Clinical Trials Using Degarelix

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Degarelix. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-15 of 15
  • Standard Systemic Therapy with or without Definitive Treatment in Treating Participants with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase III trial studies whether the addition of definitive treatment (radiation or surgical removal) of the primary tumor to standard systemic therapy for patients with prostate cancer, may help prevent the cancer from the spreading to other parts of their body. Removing the prostate by either surgery or radiation therapy in addition to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.
    Location: 248 locations

  • Antiandrogen Therapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 236 locations

  • A Study of Androgen Annihilation in High-Risk Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    This is a randomized, open-label, three-arm, phase 3 study in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer and PSA doubling time ≤ 9 months at the time of study entry.
    Location: 26 locations

  • Nivolumab, Docetaxel, and Androgen Deprivation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic, Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer with DNA Damage Repair Defects or Inflamed Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, docetaxel, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) work in treating patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage repair defects or inflamed tumors that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Testosterone can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. ADT, or hormonal therapy, may help fight prostate cancer by cutting off the supply of testosterone. Nivolumab is an antibody (a type of human protein) that works by stimulating the body’s immune system to recognize and fight cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy may make cancer cells more recognizable to the immune system, and make cancer cells more susceptible to nivolumab immunotherapy. The purpose of this study is to examine the activity and safety of hormonal therapy combined with docetaxel chemotherapy and nivolumab immunotherapy for patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Nivolumab and Degarelix with or without BMS-986253 in Treating Patients with Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and how well nivolumab and degarelix with or without BMS-986253 work in treating patients with prostate cancer that is sensitive to hormone therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and BMS-986253, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Testosterone can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as degarelix, may lessen the amount of testosterone made by the body. It is not yet known whether giving nivolumab and degarelix with or without BMS-986253 will work better in treating patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Docetaxel and Degarelix in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well docetaxel and degarelix work in treating patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Androgen can cause the growth of tumor cells. Hormone therapy using degarelix may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and / or blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Giving docetaxel and degarelix may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Conventional Androgen Deprivation Therapy with or without Abiraterone, Prednisone, and Apalutamide for the Treatment of High Risk Prostate Cancer after Radiation and Male Hormone Deprivation Therapy

    This phase III trial studies conventional male hormone (androgen) deprivation therapy (also called hormonal therapy), abiraterone acetate (abiraterone), prednisone, and apalutamide to see how well this combination works compared with conventional androgen deprivation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer who have already received radiation therapy and who are receiving long-term hormonal therapy for their prostate cancer and whose prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains detectable despite having received at least 6 months of hormonal therapy. Androgen deprivation therapy blocks the function of male hormones, including testosterone which prostate cancer cells use to grow and spread. Adding abiraterone, prednisone, and apalutamide to the conventional androgen deprivation therapy may work better than conventional androgen deprivation therapy alone in treating patients with detectable PSA who have received radiation therapy and are being treated with long-term hormonal therapy for their prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Androgen Deprivation Therapy (Leuprolide and Degarelix) and Chemoimmunotherapy (Cemiplimab and Docetaxel) for the Treatment of Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (leuprolide and degarelix) and chemoimmunotherapy (cemiplimab and docetaxel) and to see how well they work in treating patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using leuprolide and degarelix may fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cemiplimab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to determine if the addition of immunotherapy to chemotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy, is safe and improves response to therapy.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride, Hormone Therapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase 2 trial studies radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Radium Ra 223 dichloride contains a radioactive substance that collects in the bone and gives off radiation that may kill cancer cells. Hormone therapy using leuprolide acetate or goserelin acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation may work better at treating prostate cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Degarelix, Bicalutamide, and Docetaxel before Surgery in Treating Patients with High Risk Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies how well degarelix, bicalutamide, and docetaxel before surgery works in treating patients with high risk prostate. Hormone therapy using degarelix and bicalutamide, may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving degarelix, bicalutamide, and docetaxel before surgery may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • High-Dose Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well high-dose brachytherapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body. Brachytherapy is a type of radiation therapy in which radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters is placed directly into or near a tumor and may be a better treatment in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Two Studies for Patients with High Risk Prostate Cancer Testing Less Intense Treatment for Patients with a Low Gene Risk Score and Testing a More Intense Treatment for Patients with a High Gene Risk Score, The PREDICT-RT Trial

    This phase III trial compares less intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer and low gene risk score. This trial also compares more intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in patients with high risk prostate cancer and high gene risk score. Abiraterone acetate may help fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone made by the body. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a shorter hormone therapy treatment may work the same at controlling prostate cancer compared to the usual 24 month hormone therapy treatment in patients with low gene risk score. Adding abiraterone acetate and apalutamide to the usual treatment may increase the length of time without prostate cancer spreading as compared to the usual treatment in patients with high gene risk score.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of Darolutamide to Hormonal Therapy (Androgen Deprivation Therapy [ADT]) after Surgery for Men with High-Risk Prostate Cancer, The ERADICATE Study

    This phase III trial compares the effect of adding darolutamide to ADT versus ADT alone after surgery for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. ADT reduces testosterone levels in the blood. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays a role in prostate cancer development. Darolutamide blocks the actions of the androgens (e.g. testosterone) in the tumor cells and in the body. Giving darolutamide with ADT may work better in eliminating or reducing the size of the cancer and / or prevent it from returning compared to ADT alone in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • CASPAR, A Clinical Study Evaluating The Benefit of Adding Rucaparib to Enzalutamide for Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer That Has Become Resistant To Testosterone-Deprivation Therapy

    This phase III trial compares the addition of rucaparib to enzalutamide with enzalutamide alone for the treatment of men with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and has become resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays role in prostate cancer development. Enzalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells for growth. PARPs are proteins that help repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as rucaparib, can keep PARPs from working , so tumor cells can't repair themselves. This may stop tumor cells from growing. Giving enzalutamide and rucaparib may prolong patients’ survival and / or prevent their cancer from growing or spreading for a longer time. It may also help doctors learn if a mutation in any of the specific DNA repair (homologous recombination) genes is helpful in selecting the most appropriate treatment for the patient.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Palifermin with Leuprolide Acetate or Degarelix after Total-Body Irradiation Based Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix works after total body-irradiation based donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies (cancer of the blood or bone marrow). Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving palifermin and leuprolide acetate or degarelix and removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether giving palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix is more effective in helping the immune system recover faster after a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York