Clinical Trials Using Azacitidine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Azacitidine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 84
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  • Pevonedistat, Azacitidine, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well pevonedistat, azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Magrolimab Monotherapy or Magrolimab in Combination With Azacitidine in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    This trial will evaluate magrolimab, a monoclonal antibody which is designed to block a protein called CD47, which is widely expressed on human cancer cells. Blocking CD47 with magrolimab may enable the body's immune system to find and destroy the cancer cells. In this study, magrolimab may be given alone or in combination with azacitidine to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Azacitidine is a drug used for treatment of AML or MDS in patients who are not eligible for typical chemotherapy. The major aims of the study are: to confirm the safety and tolerability of magrolimab monotherapy in a relapsed / refractory AML and MDS population, and of magrolimab in combination with azacitidine in previously untreated AML and MDS; to evaluate the efficacy of magrolimab monotherapy in relapsed / refractory AML / MDS, and of magrolimab in combination with azacitidine in previously untreated AML / MDS, as measured by the objective response rate; and to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of magrolimab monotherapy or combination with azacitidine in low-risk MDS patients as measured by RBC transfusion independence rate.
    Location: 18 locations

  • Study of Biomarker-Based Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This screening and multi-sub-study Phase 1b / 2 trial will establish a method for genomic screening followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-study "Master Protocol (BAML-16-001-M1)." The specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia will determine which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to evaluate investigational therapies or combinations with the ultimate goal of advancing new targeted therapies for approval. The study also includes a marker negative sub-study which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.
    Location: 17 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine or decitabine before usual chemotherapy may change the genetics of the leukemia cell by priming it to be more sensitive to the chemotherapy that will follow in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Open-label Study of FT-2102 With or Without Azacitidine or Cytarabine in Patients With AML or MDS With an IDH1 Mutation

    This Phase 1 / 2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 (olutasidenib) activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 8 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (as a single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination) on various AML / MDS disease states.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Malignancies

    An open-label, global, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax monotherapy, to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in pediatric and young adult participants with relapsed or refractory malignancies.
    Location: 9 locations

  • IMGN632 as Monotherapy or With Venetoclax and / or Azacitidine for Patients With CD123-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1b / 2 study to determine the safety and tolerability of IMGN632 and assess the antileukemia activity of IMGN632 when administered in combination with azacitidine and / or venetoclax in patients with relapsed and frontline CD123-positive AML, and antileukemia activity of IMGN632 when administered as monotherapy in patients with MRD+ AML after frontline treatment.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Nivolumab in Combination With 5-azacytidine in Childhood Relapsed / Refractory AML

    This is a phase I / II Study of Nivolumab in Combination with 5-azacytidine in pediatric patients with relapsed / refractory acute myeloid leukemia
    Location: 13 locations

  • Azacitidine, Entinostat, and Nivolumab or Nivolumab Alone in Treating Patients with Recurrent Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well azacitidine, entinostat, and nivolumab or nivolumab alone work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has come back (recurrent) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Entinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.. It is not yet known if azacitidine and entinostat followed by nivolumab or nivolumab alone is more effective in treating non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Venetoclax in Combination With Azacitidine in Participants With Treatment-Naïve Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    This is a Phase 1b, open-label, non-randomized, multicenter, dose-finding study evaluating venetoclax in combination with azacitidine in participants with treatment-naïve higher-risk MDS comprising a dose-escalation portion and a safety expansion portion.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 (Gilteritinib) by Itself, ASP2215 Combined With Azacitidine or Azacitidine by Itself to Treat Adult Patients Who Have Recently Been Diagnosed With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a FLT3 Gene Mutation and Who Cannot Receive Standard Chemotherapy

    This is a clinical study for adult patients who have recently been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia or AML. AML is a type of cancer. It is when bone marrow makes white blood cells that are not normal. These are called leukemia cells. Some patients with AML have a mutation, or change, in the FLT3 gene. This gene helps leukemia cells make a protein called FLT3. This protein causes the leukemia cells to grow faster. For patients with AML who cannot receive standard chemotherapy, azacitidine (also known as Vidaza®) is a current standard of care treatment option in the United States. This clinical study is testing an experimental medicine called ASP2215, also known as gilteritinib. Gilteritinib works by stopping the leukemia cells from making the FLT3 protein. This can help stop the leukemia cells from growing faster. This study will compare two different treatments. Patients are assigned to one of these two groups by chance: a medicine called azacitidine, also known as Vidaza®, or an experimental medicine gilteritinib in combination with azacitidine. There is a twice as much chance to receive both medicines combined than azacitidine alone. The clinical study may help show which treatment helps patients live longer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • AMG 176 First in Human Trial in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma and Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    At least one dose level of AMG 176 will achieve acceptable safety and tolerability in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and subjects with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia
    Location: 7 locations

  • APR-246 in Combination With Venetoclax and Azacitidine in TP53-Mutant Myeloid Malignancies

    This clinical trial is a Phase I, open-label, dose-finding and cohort expansion study to determine the safety and preliminary efficacy of APR-246 in combination with venetoclax and azacitidine in patients with myeloid malignancies.
    Location: 6 locations

  • APR-246 in Combination With Azacitidine for TP53 Mutated AML (Acute Myeloid Leukemia) or MDS (Myelodysplastic Syndromes) Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    A multi-center, open label, Phase II clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of APR-246 in combination with azacitidine as maintenance therapy after allogeneic HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplant) for patients with TP53 mutant AML or MDS.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Recurrent Resectable Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of azacitidine and how well it works with or without nivolumab in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) and can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and azacitidine together may work better compared to nivolumab alone in treating patients with osteosarcoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of GSK3326595 and Other Agents to Treat Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    GSK3326595 is a potent, selective, reversible inhibitor of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) / Methylosome protein 50 (MEP50) complex that is being tested as an oral treatment for human participants with cancer. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia are bone marrow neoplasms for which novel, effective therapies are desperately needed. This is an open-label, multicenter, multi-part study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and clinical activity of GSK3326595 in participants with relapsed and refractory MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and hypoproliferative AML that has evolved from an antecedent MDS. The study will be conducted in two parts and at the end of Part 1, if pre-specified criteria are met, then the study will be expanded with three additional parts that will be opened in parallel (Part 2A, 2B and 2C). Part 1 is composed of a single-arm dose expansion cohort to determine the clinical benefit rate of GSK3326595. Part 2A is a randomized head-to-head Phase II evaluation of GSK3326595 compared to investigator's choice of best available care (BAC). Part 2B is composed of an abbreviated series of dose escalation cohorts followed by a single-arm dose expansion cohort to determine the overall response rate of the combination of GSK3326595 plus 5-azaciditine in newly-diagnosed MDS. Part 2C is a single-arm dose expansion study to evaluate the clinical activity of single-agent GSK3326595 in participants with AML whose disease contains mutations in spliceosome proteins.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Low Dose Azacitidine after Transplant in Preventing Recurrence in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well low dose azacitidine after transplant works in preventing cancer from coming back in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia in remission. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work to stop the growth of cancer cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pevonedistat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Myelodysplastic Syndrome / Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Who Fail Primary Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well pevonedistat and azacitidine work in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or myelodysplastic syndrome / myeloproliferative neoplasm that has failed primary therapy, that does not respond to treatment (refractory), or has come back (recurrent). Pevonedistat and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study of ASTX030 (Cedazuridine in Combination With Azacitidine) in MDS, CMML, or AML

    Study ASTX030-01 is designed to move efficiently from Phase 1 to Phase 3. Phase 1 consists of an open-label Dose Escalation Stage (Stage A) using multiple cohorts at escalating dose levels of oral cedazuridine and azacitidine (only one study drug will be escalated at a time) followed by a Dose Expansion Stage (Stage B) of ASTX030. Phase 2 is a randomized open-label crossover study to compare oral ASTX030 to subcutaneous (SC) azacitidine. Phase 3 is a randomized open-label crossover study comparing the final oral ASTX030 tablet to SC azacitidine. The duration of the study is expected to be approximately 36 months.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Trial of DFP-10917 vs Non-Intensive or Intensive Reinduction for AML Patients in 2nd / 3rd Salvage

    Phase III, multicenter, randomized study with two arms (1:1 ratio) enrolling patients with AML relapsed / refractory after 2 or 3 prior induction regimens: Experimental arm: DFP-10917 14-day continuous intravenous (IV) infusion at a dose of 6 mg / m² / day followed by a 14-day resting period per 28-day cycles. Control arm: Non-Intensive Reinduction (LoDAC, Azacitidine, Decitabine) or Intensive Reinduction (High and Intermediate Dose Cytarabine Regimens), depending on the patient's prior induction treatment.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pevonedistat with Azacitidine versus Azacitidine Alone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well pevonedistat works with azacitidine compared to azacitidine alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known if pevonedistat with azacitidine or azacitidine alone may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Phase 1b / 2 Study of Alvocidib Plus Decitabine or Azacitidine in Patients With MDS

    Alvocidib, a cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK 9) inhibitor, in time-sequential therapy demonstrated significant clinical activity in secondary AML patients with prior MDS. Patients with IPSS-R intermediate and above MDS have an increased risk of developing AML and may be treated with the same chemotherapy regimens used in patients with AML. Eight Phase I or II clinical trials have been completed in patients with AML, totaling more than 400 patients with both relapsed / refractory or newly diagnosed AML. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that decitabine exposure increased the expression of NOXA, which is a specific antagonist of the survival factor MCL 1. Pharmacologic downregulation of MCL-1 via CDK 9 inhibition, as well as upregulation of the MCL-1 antagonist, NOXA, following decitabine exposure may result in enhanced antileukemic activity in MCL-1-dependent malignancies.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Azacitidine and Enasidenib in Treating Patients with IDH2-Mutant Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well azacitidine and enasidenib work in treating patients with IDH2-mutant myelodysplastic syndrome. Azacitidine and enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Tagraxofusp-erzs, Azacitidine and Venetoclax for the Treatment of Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of tagraxofusp-erzs (SL-401) when given together with azacitidine, or azacitidine and venetoclax, in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that is untreated, has come back (relapsed), or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or myelodysplastic syndrome. Combinations of biological substances in tagraxofusp-erzs may be able to carry cancer-killing substances directly to cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called Bcl-2 needed for cell growth. Giving tagraxofusp-erzs with azacitidine and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome compared to standard therapy.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of AZD2811 Nanoparticles as Monotherapy or in Combination in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    This is a Phase I / II clinical study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of AZD2811 monotherapy or with combination agent(s) in relapsed / refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients or treatment-naïve AML patients not eligible for intensive induction therapy. The study will also explore the potential clinical activity by assessing anti-tumour activity in patients. The study will be conducted in two parts, designated Part A, dose escalation, and Part B, dose expansion
    Location: 4 locations


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