Clinical Trials Using Avelumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Avelumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 52

  • DCC-3014 and Avelumab for the Treatment of Locally Advanced or Metastatic High-Grade Sarcoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of DCC-3014 and how well it works when given together with avelumab for the treatment of high-grade sarcoma that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or to other places in the body (metastatic). DCC-3014 may help fight cancer by targeting a type of white blood cell called a macrophage. Macrophages are immune cells that are present in or around tumors. Certain macrophages can block the body’s immune system from fighting cancer. Some tumors do not respond to immunotherapy drugs alone because of these macrophages. DCC-3014 may stop macrophages from blocking the immune system and may allow immunotherapy to stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DCC-3014 and avelumab may help improve symptoms and shrink or stabilize cancer.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Comparing Length of Treatment with Immunotherapy in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase III trial compares 1 year immunotherapy treatment versus continuous immunotherapy treatment beyond 1 year in patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy such as pembrolizumab, nivolumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab are drugs given through a vein to the entire body to activate the immune system. Comparing the treatment lengths may help doctors determine the ideal length of time for treatment with immunotherapy in patients with solid tumors.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Avelumab and IL-15 for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Metastatic Clear Cell Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well avelumab and IL-15 work in treating patients with clear cell kidney cancer that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory), and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Avelumab is a monoclonal antibody which belongs to a family of molecules called anti-PD-L1 antibodies. PD-L1 is a cell surface protein, found in different human tumor types. It is believed to interrupt the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. Avelumab interferes with the activity of PD-L1 and is thought to potentially have an effect on the immune system (in particular white blood cells) in order to induce an anti-tumor attack. IL-15 is a man-made version of a small protein (cytokine) that is naturally produced in the body by certain white blood cells and increases the activity and strength of the immune system. Giving avelumab in combination with IL-15 may improve the outcome of therapy in patients with clear cell kidney cancer.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Avelumab in Combination with AXL Inhibitor AVB-S6-500 for the Treatment of Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of AVB-S6-500 when given together with avelumab in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. AVB-S6-500 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Given AVB-S6-500 and avelumab together may work better than giving either one alone in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Axitinib and Avelumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib and avelumab work in treating patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving axitinib and avelumab together may help to control adenoid cystic carcinoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • KHK2455 (IDO Inhibitor) Plus Avelumab in Adult Subjects With Advanced Bladder Cancer

    This is a two-part (dose-escalation, dose-expansion), multicenter, open-label Phase 1 study of KHK2455 in combination with avelumab in adult subjects with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma (including bladder, urethra, ureters, and renal pelvis).
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Avelumab in Combination With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Relapsed Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Background: Multiple myeloma is a cancer that forms from plasma cells which normally produce important immune response antibodies. It cannot be cured. Researchers hope the combination of radiation combined with the drug avelumab causes the immune system to kill myeloma cells more effectively. Objective: To see if avelumab given with radiation treatment helps treat multiple myeloma. Also to see if giving the treatments together is safe. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with multiple myeloma that has come back after treatment and has spread to other parts of the body Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Possible tumor biopsy Bone marrow testing: A needle will be stuck into the participant s hipbone to take out a small amount of marrow. PET / CT scan and MRI: Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. Participants will get avelumab through an IV. An IV is a small plastic tube put into an arm vein. They will get avelumab every 2 weeks for 2 doses. Then they will get radiation each day for 5 days. They will continue to get avelumab every 2 weeks as long as they do not have bad side effects and the treatment is helping their disease. Participants will have blood and urine tests, bone marrow biopsies, scans, and X-rays repeated during the study. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment dose. Then they will have visits every 3 6 months for up to 5 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Avelumab and Bacille Calmette-Guerin for the Treatment of Recurrent Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer, ABC Study

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab and Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and how well they work for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer that has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. BCG is a weakened form of the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis that does not cause disease. BCG is used in a solution to stimulate the immune system in the treatment of bladder cancer. It is unclear whether the addition of avelumab may or may not potentially negate, rather than add to, the treatment effect of BCG alone in recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Gene-Modified Immune Cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Merkel Cell Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of gene-modified immune cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) and to see how well they work in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into immune cells may improve the body's ability to fight Merkel cell cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Pemetrexed and Avelumab in Treating Patients with MTAP-Deficient Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pemetrexed and avelumab work in treating patients with MTAP-deficient urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Pemetrexed may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving pemetrexed and avelumab may work better in treating patients with MTAP-deficient urothelial cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Avelumab and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Leptomeningeal Disease

    This phase Ib trial studies side effects of avelumab when given together with whole-brain radiation therapy in treating patients with leptomeningeal disease. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Whole-brain radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving avelumab and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with leptomeningeal disease.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Avelumab and Endocrine Therapy with or without Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well avelumab and endocrine therapy given with or without palbociclib work in treating patients with stage I-III estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Endocrine therapy may lower the amount of estrogen made by the body or may block the use of estrogen by tumor cells. This may help stop the growth of tumor cells that need estrogen to grow. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not known whether giving avelumab and endocrine therapy with or without palbociclib will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Avelumab, Palbociclib, and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib, when given together with avelumab and cetuximab, in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back or spread to other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving avelumab, palbociclib, and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Avelumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab when given together with chemoradiation in treating patients with stage II-III esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Giving avelumab and chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Gemcitabine and Avelumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Kidney Cancer

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine when given together with avelumab in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine and avelumab may work better in treating patients with kidney cancer.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Avelumab, Utomilumab, Rituximab, Ibrutinib, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of avelumab, utomilumab, rituximab, ibrutinib, and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, utomilumab, and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide phosphate, carboplatin, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving avelumab, utomilumab, rituximab, ibrutinib, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • OX40, Venetoclax, Avelumab, Glasdegib, Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600 (OX40) and how well it works alone or in combination with venetoclax, avelumab, glasdegib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and azacitidine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as OX40 and avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Glasdegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax and azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving OX40, venetoclax, avelumab, glasdegib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and azacitidine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Hydroxychloroquine Sulfate with or without Avelumab in Treating Participants with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hydroxychloroquine sulfate with or without avelumab work before surgery in treating participants with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hydroxychloroquine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, hydroxychloroquine sulfate and avelumab before surgery may work better in treating participants with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Avelumab with or without Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of avelumab with or without laser interstitial thermal therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with glioblastoma that has come back after previous treatment (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Laser interstitial thermal therapy is a procedure where doctors insert a thin laser probe guided by magnetic resonance imaging into the skull to help breakdown the blood-brain barrier and allow proteins in that may help T cells fight cancer. Giving avelumab with laser interstitial thermal therapy may work better in treating patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Avelumab and Hypofractionated Proton Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Recurrent Radiation-Refractory Meningioma

    This phase Ib trial studies how well avelumab and hypofractionated proton radiation therapy before surgery work in treating patients with meningioma that has come back (recurrent) and has not responded to radiation therapy (radiation-refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Proton radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving avelumab and hypofractionated proton radiation therapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with meningioma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Avelumab, Utomilumab, Anti-OX40 Antibody PF-04518600, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab when given in different combinations with utomilumab, anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600, and radiation therapy in treating patients with malignancies that have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, utomilumab, and anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known how well avelumab works in combination with these other anti-cancer therapies in patients with advanced malignancies.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cabozantinib S-malate and Avelumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib s-malate and avelumab in treating participants with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib s-malate and avelumab may work better in treating participants with metastatic kidney cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • A Pilot Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of Avelumab (MSB0010718C) in Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma After Progression on Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    Background: Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are cancers originating in the thymus gland. Platinum-based chemotherapy is standard treatment for them. But not uncommonly, the disease returns and people need more treatment to keep the cancer from growing. The drug Avelumab could help the immune system fight cancer. Objective: To test if avelumab is safe and well-tolerated, and is effective in treating relapsed or refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with thymoma or thymic carcinoma that has returned or progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with: - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scan: They lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Physical exam - Medical history - Biopsy: a needle removes a piece of tumor. Samples can be from a previous procedure, although it is desirable to undergo a new biopsy. Participants will have treatment in 2-week cycles. They will continue until the side effects are not tolerable or their disease gets worse. Visits at the following time points are required per protocol. Patients who respond to treatment or have durable stability after at least 12 months of therapy may undergo a dose de-escalation regimen to continue on therapy. - Every 2 weeks: Participants will get avelumab by infusion in a vein (IV). They will get diphenhydramine (benadryl) and acetaminophen (tylenol) by mouth or IV before receiving avelumab to decrease the chances of developing a reaction to avelumab. They will have blood, urine, and heart tests periodically. - Cycles 4 and 7, then every 6 weeks: Scans will be performed to look for shrinkage or growth of tumor. - Cycle 4: Participants will be offered a chance to undergo a biopsy. - 2-4 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests will be performed. Participants might undergo a scan. - 10 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests. - About 6 months after stopping treatment, then every 3 months: Participants will have scans andcan allow genetic testing on their blood and tissue samples.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Avelumab and Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Platinum Refractory or Ineligible Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of avelumab and how well it works when given together with docetaxel in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to platinum chemotherapy or cannot receive platinum chemotherapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving avelumab and docetaxel may work better in treating patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Short-term Fasting prior to Standard of Care PD-1 / PD-L1 Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Skin Malignancy

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of short-term fasting in patients with skin malignancy that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic) treated with a PD-L1 or PD-1 inhibitor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, nivolumab, cemiplimab, avelumab, atezolizumab, or durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Undergoing short-term fasting prior to treatment with one of these PD-L1 or PD-1 inhibitors may potentially reduce the side effects of immunotherapy or even improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in patients with skin malignancy.
    Location: 2 locations