Clinical Trials Using Clofarabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Clofarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • Study of a Geriatric Assessment to Plan a Treatment Approach for Older People with Various Blood Disorders

    This phase II trial studies whether a geriatric assessment may be helpful in determining the best treatment approach in older patients (age 60+) with myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms, or related blood disorders who are going to receive chemotherapy or another treatment to prepare the body for an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT). The geriatric assessment includes looking at patients’ cognitive function (thinking processes), physical function, mobility (ability to move the body), mood, nutrition, and current medications to help decide the type of treatment they’ll receive. Information from this study may help doctors better plan a treatment approach for older adults leading up to the stem cell transplant.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Children and Young Adults with Blood Cancers or Non-malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies the effect of chemotherapy and a cord blood transplant in children and young adults with hematologic malignancies or non-malignant diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Before receiving stem cells, the standard process, called cytoreduction, is to receive high doses of chemotherapy. This helps to make room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow, helps prevent the body from rejecting the transplanted cells, and helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body. This is called a conditioning regimen. However, high doses of chemotherapy can have serious side effects. This study may help researchers learn whether combining the chemotherapy drugs clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan is a safe and effective way to reduce the side effects from receiving a conditioning regimen in children and young adults receiving cord blood transplants.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia, or Double-Hit Lymphoma / Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia, or double-hit lymphoma / leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate liposome, dexamethasone and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant with Added Sugar and Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well an umbilical cord blood transplant with added sugar works with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The umbilical cord blood cells will be grown ("expanded") on a special layer of cells collected from the bone marrow of healthy volunteers in a laboratory. A type of sugar will also be added to the cells in the laboratory that may help the transplant to "take" faster.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Trial of the Combination of Bortezomib and Clofarabine in Adults With Relapsed Solid Tumors

    Background: - Researchers want to develop better ways to treat cancer. In this study, they will give people with cancer two drugs. These drugs have been used on their own to treat some blood cell cancers. Objectives: - To test the safety and efficacy of the drug combination of bortezomib and clofarabine. Eligibility: - Adults age 18 and over with advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment or that has no effective therapy. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and scans to measure their tumors. They will also have heart, blood, and urine tests. All of these may be done by their regular doctors. - Participants will get the study drugs in 21-day cyles. They will stay at the clinic for week 1 of every cycle, then have 2 weeks off. - Bortezomib will be injected under the skin on days 1 and 4. - Clofarabine will be injected in a vein for days 1-5. - During cycle 1 only, participants will go to the clinic or their doctor to have a physical exam and blood tests at the start of the second and third week. - Participants will have clinical evaluations throughout the study, including before receiving treatment and then before the start of each cycle. - Participants may stay in the study as long as they are tolerating the drugs and their tumor is not getting worse. - Participants will have follow-up for 30 days after the last dose of study drugs. - The first part of this study tests the safety of different doses of clofarabine and bortezomib. - The second part of this study involves a separate group of participants who will undergo mandatory research biopsies to learn more about the effects of clofarabine and bortezomib on cancer cells.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Clofarabine, Idarubicin, Cytarabine, Vincristine Sulfate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia that is newly diagnosed or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Clofarabine, and Busulfan before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine hydrochloride, clofarabine, and busulfan before donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma that does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy before Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Relapsed Aggressive B-cell or T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well vorinostat and combination chemotherapy before donor stem cell transplantation work in treating patients with aggressive B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed). Vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, gemcitabine, and clofarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving vorinostat together with combination chemotherapy before donor stem cell transplantation may help to control lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas