Clinical Trials Using Cisplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cisplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 176-192 of 192
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  • Testing the Addition of MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) to Chemotherapy before Surgery for Patients with High-Grade Upper Urinary Tract Cancer

    This phase III trial compares the effect of adding durvalumab to chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone before surgery in treating patients with upper urinary tract cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and gemcitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Durvalumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may enhance the shrinking of the tumor compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Chemo-Immunotherapy Followed by Durvalumab and Ceralasertib in Treatment Naïve Patients With Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The primary objective of this single arm study is to estimate the progression free survival of previously-untreated patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer. Patients will receive initial chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance therapy with durvalumab and oral ceralasertib.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Perioperative Enfortumab Vedotin (EV) Plus Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Versus Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Cisplatin-eligible Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (MIBC) (MK-3475-B15 / KEYNOTE-B15 / EV-304)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the antitumor efficacy and safety of perioperative enfortumab vedotin (EV) plus pembrolizumab and radical cystectomy (RC) + pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) compared with the current standard of care (neoadjuvant chemotherapy [gemcitabine plus cisplatin] and RC + PLND) for participants with MIBC who are cisplatin-eligible. The dual primary hypotheses are preoperative EV + pembrolizumab and RC + PLND (Arm A) will achieve superior pathologic complete response (pCR) rate and perioperative EV and pembrolizumab and RC + PLND (Arm A) will achieve superior event free survival (EFS) compared with neoadjuvant gemcitabine + cisplatin and RC + PLND (Arm B).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer and Peritoneal Metastasis

    This phase II trial studies the effects of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to the internal abdominal area (peritoneal metastasis). Chemotherapy drugs, such as mitomycin and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. HIPEC involves “heated” chemotherapy that is placed directly in the abdomen through laparoscopic instruments, instead of through an intravenous injection. This study may help doctors determine how safe and effective HIPEC work in treating patient with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Acetylcysteine for the Mitigation of Chemotherapy-Related Cognitive Impairment in Ovarian Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum-Based Therapy

    This phase I / II trial identifies the side effects and best dose of acetylcysteine and how well it works in reducing chemotherapy-related cognitive impairments in patients receiving platinum-based therapy (carboplatin or cisplatin) for ovarian cancer. Acetylcysteine is a dietary supplement that may lessen or slow down cognitive impairment such as changes in memory, attention and problem-solving. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving acetylcysteine in combination with carboplatin or cisplatin may lessen or prevent chemotherapy-related cognitive impairments in patients receiving platinum-based therapy for ovarian cancer.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • ADMIRAL Trial: Adaptive Mediastinal Radiation with Chemo-Immunotherapy

    This phase II trial studies two questions in patients with stage III NSCLC: 1) does it improve cancer control to add the drug Durvalumab, a type of immunotherapy, earlier in the treatment course; and 2) by intensifying treatment with durvalumab, is it possible to avoid mediastinal radiation to decrease side effects, without decreasing cancer control?
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Restorative Microbiota Therapy in Combination with Durvalumab with or without Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage IIIB-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect, safety and tolerability of restorative microbiota therapy (RMT) in combination with durvalumab with or without chemotherapy in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. RMT is prepared by extracting healthy bacteria from the stool of healthy human donors while rigorously testing samples for harmful bacteria and viruses before processing. The extract is then made into capsules which is taken by mouth. RMT may make immunotherapy more effective. Durvalumab is a type of anti-cancer therapy called immunotherapy that uses the patient’s own immune system to attack tumor cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, pemetrexed, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving RMT may make durvalumab treatment with or without chemotherapy more effective in controlling stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Standard Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating HIV-Positive Women with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy given with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin work in treating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women with cervical cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy to the pelvis destroys potential cancer cells in the pelvic area and significantly reduces the risk of tumor recurrence in the pelvic area. It is not yet known if giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin, may work better in treating HIV-positive patients with advanced cervical cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
    Location: 141 locations

  • Heated Cisplatin following Surgery in Treating Younger Patients with Primary or Metastatic Pleural Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of hyperthermic (heated) cisplatin following surgery in treating younger patients with primary pleural malignancies or pleural malignancies that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating cisplatin to several degrees above normal body temperature and infusing it into the area around the tumor after surgery may kill more tumor cells and may help lower the risk of the tumor coming back.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Sodium Thiosulfate for the Prevention of Ototoxicity in Patients with Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Undergoing Chemoradiation with Cisplatin

    This phase II trial investigates how well sodium thiosulfate works in preventing ototoxicity (hearing loss / damage) in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) who are undergoing a chemoradiation. Sodium thiosulfate is a type of medication used to treat cyanide poisoning and to help lessen the side effects from cisplatin. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. The purpose of this trial is to find out whether it is feasible to give sodium thiosulfate 4 hours after each cisplatin infusion along with standard of care radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Giving sodium thiosulfate after cisplatin may help decrease the risk of hearing loss.
    Location: University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

  • D-limonene, Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin for the Prevention of Xerostomia in Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects of d-limonene given together with radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Xerostomia (dry mouth) is the most common late side effect from radiation therapy. D-limonene is a dietary supplement that activates an enzyme which may stimulate salivary cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving d-limonene together with radiation therapy and cisplatin may prevent or improve radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Genetic Testing in Screening Patients with Stage IB-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial)

    This ALCHEMIST trial studies genetic testing in screening patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been or will be removed by surgery. Studying the genes in a patient’s tumor cells may help doctors select the best treatment for patients that have certain genetic changes.
    Location: 1424 locations

  • Pulmonary Suffusion in Controlling Minimal Residual Disease in Patients with Soft Tissue or Bone Sarcoma Metastatic to the Lungs

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of pulmonary suffusion in controlling minimal residual disease in patients with soft tissue or bone sarcoma that has spread to the lungs (metastatic). Pulmonary suffusion is a minimally invasive delivery of chemotherapeutic agents like cisplatin to lung tissues. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pulmonary suffusion may also be useful in avoiding later use of drugs by vein that demonstrate no effect on tumors when delivered locally.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pre-treatment Biopsy Results in Predicting Response in Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Triple Negative Breast Cancer after Treatment with Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well the results of a pre-treatment biopsy work in predicting response in patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or has come back after treatment (recurrent) with cisplatin and radiation therapy. A biopsy is where a tissue is removed from the body and examined under a microscope to determine whether disease is present. Studying tissue collected during pre-treatment biopsies in the laboratory may help determine the ability of the tumor to repair itself after being treated with chemotherapy (cisplatin) and radiation therapy and predict how well these treatments work for future patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Individualized Response Assessment to Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) for the Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis From Ovarian, Colorectal, Appendiceal, or Peritoneal Mesothelioma Histologies

    Background: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) removes tumors in the abdomen. HIPEC is heated chemotherapy that washes the abdomen. CRS and HIPEC may help people with peritoneal carcinomatosis. These are tumors that have spread to the lining of the abdomen from other cancers. Researchers think they can improve results of CRS and HIPEC by choosing the chemotherapy drugs used in HIPEC. Objective: To see if HIPEC after CRS can be improved, by testing different chemotherapy drugs, using a model called the SMART (Sample Microenvironment of Resected Metastatic Tumor) System. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have peritoneal carcinomatosis that cannot be fully removed safely with surgery. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Computed tomography (CAT) scan Other imaging scans, as needed Electrocardiogram (EKG) Tumor biopsy, if needed Laparoscopy. Small cuts will be made in the abdomen. A tube with a light and a camera will be used to see their organs. Some screening tests will be repeated in the study. Participants will enroll in NIH protocol #13C0176. This allows their tumor samples to be used in future research. Participants will have CRS. As many of their visible tumors will be removed as possible. They will also have HIPEC. Two thin tubes will be put in their abdomen. They will get chemotherapy through one tube. It will be drained out through the other tube. They will be in the hospital for 7-21 days after surgery. Participants will give tumor, blood, and fluid samples for research. They will complete surveys about their health and quality of life. Participants will have follow-up visits over 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Impact of Anti-nausea Drugs on the Risk of Kidney Injury in Cancer Patients Receiving Cisplatin

    This phase III trial compares whether granisetron, ondansetron, or palonosetron can influence harm to the kidneys, whether cisplatin levels in the body can influence the risk of harm to the kidneys, and whether genetic make-up can increase or decrease the likelihood of kidney injury due to cisplatin therapy. Anti-nausea drugs, such as granisetron, ondansetron, or palonosetron, belong to a class of medications known as 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists or 5-HT3As and may prevent nausea due to cisplatin treatment. This study may help researchers learn more about the processes that increase the risk of kidney damage from cisplatin therapy.
    Location: 2 locations


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