Clinical Trials Using Carboplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carboplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 256
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  • Testing the Addition of a Type of Drug Called Immunotherapy to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, ALCHEMIST Chemo-IO Study

    This phase III ALCHEMIST trial compares the addition of pembrolizumab to usual chemotherapy versus usual chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IB, II, or IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, pemetrexed, carboplatin, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to find out if the addition of pembrolizumab to usual chemotherapy is better or worse than usual chemotherapy alone for non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 976 locations

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel with or without Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide is more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 1098 locations

  • Testing the Timing of Pembrolizumab Alone or With Chemotherapy as First Line Treatment and Maintenance in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase III trial studies whether pembrolizumab alone as a first-line treatment, followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab after disease progression is superior to induction with pembrolizumab, pemetrexed and carboplatin followed by pembrolizumab and pemetrexed maintenance in treating patients with stage IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving first-line pembrolizumab followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab works better in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell cancer.
    Location: 948 locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Antibody to Standard Chemoradiation followed by the Antibody for One Year to Standard Chemoradiation followed by One Year of the Antibody in Patients with Unresectable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well an antibody (durvalumab) with chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation) works in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to see if adding durvalumab to standard chemoradiation followed by additional durvalumab can extend patients life and / or prevent the tumor from coming back compared to the usual approach of chemoradiation alone followed by durvalumab.
    Location: 661 locations

  • Letrozole with or without Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well letrozole with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin works in treating patients with stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum. Letrozole is an enzyme inhibitor that lowers the amount of estrogen made by the body which in turn may stop the growth of tumor cells that need estrogen to grow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving letrozole alone or in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin works better in treating patients with low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum compared to paclitaxel and carboplatin without letrozole.
    Location: 597 locations

  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 475 locations

  • Chemoradiation with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II / III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation) with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemoradiation with or without atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 434 locations

  • Testing the Addition of Nivolumab to Chemotherapy for Patients with Metastatic Anal Cancer

    This phase III trial compares the addition of nivolumab to chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) versus usual treatment (chemotherapy alone) for the treatment of anal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab together with carboplatin and paclitaxel may help doctors find out if the treatment is better or the same as the usual approach.
    Location: 386 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II / III trial studies the usefulness of treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab in addition to standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma who are undergoing surgery. Immunotherapy with antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may remove the brake on the body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may reduce the tumor size and the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed during surgery. A combined treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy might be more effective in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma who are undergoing surgery.
    Location: 334 locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Immune Therapy Drug (Nivolumab) to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin or Carboplatin with Gemcitabine) for Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    This phase III trial compares the effect of adding nivolumab to the usual chemotherapy (cisplatin or carboplatin with gemcitabine) versus standard chemotherapy alone in treating patients with nasopharyngeal cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab with the usual chemotherapy may work better than the standard chemotherapy alone in treating patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.
    Location: 284 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Thymic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab work in treating patients with thymic cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), has come back (recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab will work better in treating patients with thymic cancer.
    Location: 261 locations

  • Testing the Effects of MK-3475 (Pembrolizumab) with or without the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment for Patients 70 Years of Age and Older with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab with or without chemotherapy in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer that has come back (recurrent) and has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab with or without chemotherapy may shrink the tumor in older patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 246 locations

  • Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
    Location: 187 locations

  • Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults with Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery

    This partially randomized phase II / III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 171 locations

  • Testing the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Pembrolizumab to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Paclitaxel and Carboplatin) in Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well the combination of pembrolizumab, paclitaxel and carboplatin works compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III or IV, or has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Paclitaxel and carboplatin are chemotherapy drugs used as part of the usual treatment approach for this type of cancer. This study aims to assess if adding immunotherapy to these drugs is better or worse than the usual approach for treatment of this cancer.
    Location: 220 locations

  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: 141 locations

  • Evaluation of Dosing Procedures of Chemotherapy Treatment (Carboplatin) with the Contrast Agent Iohexol

    This trial studies how well iohexol works in helping doctors calculate the dose of carboplatin given to patients with cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Understanding how to best calculate the dose of carboplatin given to patients with cancer may help doctors learn how to improve the use of carboplatin in the future.
    Location: 149 locations

  • Chemotherapy before Surgery and Radiation Therapy or Surgery and Radiation Therapy Alone in Treating Patients with Nasal and Paranasal Sinus Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy before surgery and radiation therapy works compared to surgery and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with nasal and paranasal sinus cancer that can be removed by surgery. Chemotherapy drugs, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy before surgery and radiation therapy may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed and treated with radiation.
    Location: 129 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy with or without Additional Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk Early-Stage Cervical Cancer after Radical Hysterectomy

    This randomized phase III trial is studying chemotherapy and pelvic radiation therapy to see how well they work when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating patients with high-risk early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy and radiation therapy are more effective when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating cervical cancer.
    Location: 149 locations

  • A Study of Combination Chemotherapy for Patients with Newly Diagnosed DAWT and Relapsed FHWT

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumors (DAWT) or favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWT) that have come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy regimens such as UH-3 (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan) and ICE / Cyclo / Topo (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, and topotecan) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial may help doctors find out what effects, good and / or bad, regimen UH-3 has on patients with newly diagnosed DAWT and standard risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with only 2 drugs for the initial WT) and regimen ICE / Cyclo / Topo has on patients with high and very high risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with 3 or more drugs for the initial WT).
    Location: 95 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or did not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 65 locations

  • A Study of the Drugs Selumetinib vs. Carboplatin and Vincristine in Patients with Low-Grade Glioma

    This phase 3 trial compares the effect of selumetinib versus the standard of care treatment with carboplatin and vincristine (CV) in treating patients with newly diagnosed or previously untreated low-grade glioma (LGG) that does not have a genetic abnormality called BRAFV600E mutation and is not associated with systemic neurofibromatosis type 1. Selumetinib works by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may kill tumor cells. Carboplatin and vincristine are chemotherapy drugs that work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. The overall goal of this study is to see if selumetinib works just as well as the standard treatment of CV for patients with LGG. Another goal of this study is to compare the effects of selumetinib versus CV in subjects with LGG to find out which is better. Additionally, this trial will also examine if treatment with selumetinib improves the quality of life for subjects who take it.
    Location: 87 locations

  • A Study of the Drugs Selumetinib versus Carboplatin / Vincristine in Patients with Neurofibromatosis and Low-Grade Glioma

    This phase III trial studies if selumetinib works just as well as the standard treatment with carboplatin / vincristine (CV) for subjects with NF1-associated low grade glioma (LGG), and to see if selumetinib is better than CV in improving vision in subjects with LGG of the optic pathway (vision nerves). Selumetinib is a drug that works by blocking some enzymes that low-grade glioma tumor cells need for their growth. This results in killing tumor cells. Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and vincristine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether selumetinib works better in treating patients with NF1-associated low-grade glioma compared to standard therapy with carboplatin and vincristine.
    Location: 86 locations

  • Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 57 locations

  • A Study of Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Compared to Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy plus MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) Immunotherapy for Bladder Cancer Which has Spread to the Lymph Nodes (The INSPIRE Study)

    This phase II trial studies the benefit of adding an immunotherapy drug called MEDI4736 (durvalumab) to standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating bladder cancer which has spread to the lymph nodes. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with durvalumab may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy with the addition of durvalumab may work better in helping tumors respond to treatment compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone. Patients with limited regional lymph node involvement may benefit from attempt at bladder preservation, and use of immunotherapy and systemic chemotherapy.
    Location: 172 locations


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