Clinical Trials Using Carfilzomib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carfilzomib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 36
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  • Efficacy and Safety Study of bb2121 Versus Standard Regimens in Subjects With Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM)

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase 3 study comparing the efficacy and safety of bb2121 versus standard regimens in subjects with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). The study is anticipated to randomize approximately 381 subjects with RRMM. Approximately 254 subjects will be randomized to Treatment Arm A and approximately 127 subjects will be randomized to Treatment Arm B.
    Location: 29 locations

  • A Study to Determine Dose, Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of CC-220 Monotherapy, and in Combination With Other Treatments in Subjects With Multiple Myeloma

    This is a multicenter, multi-country, open-label, Phase 1b / 2a dose-escalation study consisting of two parts: dose escalation (Part 1) for CC-220 monotherapy, CC-220 in combination with DEX, CC-220 in combination with DEX and DARA, CC-220 in combination with DEX and BTZ and CC-220 in combination with DEX and CFZ; and the expansion of the RP2D (Part 2) for CC-220 in combination with DEX for Relapsed Refractory Multiple Myeloma and CC-220 in combination with DEX and BTZ for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, Daratumumab, Melphalan, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 13 locations

  • A Study to Determine the Recommended Dose and Regimen and Evaluate the Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of CC-92480 in Combination With Standard Treatments in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM) and Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM)

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1 / 2 study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) / recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of CC-92480 in combination with standard treatments.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Study of Carfilzomib in Combination With Induction Chemotherapy in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    The purpose of Phase 1b of this study is to: - Asses the safety, tolerability and activity of carfilzomib, alone and in combination with induction chemotherapy, in children with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). - Determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to recommend a phase 2 dose of carfilzomib in combination with induction chemotherapy. The purpose of Phase 2 of this study is to compare the rate of complete response (CR) of carfilzomib in combination with vincristine, dexamethasone, PEG asparaginase, daunorubicin (VXLD) at the end of induction therapy to an appropriate external control.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial compares the safety and activity of the combination of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRD), or carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone and daratumumab (KRD+DARA) with the usual treatment composed of lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (VRD) for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. It may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. This study will measure the amount of myeloma cells that remain in the body after treatment with the study drugs, described as minimal residual disease (MRD). Studies show that having no remaining multiple myeloma cells or a low number of these cells (MRD negativity) is associated with better clinical outcomes. This study compares the results of the usual treatment (VRD) with those of KRD or KRD+DARA to see which treatment is safer and results in more patients achieving MRD negativity.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Selinexor and Backbone Treatments of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    This study will independently assess the efficacy and safety of 10 combination therapies in 11 arms, in dose-escalation / -evaluation and expansion phases, for the treatment of patients with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM). The combinations to be evaluated are: - Arm 1: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide (SPd) - Arm 2: Selinexor + dexamethasone + bortezomib (SVd); enrollment complete - Arm 3: Selinexor + dexamethasone + lenalidomide (SRd) in RRMM; enrollment complete - Arm 4: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide + bortezomib (SPVd) - Arm 5: Selinexor + dexamethasone + daratumumab (SDd); enrollment complete - Arm 6: Selinexor + dexamethasone + carfilzomib (SKd) - Arm 7: Selinexor + dexamethasone + lenalidomide (SRd) in NDMM - Arm 8: Selinexor + dexamethasone + ixazomib (SNd) - Arm 9: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide + elotuzumab (SPEd) - Arm 10: Selinexor + dexamethasone + belantamab mafodotin (SBd) - Arm 11: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide + daratumumab (SDPd) Selinexor pharmacokinetics: - PK Run-in (Days 1-14): Starting in protocol version 8.0, patients enrolled to any arm in the Dose Escalation Phase (i.e., Arm 4 [SPVd], Arm 6 [SKd], Arm 8 [SNd], Arm 9 [SPEd], Arm 10 [SBd], and Arm 11 [SDPd]) will also first be enrolled to a pharmacokinetics (PK) Run-in period until 9 patients have been enrolled to this period to evaluate the PK of selinexor before and after co-administration with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Aggressive Smoldering Curative Approach Evaluating Novel Therapies and Transplant

    This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, daratumumab, and dexamethasone in subjects with high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). Subjects will receive treatment in 3 phases - induction (6 cycles), consolidation (6 cycles), and maintenance (12 cycles). Each cycle is 28 days.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Testing the Addition of KRT-232 (AMG 232) to Usual Chemotherapy for Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MDM2 Inhibitor KRT-232 when given together with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patient with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). KRT-232 (AMG 232) may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called MDM2 that is needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide help shrink or slow the growth of multiple myeloma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving MDM2 Inhibitor KRT-232, lenalidomide, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone together may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Isatuximab for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed, Transplant-Eligible Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial investigates how well carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and isatuximab work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who are eligible for a transplant. Carfilzomib may work by inhibiting (blocking) multiple myeloma cells from breaking down proteins within the cells, causing a buildup of proteins within multiple myeloma cells, that may lead to cell death. Lenalidomide may work in many ways of attacking tumor cells including activating the immune system against the tumor, and increasing tumor cell death, and decreasing tumor blood vessel growth. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs to treat and kill some types of cancer. Isatuximab is a monoclonal antibody. An antibody is a protein produced in the blood to fight diseases by attacking and killing harmful foreign organisms such as bacteria and viruses. In some diseases, like cancer, the antibody will protect the patient by attaching itself to a target molecule inside the body, which is also a protein. Isatuximab will attach itself to a protein called CD38 located on the surface of immune cells and some cancer cells in the body and can induce the killing of those cells. Giving carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and isatuximab may help treat patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of daratumumab and how well it works in combination with carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Daratumumab is a type of antibody (a protein that attaches to other cells to fight off infection) that works by attaching to the CD38 molecule which is expressed in multiple myeloma cells. By attaching to the CD38 molecule, daratumumab may cause cell death. Carfilzomib is a type of inhibitor that works by inhibiting (blocking) multiple myeloma cells from breaking down proteins within the cells. This may cause a buildup of proteins within multiple myeloma cells, which may lead to cell death. Pomalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (it affects the immune system) that works by affecting the growth signals that keep cancer cells alive. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid (a type of steroid) that may kill cancer cells. Giving daratumumab in combination with carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • CB-839 HCl in Combination with Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of CB-839 HCl when given together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to previous treatment. CB-839 HCl and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CB-839 HCl, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Study of Venetoclax in Combination With Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    A Phase 2, open-label, dose escalation study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of venetoclax in combination with carfilzomib-dexamethasone (Kd) in participants with relapsed or refractory MM and have received at least 1 prior line of therapy. Part 4 of this study is currently enrolling.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Carfilzomib in Combination With Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide for Children

    This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide for children with relapsed / refractory solid tumors or leukemia. The medications cyclophosphamide and etoposide are standard drugs often used together for the treatment of cancer in children with solid tumors or leukemia. Carfilzomib is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved in the United States for adults with multiple myeloma (a type of cancer). However, this drug is not approved for the disease being treated in this study. Since carfilzomib has not yet been used in this setting to treat this condition, the investigators must first find the best dose to give. The investigators are looking for the highest dose of carfilzomib that can be given safely. Therefore, not all children taking part in this study will receive the same dose of the study drug in the first part of the trial.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Isatuximab and Carfilzomib with or without Dexamethasone and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of isatuximab when given together with carfilzomib with or without dexamethasone and lenalidomide in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not respond to previous treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as isatuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone and lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving isatuximab and carfilzomib with or without dexamethasone and lenalidomide may be a better treatment for patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Trial of TTI-622 in Patients With Advanced Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Myeloma

    Multicenter, open-label, phase 1a / 1b Dose Escalation and Expansion Trial of TTI-622 in Patients with Advanced Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Selinexor, Carfilzomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor and carfilzomib when given together with dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as selinexor and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving selinexor, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib and to see how well it works when given together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Pomalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Daratumumab Retreatment in Participants With Multiple Myeloma Who Have Been Previously Treated With Daratumumab Intravenous (Dara-IV)

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy (rate of very good partial response [VGPR] or better as best response as defined by the International Myeloma Working Group [IMWG] criteria) of daratumumab subcutaneous (Dara-SC) in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone (Kd) with the efficacy of Kd in participants with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma who were previously exposed to daratumumab intravenous (Dara-IV) to evaluate daratumumab retreatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Dexamethasone, Carfilzomib, and Nivolumab with Pelareorep in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pelareorep when given together with dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. A virus, called pelareorep, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells. Giving dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab with pelareorep may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cabozantinib in Treating Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma Resistant to Carfilzomib

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose cabozantinib and how well it works when given together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that does not respond treatment (refractory) and is resistant to carfilzomib. Cabozantinib and carfilzomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving cabozantinib together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone may reverse the resistance to carfilzomib.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Wild-Type Reovirus in Combination with Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of wild-type reovirus when combined with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back following treatment (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as dexamethasone and carfilzomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A virus called wild-type reovirus may be able to kill cancer cells without damaging normal cells and seems to work best when given with chemotherapy. Giving wild-type reovirus with chemotherapy may be a more effective treatment than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known if carfilzomib in combination with rituximab and combination chemotherapy is better or worse than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carfilzomib-Based Chemotherapy before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib-based chemotherapy before stem cell transplant in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib is a type of drug called a proteasome inhibitor. A proteasome is a protein found within cells that has the important role of identifying and marking damaged proteins that are needed to be destroyed by the cell for survival. The inhibition of the proteasome allows for damaged protein to accumulate within cells. This accumulation of damaged protein causes the cell to die. Giving chemotherapy before a transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Giving certain chemotherapy drugs, such as carfilzomib, dexamethasone, and cyclophosphamide, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • LCI-HEM-MYE-CRD-004 (MMRC-073 CARJAK): Study of CRD for Carfilzomib-Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    The primary objective of Phase I is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of ruxolitinib in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone. The primary objective of phase II is to evaluate progression-free survival (PFS) at 4 months in multiple myeloma subjects who receive the combination treatment carfilzomib, dexamethasone, and ruxolitinib.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan


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