Clinical Trials Using Carfilzomib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carfilzomib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-37 of 37

  • Panobinostat, Carfilzomib, and Dexamethasone in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Panobinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Using multiple myeloma cells from patients’ blood samples, the researchers will do laboratory tests to look at how well each of the drugs, alone and in different combinations, kill multiple myeloma cells. If the laboratory tests work well, they may be used in the future to help plan treatment for future patients.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Carfilzomib and Umbralisib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose and side effects of carfilzomib and umbralisib and how well they work in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Carfilzomib and umbralisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known if carfilzomib in combination with rituximab and combination chemotherapy is better or worse than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Stage I-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage I-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or that has not responded to treatment (refractory). Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, also work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide may be a better treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Study of Carfilzomib With Irinotecan in Irinotecan-Sensitive Malignancies and Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine a well-tolerated dose of Carfilzomib in combination with Irinotecan (Phase 1b portion of the study) in subjects with relapsed small and non-small cell lung cancer or other irinotecan-sensitive cancers and to assess the 6 month survival of relapsed small cell lung cancer patients treated with this combination therapy. **The Phase 1b portion of the study is now complete**. Phase 2 portion of the study. The safest, maximally tolerated dose established as established in Phase 1 for Phase 2 is as follows -- Carfilzomib will be provided at 20 / 36 mg / m2 with Irinotecan dosed at 125 mg / m2. The purpose of the Phase 2 portion of the study is to assess 6 month survival of relapsed small cell lung cancer ins subjects treated with this combination therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Carfilzomib with or without Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Stage IA-IVB Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of carfilzomib when given together with or without romidepsin in treating patients with stage IA-IVB cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib and romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving carfilzomib alone is more effective than when given together with romidepsin.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Safety and Efficacy Study of Carfilzomib and Pomalidomide With Dexamethasone in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This is a dose finding pilot study to evaluate the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose of the combination of carfilzomib and pomalidomide with dexamethasone (CPD) in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma followed by a phase II expansion at the MTD to evaluate efficacy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study to Determine the Recommended Dose and Regimen and Evaluate the Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of CC-92480 in Combination With Standard Treatments in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM) and Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM)

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1 / 2 study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) / recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of CC-92480 in combination with standard treatments.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Isatuximab and Carfilzomib with or without Dexamethasone and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of isatuximab when given together with carfilzomib with or without dexamethasone and lenalidomide in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not respond to previous treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as isatuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone and lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving isatuximab and carfilzomib with or without dexamethasone and lenalidomide may be a better treatment for patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Wild-type Reovirus in Combination with Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This pilot phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of wild-type reovirus when combined with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back following treatment (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone and carfilzomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A virus called wild-type reovirus may be able to kill cancer cells without damaging normal cells and seems to work best when given with chemotherapy. Giving wild-type reovirus with chemotherapy may be a more effective treatment than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Whole Body-MRI or PET Scan and Image-Guided Biopsy in Assessing Response in Participants with Multiple Myeloma Receiving Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone

    This phase II trial studies how well whole body-magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET) and image-guided biopsy work in assessing response in participants with multiple myeloma receiving carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone. Diagnostic procedures, such as MRI and PET, may help measure a participant's response to treatment. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. WB-MRI or PET and image-guided biopsy may improve response assessment strategy after chemotherapy in participants with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut