Clinical Trials Using Cytarabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cytarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 116
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  • A Comparison of Three Chemotherapy Regimens for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial compares three chemotherapy regimens consisting of bendamustine, rituximab, high dose cytarabine, and acalabrutinib and studies how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study is being done to find out if one the drug combinations of bendamustine, rituximab, high dose cytarabine, and acalabrutinib is better or worse than the usual approach for mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: 405 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults with Newly Diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as CD22 receptors, and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as [intervention], work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 298 locations

  • A Study to Investigate Blinatumomab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.
    Location: 193 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

    This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
    Location: 189 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 166 locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients with Down Syndrome

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.
    Location: 164 locations

  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 237 locations

  • A Study to Compare Standard Chemotherapy to Therapy with CPX-351 and / or Gilteritinib for Patients with Newly Diagnosed AML with or without FLT3 Mutations

    This phase III trial compares standard chemotherapy to therapy with CPX-351 and / or gilteritinib for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia with or without FLT3 mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin, cytarabine, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. CPX-351 is made up of daunorubicin and cytarabine and is made in a way that makes the drugs stay in the bone marrow longer and could be less likely to cause heart problems than traditional anthracycline drugs, a common class of chemotherapy drug. Some acute myeloid leukemia patients have an abnormality in the structure of a gene called FLT3. Genes are pieces of DNA (molecules that carry instructions for development, functioning, growth and reproduction) inside each cell that tell the cell what to do and when to grow and divide. FLT3 plays an important role in the normal making of blood cells. This gene can have permanent changes that cause it to function abnormally by making cancer cells grow. Gilteritinib may block the abnormal function of the FLT3 gene that makes cancer cells grow. The overall goals of this study are, 1) to compare the effects, good and / or bad, of CPX-351 with daunorubicin and cytarabine on people with newly diagnosed AML to find out which is better, 2) to study the effects, good and / or bad, of adding gilteritinib to AML therapy for patients with high amounts of FLT3 / ITD or other FLT3 mutations and 3) to study changes in heart function during and after treatment for AML. Giving CPX-351 and / or gilteritinib with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to standard chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 111 locations

  • Daunorubicin and Cytarabine with or without Uproleselan in Treating Older Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Receiving Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    This phase II / III trial studies how well daunorubicin and cytarabine with or without uproleselan works in treating older adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia receiving intensive induction chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Uproleselan may prevent cancer from returning or getting worse. Giving daunorubicin and cytarabine with uproleselan may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to daunorubicin and cytarabine alone.
    Location: 170 locations

  • A Phase 2 Study of Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.
    Location: 39 locations

  • Study of Crenolanib vs Midostaurin Following Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidation Therapy in Newly Diagnosed FLT3 Mutated AML

    A phase III randomized multi-center study designed to compare the efficacy of crenolanib with that of midostaurin when administered following induction chemotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in newly diagnosed AML subjects with FLT3 mutation. About 510 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either crenolanib in addition to standard first line treatment of AML (chemotherapy and if eligible, transplantation) (arm A) or midostaurin and standard treatment (arm B). Potentially eligible subjects will be registered and tested for the presence of FLT3 mutation. Once the FLT3 mutation status is confirmed and additional eligibility is established, subject will be randomized and enter into the treatment phase.
    Location: 24 locations

  • A Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of JCAR017 to Standard of Care in Adult Subjects With High-risk, Transplant-eligible Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    The study will be conducted in compliance with the International Council for Harmonisation (ICH) of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use / Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and applicable regulatory requirements. This is a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center trial in adult subjects with Relapsed or refractory (R / R) aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) to compare safety and efficacy between the standard of care (SOC) strategy versus JCAR017 (also known as lisocabtagene maraleucel or liso-cel). Subjects will be randomized to either receive SOC (Arm A) or to receive JCAR017 (Arm B). All subjects randomized to Arm A will receive Standard of care (SOC) salvage therapy (R-DHAP, RICE or R-GDP) as per physician's choice before proceeding to High dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Subjects from Arm A may be allowed to cross over and receive JCAR017 upon confirmation of an EFS event. Subjects randomized to Arm B will receive Lymphodepleting (LD) chemotherapy followed by JCAR017 infusion.
    Location: 23 locations

  • Flotetuzumab for the Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of flotetuzumab and how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with flotetuzumab may induce changes in the body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of leukemia cells to grow and spread. Giving flotetuzumab may stop the leukemia from growing or shrink for a period of time, as well as possibly lessening symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the leukemia.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Pevonedistat, Azacitidine, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well pevonedistat, azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Bortezomib, Vorinostat, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with bortezomib and combination chemotherapy in treating infants (patients less than 1 year old) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, hydrocortisone, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with bortezomib and vorinostat may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Study to Determine the Efficacy of Uproleselan (GMI-1271) in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Relapsed / Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This study will evaluate the efficacy of uproleselan (GMI-1271), a specific E-selectin antagonist, in combination with chemotherapy to treat relapsed / refractory AML, compared to chemotherapy alone. The safety of uproleselan when given with chemotherapy will also be investigated in patients with relapsed / refractory AML
    Location: 19 locations

  • Study of Biomarker-Based Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This screening and multi-sub-study Phase 1b / 2 trial will establish a method for genomic screening followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-study "Master Protocol (BAML-16-001-M1)." The specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia will determine which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to evaluate investigational therapies or combinations with the ultimate goal of advancing new targeted therapies for approval. The study also includes a marker negative sub-study which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.
    Location: 17 locations

  • Tisagenlecleucel in Adult Patients With Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This is a randomized, open label, multicenter phase III trial comparing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of tisagenlecleucel to Standard Of Care in adult patients with aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma after failure of rituximab and anthracycline containing frontline immunochemotherapy.
    Location: 16 locations

  • Randomized Trial of Gilteritinib vs Midostaurin in FLT3 Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Eligible untreated patients with FLT3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) between the ages of 18 and 65 will be randomized to receive gilteritinib or midostaurin during induction and consolidation. Patients will also receive standard chemotherapy of daunorubicin and cytarabine during induction and high-dose cytarabine during consolidation. Gilteritinib, is an oral drug that works by stopping the leukemia cells from making the FLT3 protein. This may help stop the leukemia cells from growing faster and thus may help make chemotherapy more effective. Gilteritinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients who have relapsed or refractory AML with a FLT3 mutation but is not approved by the FDA for newly diagnosed FLT3 AML, and its use in this setting is considered investigational. Midostaurin is an oral drug that works by blocking several proteins on cancer cells, including FLT3 that can help leukemia cells grow. Blocking this pathway can cause death to the leukemic cells. Midostaurin is approved by the FDA for the treatment of FLT3 AML. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of gilteritinib to midostaurin in patients receiving standard combination chemotherapy for FLT3 AML.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Study Evaluating Efficacy and Safety of CPI-613 in Combination With HD Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone Compared to HD Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone and Control Sub-groups: MEC and FLAG in Older Patients With R / R AML

    A Phase III study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CPI-613® (devimistat) in combination with High Dose Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone in comparison with high dose Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone and control sub-groups: combination of Mitoxantrone, Etoposide and Cytarabine (MEC) and combination of Fludarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim (FLAG) in older patients with relapsed / refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia. CPI-613® (devimistat) targets the altered energy metabolism and processes for production of ATP and essential bio-intermediates unique to and characteristic of most cancer cell types. The addition of CPI-613® (devimistat) to high dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone (CHAM) will improve the complete remission (CR) rate in patients 50 years or older with relapsed or refractory AML when compared to HAM alone or other control sub groups.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Open-label Study of FT-2102 With or Without Azacitidine or Cytarabine in Patients With AML or MDS With an IDH1 Mutation

    This Phase 1 / 2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 (olutasidenib) activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 8 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (as a single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination) on various AML / MDS disease states.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Daratumumab in Pediatric and Young Adult Participants Greater Than or Equal to (>=)1 and Less Than or Equal to (<=) 30 Years of Age With Relapsed / Refractory Precursor B-cell or T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of daratumumab in addition to standard chemotherapy in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) / lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) and T-cell ALL / LL as measured by the complete response (CR) rate.
    Location: 16 locations

  • LCH-IV, International Collaborative Treatment Protocol for Children and Adolescents With Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    The LCH-IV is an international, multicenter, prospective clinical study for pediatric Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis LCH (age < 18 years).
    Location: 10 locations

  • An Efficacy Study Comparing Ponatinib Versus Imatinib, Administered in Combination With Reduced-Intensity Chemotherapy, in Participants With Newly Diagnosed Ph+ ALL

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of ponatinib versus imatinib, administered as first-line therapy in combination with reduced-intensity chemotherapy, in participants with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL, as measured by the minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative complete remission (CR) at the end of induction.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Onvansertib in Combination With Either Low-dose Cytarabine or Decitabine in Adult Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    The purpose of the phase 1b / 2 study is to determine whether Onvansertib given orally daily for 5 consecutive days every 28 days is safe and tolerable in adult patients who have relapsed / refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), or are ineligible for intensive induction therapy, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase 2 dose of Onvansertib in combination with decitabine or Onvansertib in combination with low-dose cytarabine. In the phase 2 portion of the study, Onvansertib in combination with decitabine will be studied to provide further data on the safety profile of the combination and to preliminarily assess the activity of the chosen combination in patients with untreated AML who are not candidates for aggressive induction therapy, or who have received one prior treatment for their AML.
    Location: 9 locations


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