Clinical Trials Using Bosutinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Bosutinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-6 of 6
  • Testing the Addition of Ruxolitinib to the Usual Treatment (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors) for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate, and bosutnib, dasatinib, or nilotinib, work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells produce a protein called BCR-ABL. The BCR-ABL protein helps chronic myeloid leukemia cells to grow and divide. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as bosutinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, stop the BCR-ABL protein from working, which helps to reduce the amount of chronic myeloid leukemia cells in the body. Ruxolitinib is a different type of drug that helps to stop the body from making substances called growth factors. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells need growth factors to grow and divide. The addition of ruxolitinib to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor may or may not help reduce the amount of chronic myeloid leukemia cells in the body.
    Location: 506 locations

  • Testing Pembrolizumab with Existing Cancer Therapy in Patients with Evidence of Residual Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and persistent detection of minimal residual disease, defined as the levels of a gene product called bcr-abl in the blood. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, and bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared to dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib alone.
    Location: 234 locations

  • Ruxolitinib and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Recurrent Chronic Phase-Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib, work in treating patients who are attempting to stop TKI medications for a second time for chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent). Ruxolitinib and imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. The purpose of this trial is to see if adding ruxolitinib to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib works better in prolonging treatment-free remission in patients with chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Combination with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the activity and side effects of blinatumomab in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and corticosteroids in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blinatumomab is a bispecific antibody that binds to two different proteins—one on the surface of cancer cells and one on the surface of cells in the immune system. An antibody is a protein made by the immune system to help fight infections and other harmful processes / cells / molecules. Blinatumomab may bind to the cancer cell and a T cell (which plays a key role in the immune system's fighting response) at the same time. Blinatumomab may strengthen the immune system's ability to fight cancer cells by activating the body's own immune cells to destroy the tumor. TKI therapy may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Corticosteroids are naturally occurring hormones that have immune suppressive effect and are used to treat some side effects of cancer and its treatment. Giving blinatumomab in combination with corticosteroid and TKI therapy may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to corticosteroid and TKI therapy alone.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Palbociclib, Bosutinib, and Fulvestrant for the Treatment of Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Refractory to Aromatase Inhibitors

    This trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosutinib and palbociclib when given together with fulvestrant in treating patients with hormone receptor positive and HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and does not respond to aromatase inhibitor therapy (refractory to aromatase inhibitors). Bosutinib and palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. This study is being done because it is not known if this combination therapy can be safely used at effective doses, preventing or postponing the need to start treatment with chemotherapy.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Bosutinib and Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosutinib when given together with inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells. Giving bosutinib together with inotuzumab ozogamicin may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas