Clinical Trials Using Daratumumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Daratumumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 56

  • Daratumumab, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Immunotherapy with daratumumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab with dexamethasone and pomalidomide may work bettering in treating patient compared to dexamethasone and pomalidomide alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib and to see how well it works when given together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Pomalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib together with pomalidomide and dexamethasone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma That Is Not Refractory to Bortezomib

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ixazomib citrate works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement but is not resistant to bortezomib. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • FT538 in Subjects With Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    This is a Phase I dose-finding study of FT538 as monotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in combination with monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma (MM). The study will consist of a dose-escalation stage and an expansion stage where participants will be enrolled into indication-specific cohorts.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Daratumumab, Azacitidine, and Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Previously Treated with Daratumumab

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, azacitidine, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory) and was previously treated with daratumumab. Daratumumab is an antibody made up of immune cells that attaches to a protein on myeloma cells, called CD38. CD38 is found in higher levels on tumor cells than on normal cells. Daratumumab prevents the growth of tumors who have high levels of CD38 by causing those cells to die. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Dexamethasone is a steroid that helps decrease inflammation and lowers the body's normal immune response to help reduce the effect of any infusion-related reactions. Giving azacitidine may help increase the levels of CD38 on the tumor cells to increase the function of daratumumab to attach to those tumor cells to help destroy them.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Daratumumab-Based Therapy for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma with Kidney Failure

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab-based therapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma with kidney failure. Daratumumab-based therapy includes daratumumab, bortezomib, dexamethasone, and thalidomide or lenalidomide. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Bortezomib is a drug that prevents myeloma cells from getting rid of their waste products, leading to being targeted for death. Dexamethasone is a steroid that is commonly used, either alone or in combination with other drugs, to treat multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide and thalidomide may stop the growth of multiple myeloma by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, dexamethasone, and thalidomide or lenalidomide may be a good way to treat patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma with kidney failure.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Study of Ciforadenant in Combination With Daratumumab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This is a Phase 1b open-label study of ciforadenant, an oral, small molecule inhibitor targeting adenosine-2A receptors (A2AR), on safety / tolerability and efficacy in combination with daratumumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting CD38, in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Daratumumab and Ibrutinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, DIRECT Study

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab and ibrutinib work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody which works with the body’s immune system to destroy cancer cells. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared to ibrutinib alone.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Daratumumab and Dexamethasone with or without Lenalidomide or Bortezomib for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in Older Adults

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab and dexamethasone with or without lenalidomide or bortezomib works in treating older adults with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, lenalidomide, bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab and dexamethasone with lenalidomide or bortezomib may work better in treating older adults with multiple myeloma compared to daratumumab and dexamethasone.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Daratumumab, Bortezomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in Elderly Patients

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone works in treating newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in elderly patients. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bortezomib and lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone together may work better compared to bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone with or without Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone with or without bortezomib work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ixazomib, dexamethasone, and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone with or without bortezomib may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Daratumumab, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not response to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bortezomib and ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone may work better and help to control cancer in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Daratumumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma after Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) after stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Daratumumab and Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor lymphocyte infusions when given together with daratumumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) after a stem cell transplant. A donor lymphocyte infusion is a type of therapy in which lymphocytes (white blood cells) from the blood of a donor are given to a participant who has already received a stem cell transplant from the same donor. The donor lymphocytes may kill remaining cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving daratumumab and donor white blood cells may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low-dose Dexamethasone in Treating Participants with Newly-diagnosed, Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone work in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes need for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone may work better in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Study of Melphalan Flufenamide (Melflufen) + Dex With Bortezomib or Daratumumab in Patients With RRMM

    This is an open-label Phase 1 / 2a study which will enroll patients that have relapsed or relapsed-refractory multiple myeloma following 1-4 lines of prior therapy. Patients will receive either melflufen+dexamethasone+bortezomib or melflufen+dexamethasone+daratumumab and are required to be IMiD refractory to be enrolled to the bortezomib regimen, and to not have any prior exposure to daratumumab or other antiCD-38 mAb to be enrolled to the daratumumab regimen.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Daratumumab in Treating Transplant-Eligible Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab works in treating transplant-eligible patients with multiple myeloma. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Daratumumab in Treating Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies the side effects of daratumumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer or kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Daratumumab and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Symptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase Ib trials studies the side effects of daratumumab and ibrutinib and how well they work in treating patients with symptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Daratumumab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab after a stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may kill cancer cells that are left after chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refectory Amyloid Light Chain Amyloidosis

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone in treating patients with amyloid light chain amyloidosis that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ixazomib and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating participants with previously treated amyloid light chain amyloidosis.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Daratumumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia / Lymphoma, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or T acute lymphoblastic leukemia / lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-dose Dexamethasone or Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-dose Dexamethasone and Daratumumab in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Following Lenalidomide-based Therapy in the First or Second Line Setting

    This trial will evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination of pomalidomide (POM) and low-dose dexamethasone (LD-Dex) (Cohort A) or the combination of pomalidomide (POM) , daratumumab (DARA) and low-dose dexamethasone (LD-Dex) (Cohort B) in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received a first or second line treatment of lenalidomide-based therapy. This trial will test the hypothesis for Cohort A that the proportion of patients will have an Overall Response Rate (ORR) of > 30 % to reveal that Pomalidomide is efficacious in pretreated patients who are refractory to lenalidomide. This trial will test the hypothesis for Cohort B that the proportion of patients will have an Overall Response Rate (ORR) of > 70 % to reveal that POM+DARA+LD-Dex is efficacious in pretreated patients who are refractory to lenalidomide. This trial will test the hypothesis for Cohort C that the proportion of patients will have an Overall Response Rate (ORR) of >60% to reveal that POM+DARA+LD-Dex is efficacious in pretreated patients who are refractory to lenalidomide. This treatment will be in only Japanese patients.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of Daratumumab and Dose-Adjusted EPOCH in Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies how well daratumumab in combination with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage I-IV plasmablastic lymphoma. Plasmablastic lymphoma cells have high levels of a protein called CD38. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically targets CD38 expressing cells, and may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab may enhance the effectiveness of a standard chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH) in patients with plasmablastic lymphoma.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of Lenalidomide / Ixazomib / Dexamethasone / Daratumumab in Transplant-Ineligible Patients With Newly Diagnosed MM

    A randomized Phase II clinical trial will be conducted to assess the impact on progression free survival (PFS) with the addition of ixazomib and daratumumab to lenalidomide as a maintenance treatment following induction with lenalidomide, ixazomib, dexamethasone, and daratumumab. Patients will be randomized to either: Arm A: 12 cycles of lenalidomide, ixazomib, daratumumab, and dexamethasone followed by lenalidomide until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity or a maximum of 2 years of maintenance therapy. Arm B: 12 cycles of lenalidomide, ixazomib, daratumumab and dexamethasone, followed by lenalidomide, ixazomib, and daratumumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity or a maximum of 2 years maintenance therapy.
    Location: 3 locations