Clinical Trials Using Avelumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Avelumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-57 of 57

  • Avelumab With Bempegaldesleukin With or Without Talazoparib or Enzalutamide in Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    Evaluation of the combination of avelumab + bempegaldesleukin (NKTR-214 ) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck ( metastatic SCCHN) and avelumab + bempegaldesleukin (NKTR-214) + talazoparib or enzalutamide in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, M6620, to the Usual Treatments (Carboplatin and Gemcitabine) and to Avelumab for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose of carboplatin when given together with M6620, gemcitabine and avelumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage IV squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer. M6620 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving M6620 together with carboplatin, gemcitabine, and avelumab may work better in treating patients with squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer compared to carboplatin, gemcitabine, and avelumab alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Radiation Medication (Radium-223 dichloride) versus Radium-223 dichloride plus Radiation Enhancing Medication (M3814) versus Radium-223 dichloride plus M3814 plus Avelumab (a type of immunotherapy) for Advanced Prostate Cancer Not Responsive to Hormonal Therapy

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of M3814 when given together with radium-223 dichloride or with radium-223 dichloride and avelumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer that had spread to other places in the body (metastatic). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to find out the better treatment between radium-223 dichloride alone, radium-223 dichloride in combination with M3814, or radium-223 dichloride in combination with both M3814 and avelumab, to lower the chance of prostate cancer growing or spreading in the bone, and if this approach is better or worse than the usual approach for advanced prostate cancer not responsive to hormonal therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Short-term Fasting prior to Standard of Care PD-1 / PD-L1 Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Skin Malignancy

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of short-term fasting in patients with skin malignancy that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic) treated with a PD-L1 or PD-1 inhibitor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, nivolumab, cemiplimab, avelumab, atezolizumab, or durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Undergoing short-term fasting prior to treatment with one of these PD-L1 or PD-1 inhibitors may potentially reduce the side effects of immunotherapy or even improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in patients with skin malignancy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Avelumab and Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Platinum Refractory or Ineligible Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of avelumab and how well it works when given together with docetaxel in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to platinum chemotherapy or cannot receive platinum chemotherapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving avelumab and docetaxel may work better in treating patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Biomarker-Driven Therapy and Immunotherapy in Screening Participants with Recurrent or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (The Expanded Lung-MAP Screening Trial)

    This expansion of the screening and multi-sub-study Lung-MAP trial is motivated by the changing landscape due to progress in the development of immunotherapies. The Lung-MAP trial was originally opened in June of 2014 for second-line treatment of participants with stage IV squamous lung cancer or squamous lung cancer that has come back (recurrent). The trial was amended to allow all participants with previously-treated stage IV or recurrent squamous lung cancer in 2015. The study is now expanding to allow participants with all types of previously-treated stage IV or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. The type of cancer trait (biomarker) will determine to which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned in order to compare new targeted cancer therapy designed to block the growth and spread of cancer, with the ultimate goal of being able to approve new targeted therapies in this setting. In addition, the protocol includes “non-match” sub-studies which will include all screened participants not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.
    Location: 763 locations

  • Intratumoral Microdosing of TAK-981 in Head and Neck Cancer

    This is a multi-center, single arm, open-label, multi-agent, localized pharmacodynamic biomarker Phase 0 trial designed to study the biological effects within the tumor microenvironment of TAK-981 and TAK-981 combined with cetuximab or avelumab when administered intratumorally in microdose quantities via the CIVO device. CIVO stands for comparative in vivo oncology.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington