well atezolizumab added to the usual radiation therapy works in treating patients with stage I-IIA non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy, such as stereotactic body radiation therapy, uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving atezolizumab and radiation therapy may work better than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with early non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 155 locations

  • Testing the Addition of Radiation Therapy to the Usual Immune Therapy Treatment (Atezolizumab) for Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer, The RAPTOR Trial

    This phase II / III trial compares the effect of adding radiation therapy to the usual maintenance therapy with atezolizumab versus atezolizumab alone in patients who have already received atezolizumab plus chemotherapy for the treatment of small cell lung cancer that has spread outside of the lung or to other parts of the body (extensive stage). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving radiation therapy in addition to atezolizumab may extend the time without extensive small cell lung cancer growing or spreading compared to atezolizumab alone.
    Location: 152 locations

  • Study of Radiation Therapy Followed by Atezolizumab in Stage II or III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    This trial studies the side effects of radiation therapy followed by atezolizumab in treating patients with stage II or III non-small cell lung cancer. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy delivers smaller doses of radiation therapy over time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to test the safety and effectiveness of radiation therapy followed by atezolizumab and find out what side effects, if any, it has on patient's non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 86 locations

  • Olaparib with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Non-HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well olaparib with or without atezolizumab work in treating patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and is not amenable to surgical resection (locally advanced unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known whether giving olaparib with or without atezolizumab will work better in patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer.
    Location: 48 locations

  • Testing Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in People with Advanced Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works in treating patients with alveolar soft part sarcoma that has not been treated, has spread from where it started to other places in the body (advanced) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Atezolizumab works by unblocking your immune system, allowing your immune system cells to recognize and then attack your tumor cells. Bevacizumab works by controlling the growth of new blood vessels. Giving atezolizumab and bevacizumab may shrink the cancer.
    Location: 39 locations

  • Study of Cabozantinib in Combination With Atezolizumab to Subjects With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is a multicenter Phase 1b, open-label study to assess safety, tolerability, preliminary efficacy, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of cabozantinib taken in combination with atezolizumab in subjects with multiple tumor types, including advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) (including bladder, renal pelvis, ureter, urethra), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), ovarian cancer (OC), endometrial cancer (EC), hepatocellular cancer (HCC), gastric cancer / gastroesophageal junction cancer / lower esophageal cancer (GC / GEJC / LEC), colorectal cancer (CRC), head and neck (H&N) cancer, and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The study consists of two stages: in the Dose Escalation Stage, an appropriate recommended cabozantinib dose for the combination with standard dosing regimen of atezolizumab will be established; in the Expansion Stage, tumor-specific cohorts will be enrolled in order to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination treatment in these tumor indications. Three exploratory single-agent cabozantinib (SAC) cohorts may also be enrolled with UC, NSCLC, or CRPC subjects. One exploratory single-agent atezolizumab (SAA) cohort may also be enrolled with CRPC subjects. Subjects enrolled in the SAC cohorts and SAA cohort may receive combination treatment with both cabozantinib and atezolizumab after they experience radiographic progressive disease per the Investigator per RECIST 1.1. Due to the nature of this study design, some tumor cohorts may complete enrollment earlier than others.
    Location: 28 locations

  • Carboplatin, Pemetrexed, and Bevacizumab with or without Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Stage IV Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies if the combination therapy of carboplatin, pemetrexed, bevacizumab (Avastin) and atezolizumab (Tecentriq) is better at controlling disease progression in non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who have never smoked or have a sensitizing EGFR mutation as compared to patients treated with the combination therapy without Tecentriq. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and pemetrexed, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This may prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin, pemetrexed, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer that have EGFR mutation or do not have EGFR mutation but have never smoked, compared to carboplatin, pemetrexed, and bevacizumab without atezolizumab.
    Location: 18 locations

  • Atezolizumab with or without Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab with or without eribulin mesylate and how well they work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has come back (recurrent), spread to nearby tissues and lymph nodes (locally advanced), or other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as eribulin mesylate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab and eribulin mesylate may work better at treating urothelial cancer compared to atezolizumab alone.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Testing Atezolizumab in Patients >= 2 Years Old with Newly Diagnosed, Unresectable, or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma or Chondrosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works in treating patients with chondrosarcoma or clear cell sarcoma that is newly diagnosed, cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 13 locations

  • A Study of Neoadjuvant Atezolizumab Plus Chemotherapy Versus Placebo Plus Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Stage II, IIIA, or Select IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (IMpower030)

    This is a randomized, double-blinded study designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of neoadjuvant treatment with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A) or placebo in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy in participants with resectable Stage II, IIIA, or select IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) followed by open-label adjuvant / postoperative atezolizumab or best supportive care and monitoring.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Study of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Participants With Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (Morpheus-Pancreatic Cancer)

    A Phase Ib / II, open-label, multicenter, randomized study designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary anti-tumor activity of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in participants with metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: Cohort 1 will consist of patients who have received no prior systemic therapy for metastatic PDAC, and Cohort 2 will consist of patients who have received one line of prior systemic therapy for PDAC. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms.
    Location: 12 locations

  • A Study of Atezolizumab in Combination With Cabozantinib Compared to Cabozantinib Alone in Participants With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma After Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Treatment

    This is a Phase III, multicenter, randomized, open-label study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab given in combination with cabozantinib versus cabozantinib alone in participants with inoperable, locally advanced, or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who experienced radiographic tumor progression during or after Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor (ICI) treatment in the metastatic setting.
    Location: 13 locations

  • A Study of Atezolizumab Plus Carboplatin and Etoposide With or Without Tiragolumab in Patients With Untreated Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This study will evaluate the efficacy of tiragolumab plus atezolizumab and carboplatin and etoposide (CE) compared with placebo plus atezolizumab and CE in participants with chemotherapy-naive extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Eligible participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive one of the following treatment regimens during induction phase:- - Arm A: Tiragolumab plus atezolizumab and CE - Arm B: Placebo plus atezolizumab and CE Following the induction phase, participants will continue maintenance therapy with either atezolizumab plus tiragolumab (Arm A) or atezolizumab plus placebo (Arm B).
    Location: 10 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Cobimetinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Recurrent, or Refractory Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and cobimetinib work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), has come back (recurrent), or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cobimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving atezolizumab and cobimetinib may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 10 locations

  • QUILT-3.055: A Study of Combination Immunotherapies in Patients Who Have Previously Received Treatment With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

    This is a Phase IIb, multicohort, open-label multicenter study of combination immunotherapies in patients who have previously received treatment with PD-1 / PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitors. All patients in Cohorts 1-4 will receive the combination treatment of PD-1 / PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor plus N-803 for up to 17 cycles. Each cycle is six weeks in duration. Some patients who experience disease progression while on study in Cohorts 1-4 may roll over into Cohort 5 and receive combination therapy with a PD-1 / PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor, N-803, and PD-L1 t-haNK cellular therapy for up to an additional 17 cycles. Each cycle is six weeks in duration. All patients will receive N-803 once every 3 weeks. Patients will also receive the same checkpoint inhibitor that they received during their previous therapy. Radiologic evaluation will occur at the end of each treatment cycle. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years, or until the patient experiences confirmed progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity, withdraws consent, or if the Investigator feels it is no longer in the patient's best interest to continue treatment. Patients will be followed for disease progression, post-therapies, and survival through 24 months past administration of the first dose of study drug.
    Location: 10 locations

  • A Safety and Pharmacokinetic Study of BTCT4465A (Mosunetuzumab) as a Single Agent and Combined With Atezolizumab in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    This is a Phase 1 / 1b dose-escalation study of BTCT4465A (Mosunetuzumab) administered as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab in participants with relapsed or refractory B-cell NHL and CLL. The study will consist of a dose-escalation stage and an expansion stage where participants will be enrolled into indication-specific cohorts.
    Location: 10 locations


1 2 3 ... 6 Next >