Clinical Trials Using Bendamustine Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Bendamustine Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-17 of 17
  • A Comparison of Three Chemotherapy Regimens for the Treatment of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial compares three chemotherapy regimens consisting of bendamustine, rituximab, high dose cytarabine, and acalabrutinib and studies how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study is being done to find out if one the drug combinations of bendamustine, rituximab, high dose cytarabine, and acalabrutinib is better or worse than the usual approach for mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: 389 locations

  • Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Rituximab, Ibrutinib, and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when giving together with bendamustine hydrochloride, rituximab, and ibrutinib in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving bendamustine hydrochloride, rituximab, ibrutinib, and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Phase II Venetoclax, Obinutuzumab and Bendamustine in High Tumor Burden Follicular Lymphoma as Front Line Therapy

    Patients with high tumor burden, low grade follicular lymphoma that has never been treated, will receive venetoclax in combination with obinutuzumab and bendamustine. Venetoclax is an oral Bcl-2 family protein inhibitor. It targets the B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) protein, which supports cancer cell growth and is overexpressed in many patients with follicular lymphoma. Venetoclax may help to slow down the growth of cancer or may cause cancer cells to die. The purpose of this study is to see whether adding venetoclax to obinutuzumab and bendamustine improves the response (the tumor shrinks or disappears) in patients with follicular lymphoma. As of 9 / 5 / 2018, a higher than expected incidence of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) was experienced among patients receiving venetoclax, obinutuzumab and bendamustine on Cycle 1, Day 1 of treatment. TLS is caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. These patients developed an increase in some of their blood tests (uric acid, phosphorus, potassium and / or creatinine). They received a medication called rasburicase and continued with treatment. It is unclear if the TLS was due to the venetoclax or the standard treatment of obinutuzumab and bendamustine. For the remaining patients, venetoclax will start on Cycle 2, Day 1 (previously Cycle 1, Day 1).
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Study of Brentuximab Vedotin With Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and CD30-expressing Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (PTCL)

    This trial will study brentuximab vedotin to find out whether it is an effective treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Participants in this study will be older or will have other conditions that make them unable to have standard chemotherapy treatment. The study will look at brentuximab vedotin alone and combined with other drugs.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Phase II Study of Bendamustine and Rituximab Plus Venetoclax in Untreated Mantle Cell Lymphoma Over 60 Years of Age

    Eligible untreated patients will receive single arm venetoclax, bendamustine and rituximab as induction therapy. After 6 cycles, maintenance rituximab may be administered per physician discretion. Venetoclax is an oral Bcl-2 family protein inhibitor. It targets the B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) protein, which supports cancer cell growth and is overexpressed in many patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Venetoclax may make the cancer cells sensitive to chemotherapy. This may help to slow down the growth of cancer or may cause cancer cells to die. The purpose of this study is to see if venetoclax in combination with bendamustine and rituximab chemotherapy is effective in treating people who have mantle cell lymphoma and to examine the side effects, good and bad, associated with this combination.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Gemcitabine, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine, bendamustine hydrochloride, and nivolumab when given together and to see how well they work in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine, bendamustine hydrochloride, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Bendamustine, Rituximab, Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well bendamustine, rituximab, and venetoclax in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine, rituximab, and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax may also block proteins present on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Giving bendamustine and rituximab followed by venetoclax may increase response to therapy and reduce the risk of complications.
    Location: 2 locations

  • INCB050465 in Combination With Rituximab, Bendamustine and Rituximab, or Ibrutinib in Participants With Previously Treated B-Cell Lymphoma (CITADEL-112)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of parsaclisib when combined with rituximab, bendamustine and rituximab, or ibrutinib in participants with relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Tafasitamab With Bendamustine (BEN) Versus Rituximab (RTX) With BEN in Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    The purpose of the study is to compare the safety and efficacy of Tafasitamab with BEN versus RTX with BEN in adult patients with relapsed of refractory DLBCL.
    Location: 3 locations

  • T Lymphocytes Expressing the Kappa Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) and CD28 Endodomain for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Kappa-Positive Mantle Cell or Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of T lymphocytes expressing the kappa CAR and CD28 endodomain (CAR.kappa.28) in treating patients with kappa-positive mantle cell or indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). The treatment tested in this study uses modified T-cells called autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor (ATLCAR) cells targeted against the kappa light chain antibody on cancer cells. The anti-kappa light chain antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood, a part of it is now joined to the T cells. Only the part of the antibody that sticks to the lymphoma cells is attached to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way, it is called a chimeric receptor. These kappa light chain chimeric (combination) receptor-activated T cells, which are called ATLCAR.kappa.28, can kill some of the tumor. They do not, however, last very long in the body and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Bendamustine and Rituximab in Combination with Copanlisib for the Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This trial studies how well bendamustine and rituximab in combination with copanlisib work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine and rituximab, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Copanlisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving bendamustine and rituximab with copanlisib may work better than bendamustine and rituximab alone in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Rituximab, Brentuximab Vedotin, and Bendamustine for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Post Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well rituximab, brentuximab vedotin, and bendamustine work in treating patients with newly diagnosed post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called vedotin. Brentuximab attached to CD30 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as bendamustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adding brentuximab vedotin to rituximab or to rituximab and bendamustine may kill more cancer cells in patients with post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Genetically Engineered Cells (ATLCAR.CD30 T Cells) for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory CD30 Positive Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well genetically engineered cells (ATLCAR.CD30 T cells) work in treating patients with CD30 positive peripheral T cell lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). T cells are special types of blood cells. They can find and destroy other cells that may cause disease or cancer. However, sometimes cancer cells can hide from T cells and grow into tumors. Genes make up the chemical structure carrying information that may determine human characteristics (i.e., eye color, height and sex). In this study, a gene that makes an antibody called anti-CD30 is put inside T cells, which may make T cells better at recognizing and destroying CD30 positive peripheral T cell lymphoma cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4 with or without ATLCAR.CD30 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma or Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies best dose and how well autologous CCR4-CD30CAR-CD28-CD3zeta-expressing T-Lymphocytes (ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4) with or without autologous CD30CAR-CD28-CD3zeta-expressing T-Lymphocytes (ATLCAR.CD30) works in treating patients with CD30+ Hodgkin lymphoma or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that has come back or that does not respond to treatment. T cells or T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with bacteria or viruses. Modified T-cells called autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor cells targeted against the CD30 antigen (ATLCAR.CD30) and autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor cells targeted against the CD30 antigen with CCR4 (ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4) may help the cells move to regions in the body where the cancer is present and may improve the body's ability to fight Hodgkin lymphoma or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Bendamustine Hydrochloride and Melphalan, with or without Rituximab, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Elderly Patients with Multiple Myeloma or Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of rituximab, bendamustine hydrochloride and melphalan and how well they work in treating elderly patients with multiple myeloma or B-cell Lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) before undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Cellular Immunotherapy following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cellular immunotherapy following chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia that has come back. Placing a modified gene into white blood cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Isatuximab, Bendamustine, and Prednisone for the Treatment of Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine and how well it works when given together with isatuximab and prednisone for the treatment of multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with isatuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving isatuximab, bendamustine, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri