Clinical Trials Using Dasatinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Dasatinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-22 of 22
  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1189 locations

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Dasatinib or Nilotinib in Treating Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate and dasatinib or nilotinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Ruxolitinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 449 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Dasatinib, Imatinib Mesylate, or Nilotinib in Treating Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Persistently Detectable Minimal Residual Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, or nilotinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and persistent detection of minimal residual disease, defined as the levels of a gene product called bcr-abl in the blood. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, and nilotinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, or nilotinib may work better in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 199 locations

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy or dasatinib, prednisone, and blinatumomab work in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, vincristine sulfate, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab with combination chemotherapy or dasatinib and prednisone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 152 locations

  • Risk Classification Schemes in Identifying Better Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies risk classification schemes in identifying better treatment options for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factor classification may help identify how strong treatment should be for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 7 locations

  • TAPUR: Testing the Use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved Drugs That Target a Specific Abnormality in a Tumor Gene in People With Advanced Stage Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to learn from the real world practice of prescribing targeted therapies to patients with advanced cancer whose tumor harbors a genomic variant known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug. NOTE: Due to character limits, the arms section does NOT include all TAPUR Study relevant biomarkers. For additional information, contact TAPUR@asco.org, or if a patient, your nearest participating TAPUR site (see participating centers).
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Phase I Study of Oral ABL001 in Patients With CML or Ph+ ALL

    The design of a phase I, open label, dose finding study was chosen in order to establish a safe and tolerated dose of single agent ABL001 in CML and Ph+ ALL patients who are relapsed or refractory to or are intolerant of TKIs, and of ABL001+Nilotinib, ABL001+Imatinib and ABL001+Dasatinib in Ph positive CML patients who are relapsed or refractory to TKIs.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pediatric Precision Laboratory Advanced Neuroblastoma Therapy

    A prospective open label, multicenter study to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of using molecularly guided therapy in combination with standard therapy followed by a Randomized Controlled Trial of standard immunotherapy with or without DFMO followed by DFMO maintenance for Subjects with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • ABL001, Dasatinib, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with BCR-ABL Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ABL001 when given together with dasatinib and prednisone in treating patients with BCR-ABL positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia. ABL001 and dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Prednisone may help to lessen inflammation and lower the body's immune response. Giving ABL001, dasatinib, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with BCR-ABL positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Dasatinib and Everolimus in Treating Children with Newly Diagnosed, Recurrent, or Progressive High-Grade Glioma with PDGFR Alterations

    This phase II trial studies how well dasatinib and everolimus work in treating children with high-grade glioma with PDGFR alterations that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or is growing, spreading or getting worse. Dasatinib and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Ganitumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Embryonal or Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with ganitumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with ganitumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dasatinib and ganitumab may work better in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Clinical Trial of BP1001 (Liposomal Grb2 Antisense Oligonucleotide) in Combination With Dasatinib in Patients With Ph + CML Who Have Failed TKI, Ph+ AML, Ph+ MDS

    The primary objective of the Phase Ib study is to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of BP1001 in combination with dasatinib in patients with with Philadelphia Chromosome Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) including chronic phase patients who have failed initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy, accelerated or blast phase, Ph+ Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or High-risk Ph+ Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS). The primary objective of the Phase IIa study is to assess the efficacy of the combination of BP1001 and dasatinib in patients with Ph+ CML, Ph+AML, or high-risk Ph+ MDS.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Personalized Kinase Inhibitor Therapy Combined with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase IB trial studies the feasibility of using a functional laboratory based study to determine how well the test can be used to select personalized kinase inhibitor therapy in combination with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It also evaluates safety and potential efficacy. Kinase inhibitor is a type of substance that blocks an enzyme called a kinase. Human cells have many different kinase enzymes, and they help control important cell functions. Certain kinases are more active in some types of cancer cells and blocking them may help keep the cancer cells from growing. Testing samples of blood from patients with AML and ALL in the laboratory with kinase inhibitors may help determine which kinase inhibitor has more activity against cancer cells and which one should be combined with standard of care chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a personalized kinase inhibitor therapy combined with standard chemotherapy may be a better treatment for AML and ALL.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Dasatinib and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome Positive or BCR-ABL1 Positive Early Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well dasatinib and venetoclax work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive or BCR-ABL1 positive early chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Dasatinib and venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dasatinib, Temsirolimus, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Advanced, Recurrent, or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib and temsirolimus when given together with cyclophosphamide in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body, have come back, or have not respond to previous treatment. Dasatinib and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving dasatinib and temsirolimus together with cyclophosphamide may be a better treatment for advanced solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Palbociclib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Pediatric Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies how well palbociclib and combination chemotherapy work in treating pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Palbociclib and dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, bortezomib, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving palbociclib and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 192 locations

  • Dasatinib in Treating Patients with nEGFR Positive Stage I-III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well dasatinib works in treating patients with nuclear (n)EGFR stage I-III triple-negative breast cancer. nEGFR promotes tumor growth. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin