Clinical Trials Using Cytarabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cytarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 116

  • Cytarabine, Idarubicin and Liposome-encapsulated Daunorubicin-Cytarabine, or Venetoclax, Azacitidine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or venetoclax, azacitidine and decitabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, idarubicin, liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving patients cytarabine, idarubicin, liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine, venetoclax, azacitidine or decitabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia based on clinicogenetic risk stratification.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Venetoclax with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of venetoclax and how well it works when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cytarabine, filgrastim and idarubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax together with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy, Ponatinib and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive and / or BCR-ABL Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and ponatinib work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and / or BCR-ABL positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia that may have come back or is not responding to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, dexamethasone, methotrexate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with rituximab and blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor helps the bone marrow make recover after treatment. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy, ponatinib, and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy with or without Total Body Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy, such as total body irradiation, uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Blinatumomab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma or Transformed Large Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well blinatumomab works after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or transformed large cell lymphoma. Blinatumomab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Umbilical Cord Blood NK Cells, Rituximab, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (umbilical cord blood natural killer [NK] cells), rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immune system cells, such as cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, are made by the body to attack foreign or cancerous cells. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, lenalidomide, melphalan, and rituximab, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A stem cell transplant using stem cells from the patient or a donor may be able to replace blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill cancer cells. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Higher or Lower Dose Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Medically Less Fit Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Neoplasm

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well higher or lower dose cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone work in treating medically less fit patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid neoplasm. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone at higher or lower dose may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Blinatumomab, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride with or without Selinexor in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride with or without selinexor work in treating older patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Selinexor may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride with selinexor may kill more cancer cells in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone with Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed, Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]), cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, when given together with sorafenib tosylate and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (likely to be more aggressive). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride together with sorafenib tosylate may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Nintedanib, Idarubicin Hydrochloride, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of nintedanib, idarubicin hydrochloride, and cytarabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Nintedanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as idarubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nintedanib, idarubicin hydrochloride, and cytarabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Biomarkers in Predicting Treatment Response to Sirolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Patients with High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies whether biomarkers (biological molecules) in bone marrow samples can predict treatment response to sirolimus and combination chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is likely to come back or spread (high-risk). Sirolimus inhibits or blocks the pathway that causes cancer cells to grow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adding sirolimus to combination chemotherapy may help improve patient response. Studying samples of bone marrow from patients treated with sirolimus in the laboratory may help doctors learn whether sirolimus reverses or turns off that pathway and whether changes in biomarker levels can predict how well patients will respond to treatment.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ixazomib Citrate, Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ixazomib citrate when given together with daunorubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine in treating older patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Ixazomib citrate blocks enzymes called proteasomes, which may help keep cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ixazomib citrate together with daunorubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine may be a better treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Dose Escalation of OXi4503 as Single Agent and Combination With Cytarabine w / Subsequent Ph 2 Cohorts for AML and MDS

    Phase 1 will investigate maximum tolerated dose of OXi4503 as a single agent and in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine in subjects with relapsed / refractory AML or MDS. Phase 2 will investigate overall response rate of OXi4503 in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine in 1) subjects with MDS after failure of 1 prior hypomethylating agent (Arm A) and 2) subjects with relapsed and refractory AML after treatment failure of up to 1 prior chemotherapy regimen (Arm B).
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • A Phase Ib / II Multicenter Open-label Study of BGB324 in Patients With AML or MDS

    A Phase Ib / II multicentre open label study of BGb324 as a single agent in patients with AML or MDS or in a combination with cytarabine and decitabine in AML patients. BGB324 is a potent selective small molecule inhibitor of Axl, a surface membrane protein kinase receptor which is overexpressed in up to half of AML cases.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. - Before transplant, participants will: - Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. - Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. - Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. - Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. - Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. - Participants will get the SCT. - After transplant, participants will: - Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. - Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. - Stay near D.C. for 3 months. - Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Clofarabine, Idarubicin, Cytarabine, Vincristine Sulfate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia that is newly diagnosed or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural kill cells and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment (refractory) or has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed). Giving natural killer cells after high dose chemotherapy may boost the patient's immune system by helping it see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and causing it to destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect).
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine work in treating patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Ponatinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride work in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called N-acetyl-gamma-calicheamicin dimethyl hydrazide (CalichDMH). Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, Filgrastim-sndz, Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, and Idarubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as gemtuzumab ozogamicin, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim-sndz, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Nelarabine in Treating Patients with T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and nelarabine work in treating patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, prednisone, pegaspargase, nelarabine, and venetoclax work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study of Gilteritinib (ASP2215) Combined With Chemotherapy in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) / Internal Tandem Duplication (ITD) Positive Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    The purpose of the phase 1 portion (dose escalation) of the study will be to establish an optimally safe and biologically active recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and / or to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for gilteritinib in sequential combination with fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG). The purpose of the phase 2 portion (dose expansion) is to determine complete remission (CR) rates and composite complete remission (CRc) rates after two cycles of therapy. The study will also assess safety, tolerability and toxicities of gilteritinib in combination with FLAG, evaluate FLT3 inhibition, assess pharmacokinetics (PK), perform serial measurements of minimal residual disease, obtain preliminary estimates of 1-year event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rate and assess the acceptability as well as palatability of the formulation. One cycle is defined as 28 days of treatment. A participant completing 2 cycles in phase 1 or 2 will have the option to participate in long term treatment (LTT) with gilteritinib (for up to 2 years).
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Best Available Therapy Versus Autologous Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Sclerosis (BEAT-MS)

    This is a multi-center prospective rater-masked (blinded) randomized controlled trial of 156 participants, comparing the treatment strategy of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) to the treatment strategy of Best Available Therapy (BAT) for treatment-resistant relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants will be randomized at a 1 to 1 (1:1) ratio. All participants will be followed for 72 months after randomization (Day 0, Visit 0).
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington