Clinical Trials Using BET Bromodomain Inhibitor ZEN-3694

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying BET Bromodomain Inhibitor ZEN-3694. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-3 of 3
  • A Study of ZEN003694 and Talazoparib in Patients With Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This is two-part open label, non-randomized, Phase 2, study of ZEN003694 in combination with Talazoparib in patients with TNBC without germline mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2. Part 1 is dose escalation and Part 2 is a Simon 2-Stage design
    Location: 4 locations

  • Continuation Protocol for ZEN003694 in Patients Experiencing Clinical Benefit While Enrolled in a ZEN003694 Protocol

    Continuation Protocol for ZEN003694 in Patients Experiencing Clinical Benefit While Enrolled in a ZEN003694 Protocol
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • ZEN-3694, Enzalutamide, and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates how well ZEN-3694, enzalutamide, and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). ZEN-3694 blocks the expression of the MYC gene to prevent cellular growth in certain types of tumors, including castrate resistant prostate cancer. Enzalutamide has been shown to block testosterone from reaching prostate cancer cells by binding to a receptor on prostate cancer cells, called androgen receptors. This works similar to a lock and key. When enzalutamide (key) inserts into the androgen receptor (lock) testosterone cannot attach to the androgen receptor, which slows the growth of tumor cells and may cause them to shrink. Pembrolizumab is a monoclonal antibody (proteins that can protect the body from foreign organisms, such as bacteria and viruses) designed to block a specific control switch which may be activated by tumor cells to overcome the body’s natural immune system defenses. It also enhances the activity of the body’s immune cells against tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to find out the effects ZEN-3694, enzalutamide, and pembrolizumab on patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have previously experienced disease progression.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California