Clinical Trials Using Axitinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Axitinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • A Study to Compare Treatments for a Type of Kidney Cancer called TFE / Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma (tRCC)

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib and nivolumab work in treating patients with TFE / translocation renal cell carcinoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving axitinib and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with TFE / translocation renal cell carcinoma compared to standard treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, or immunotherapy.
    Location: 233 locations

  • Axitinib with or without Anti-OX40 Antibody PF-04518600 in Treating Patients with Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well axitinib with or without anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600 work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving axitinib with or without anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600 may work better in treating patients with kidney cancer.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Talazoparib and Axitinib for the Treatment of Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of talazoparib and how well it works when given together with axitinib for the treatment of kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Talazoparib prevents cancer cells from repairing their DNA, which is the body's genetic instruction book. Without repair, cancer cells collect errors in their DNA and eventually die. Axitinib works by blocking the blood flow to cancer cells, and this blocking action stops the cancer cells from growing and spreading. Giving talazoparib and axitinib may be more effective in shrinking or stabilizing kidney cancer compared to giving either drug on its own.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Axitinib and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Kidney Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of axitinib when given together with nivolumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving axitinib together with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with advanced kidney cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Axitinib and Avelumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib and avelumab work in treating patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving axitinib and avelumab together may help to control adenoid cystic carcinoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Axitinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Recurrent, or Primary Unresectable Pheochromocytoma or Paraganglioma

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib works in treating patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), has come back (recurrent), or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Axitinib may stop the growth or shrink tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Axitinib before Surgery in Treating Participants with Localized Clear Cell Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib works before surgery in treating participants with clear cell kidney cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving axitinib before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Axitinib and L-Selenomethionine in Treating Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of L-selenomethionine when given together with axitinib in treating patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced metastatic). L-selenomethionine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving L-selenomethionine together with axitinib may be a better treatment for advanced metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Pembrolizumab with or without Axitinib for the Treatment of Locally Advanced or Metastatic Clear Cell Kidney Cancer in Patients Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab with or without standard of care axitinib works in treating patients with clear cell kidney cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic) who are undergoing surgery. Pembrolizumab is an antibody that is designed to bind to and block the activity of PD-1, a molecule in the body that may be responsible for inhibiting the body’s immune response against cancer cells. Axitinib is a type of drug known as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors work by blocking enzymes called tyrosine kinases. These enzymes may be too active or found at high levels in some types of cancer cells and blocking them may help keep cancer cells from growing. Giving pembrolizumab with or without axitinib may work better in controlling the cancer and decrease the likelihood of it coming back following surgery in patients with kidney cancer compared to usual treatment (surgery followed by chemotherapy and / or radiation therapy).
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California