Clinical Trials Using Carfilzomib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carfilzomib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 39
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  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, Daratumumab, Melphalan, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 13 locations

  • A Study to Determine Dose and Tolerability of CC-220 Monotherapy, in Combination With Dexamethasone, and in Combination With Dexamethasone and Daratumumab or Bortezomib in Subjects With Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    This is a multicenter, multi-country, open-label, Phase 1b / 2a dose-escalation study consisting of two parts: dose escalation (Part 1) for CC-220 MonoT, CC-220 in combination with DEX, CC-220 in combination with DEX and DARA, CC-220 in combination with DEX and BTZ and CC-220 in combination with DEX and CFZ; and the expansion of the RP2D (Part 2) for CC-220 MonoT and CC-220 in combination with DEX (DoubleT).
    Location: 13 locations

  • Study of Carfilzomib in Combination With Induction Chemotherapy in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    The purpose of the study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose and assess the safety, tolerability and activity of carfilzomib, alone and in combination with induction chemotherapy, in children with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 11 locations

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Selinexor and Backbone Treatments of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    This study will independently assess the efficacy and safety of six combination therapies for the treatment of patients with Relapsed / Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RR MM) and Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM). The combinations to be evaluated include: selinexor + pomalidomide + dexamethasone (SPd), selinexor + bortezomib + dexamethasone (SVd), selinexor + lenalidomide + dexamethasone (SRd), selinexor + pomalidomide + dexamethasone + bortezomib (SPVd), selinexor + daratumumab + dexamethasone (SDd), and selinexor + carfilzomib + dexamethasone (SKd). The abbreviations for combination treatments have been revised to use V (Velcade) for bortezomib, R (Revlimid) for lenalidomide, D (Darzalex) for daratumumab, and K (Kyprolis) for carfilzomib.
    Location: 6 locations

  • CB-839 HCl in Combination with Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of CB-839 HCl when given together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to previous treatment. CB-839 HCl and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CB-839 HCl, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Aggressive Smoldering Curative Approach Evaluating Novel Therapies and Transplant

    This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, daratumumab, and dexamethasone in subjects with high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). Subjects will receive treatment in 3 phases - induction (6 cycles), consolidation (6 cycles), and maintenance (12 cycles). Each cycle is 28 days.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Dexamethasone, Lenalidomide, Carfilzomib, and Daratumumab in Treating Participants with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well dexamethasone, lenalidomide, carfilzomib, and daratumumab work in treating participants with multiple myeloma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, lenalidomide, and carfilzomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving dexamethasone, lenalidomide, carfilzomib, and daratumumab may work better in treating participants with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Subcutaneous Daratumumab in Combination With Standard Multiple Myeloma Treatment Regimens

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical benefit of subcutaneous (SC) daratumumab administered in combination with standard multiple myeloma (MM) regimens in participants with MM as measured by overall response rate (ORR) or very good partial response (VGPR) or better rate.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Lenalidomide with or without Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma after Stem-Cell Transplant

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well lenalidomide with or without carfilzomib and dexamethasone works in treating patients with multiple myeloma after stem-cell transplant. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. It may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Dexamethasone is a drug used to reduce inflammation and lower the body’s immune response. Giving lenalidomide together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone may be an effective treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carfilzomib in Combination With Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide for Children

    This study evaluates the use of carfilzomib in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide for children with relapsed / refractory solid tumors or leukemia. The medications cyclophosphamide and etoposide are standard drugs often used together for the treatment of cancer in children with solid tumors or leukemia. Carfilzomib is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved in the United States for adults with multiple myeloma (a type of cancer). However, this drug is not approved for the disease being treated in this study. Since carfilzomib has not yet been used in this setting to treat this condition, the investigators must first find the best dose to give. The investigators are looking for the highest dose of carfilzomib that can be given safely. Therefore, not all children taking part in this study will receive the same dose of the study drug in the first part of the trial.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Trial of TTI-622 in Patients With Advanced Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Myeloma

    Multicenter, open-label, phase 1a / 1b Dose Escalation and Expansion Trial of TTI-622 in Patients with Advanced Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • MDM2 Inhibitor AMG-232, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 when given together with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patient with multiple myeloma that has come back of has not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Selinexor, Carfilzomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor and carfilzomib when given together with dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as selinexor and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving selinexor, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with bendamustine hydrochloride and rituximab in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or has not responded to previous treatment. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving carfilzomib together with bendamustine hydrochloride and rituximab may be a better treatment for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib and to see how well it works when given together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Pomalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Dexamethasone, Carfilzomib, and Nivolumab with Pelareorep in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pelareorep when given together with dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. A virus, called pelareorep, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells. Giving dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab with pelareorep may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cabozantinib in Treating Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma Resistant to Carfilzomib

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose cabozantinib and how well it works when given together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that does not respond treatment and is resistant to carfilzomib. Cabozantinib and carfilzomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cabozantinib together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone may reverse the resistance to carfilzomib.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Elotuzumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low Dose Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low dose dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of Venetoclax in Combination With Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    A Phase 2, open-label, dose escalation study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of venetoclax in combination with carfilzomib-dexamethasone (Kd) in participants with relapsed or refractory MM and have received 1 to 3 prior lines of therapy.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone for Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    Background: - Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects the plasma cells. These cells help produce antibodies and fight infection. Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is a related condition that may develop into multiple myeloma. The current standard of care for SMM is close follow-up without treatment until multiple myeloma develops. However, researchers are studying possible treatments for SMM itself. One possible treatment involves a combination of cancer treatment drugs. - Lenalidomide is a drug that may help reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. Dexamethasone is a steroid that is often given with other anti-cancer drugs. These two drugs are an approved treatment for multiple myeloma that has not responded to at least one other treatment. Carfilzomib is an experimental drug that has been effective in treating multiple myeloma. Researchers want to combine these three drugs to see if they are a safe and effective treatment for SMM. Objectives: - To see if carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone are a safe and effective treatment for smoldering multiple myeloma. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have SMM that is likely to progress to multiple myeloma. Design: - Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. They will also have blood and urine tests, and baseline bone marrow scans. Bone marrow samples will also be collected. - Participants will have eight 28-day cycles of treatment with the three study drugs. The drugs will be given as tablets or as infusions. Treatment will be monitored with frequent blood tests and study visits. - After the first four cycles, participants who are eligible for a stem cell transplant will have their stem cells collected and stored for future use. - At the end of eight cycles, participants whose disease has not progressed will have up to 12 more cycles of treatment with lenalidomide tablets alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Daratumumab Retreatment in Participants With Multiple Myeloma Who Have Been Previously Treated With Daratumumab Intravenous (Dara-IV)

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy (rate of very good partial response [VGPR] or better as best response as defined by the International Myeloma Working Group [IMWG] criteria) of daratumumab subcutaneous (Dara-SC) in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone (Kd) with the efficacy of Kd in participants with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma who were previously exposed to daratumumab intravenous (Dara-IV) to evaluate daratumumab retreatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with high-risk multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Carfilzomib or Bortezomib with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma, COBRA Study

    This phase III trial studies how well carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone work compared to bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low-dose Dexamethasone in Treating Participants with Newly-diagnosed, Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone work in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes need for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone may work better in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois


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