Clinical Trials Using Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Doxorubicin Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 57

  • Parsaclisib plus the Standard Drug Therapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed, High Risk Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of parsaclisib plus the standard drug therapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone [R-CHOP]) and to see how well they work compared with R-CHOP alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed, high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Parsaclisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and vincristine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. It is not yet known if giving parsaclisib and R-CHOP together works better than R-CHOP alone in treating patients with high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Eribulin Mesylate Followed by Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with HER2-Negative Inflammatory Breast Cancer before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well eribulin mesylate works in combination with doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative inflammatory breast cancer before surgery. Eribulin mesylate works by interfering with cancer cell division, growth, and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving eribulin mesylate together with doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide before surgery may be an effective treatment in HER2-negative inflammatory breast cancer patients.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Mature B-Cell Lymphoma or Leukemia

    Many children and young adults with mature B-cell lymphoma can be cured with current standard treatments, but these standard treatments do not stop every child’s cancer from coming back. Furthermore, many children have significant side effects from treatment, both at the time of treatment and for many years after treatment is completed (late effects). That is why there is still much to be learned about this disease and its treatment. This study is being done to help researchers learn more about the biology and genetics of this disease in children in the United States (U.S.) and at several international sites and to study the effects (good and bad) of this treatment in St. Jude participants in order to help researchers guide treatment for children and young adults with this disease in the future.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pevonedistat with Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat and how well it works with combination chemotherapy in treating adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, dexamethasone, pegaspargase, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pevonedistat with chemotherapy may work better in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Adult T-Cell Leukemia / Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody that also has a chemotherapy drug attached to it. Antibodies are proteins that are part of the immune system. They can stick to and attack specific targets on cancer cells. The antibody part of brentuximab vedotin sticks to a target called CD30 that is located on the outside of the cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, etoposide phosphate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy together may work better in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known if carfilzomib in combination with rituximab and combination chemotherapy is better or worse than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Polatuzumab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Previously Untreated Double or Triple Hit Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well polatuzumab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with previously untreated double or triple hit lymphoma. Polatuzumab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody that works by binding with cancer cells and releasing another chemotherapy drug, called monomethyl auristatin E, into the cell causing the cancer cells to die or stop growing. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving polatuzumab vedotin with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with double or triple hit lymphoma compared to combination chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan

  • A Study of Daratumumab and Dose-Adjusted EPOCH in Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies how well daratumumab in combination with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage I-IV plasmablastic lymphoma. Plasmablastic lymphoma cells have high levels of a protein called CD38. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically targets CD38 expressing cells, and may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab may enhance the effectiveness of a standard chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH) in patients with plasmablastic lymphoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Aspirin, Tamoxifen, and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of ER Positive, HER2 Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates the side effects of aspirin, tamoxifen, and standard of care combination chemotherapy, and assesses how well they work before surgery for the treatment of patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive, HER2 negative stage I-III breast cancer. Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and blood clotting. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Tamoxifen may help fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving aspirin, tamoxifen, and combination chemotherapy may help to remove some, if not all, tumor cells prior to undergoing surgery.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin together with AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as AGEN1884 and AGEN2034, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma compared to doxorubicin alone.
    Location: University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

  • Acalabrutinib With DA-EPOCH-R or R-CHOP for People With Untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Most people with this cancer can be cured. But those who are not cured have a poor prognosis. Researchers want to add another drug to standard treatment see if it can improve the cure rate. Objective: To see if the drug acalabrutinib given with rituximab and standard combination chemotherapy can improve the cure rate of aggressive B-cell lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with an aggressive B-cell lymphomas that have not been treated Design: Participants will be screened with: Blood and urine tests Physical exam Medical history Tumor biopsy Bone marrow biopsy: A needle will remove marrow from the participant s hipbone. Lumbar puncture: If necessary, a needle will remove fluid from the participant s spinal canal. Imaging scans Participants will take the study drug for up to 14 days. It is a pill taken 2 times a day. Then they will have more scans. They will get rituximab and chemotherapy. They may get these drugs through a needle in an arm vein. Or they may them through a tube placed in a vein in their chest or in their neck. They might also keep taking the study drug. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. They will have up to 6 cycles. Participants may have 4 doses of another drug injected into their spinal fluid. Participants will have repeats of the screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment, then every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months for 3 years, and then yearly. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab and Combination Chemotherapy (R-CHOP) for the Treatment of Non-germinal Center Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma or High-Grade B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy (R-CHOP) work in treating patients with non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma or high-grade B cell lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma or high-grade B cell lymphoma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) vs Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) as Bridge to Transplant

    This study will compare stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) as a bridging strategy for patients with HCC undergoing liver transplantation. We propose that SBRT will be associated with longer time intervals between initial treatment and the need for retreatment, compared to TACE, as a "bridge" to liver transplantation in subjects with HCC.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Combination Chemotherapy and TAK-659 as Front-Line Treatment in Treating Patients with High-Risk Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate a new investigational drug, TAK-659, given in combination with standard chemotherapy, for the treatment of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). “Investigational” means that TAK-659 has not been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a prescription or over-the-counter medication to treat a certain condition. The primary purpose of this study is to find the appropriate and safe dose of the study drug to be used in combination with standard chemotherapy for the treatment of your disease and to determine how well the drug works in treating your disease. Other objectives include measuring the amount of the study drug in your body at different times after taking the study drug. Your participation in the study is expected to last for up to 3 years after receiving the last dose of the study drug. You will receive the study treatment for up to 18 weeks, as long as you are benefitting.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Ixazomib, Gemcitabine, and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ixazomib, gemcitabine, and doxorubicin work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body (locally advanced or metastatic). Ixazomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ixazomib, gemcitabine, and doxorubicin may work better in treating patients with kidney cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ruxolitinib in Combination with Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Adolescents and Young Adults with Ph-Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of ruxolitinib in combination with standard chemotherapy in treating adolescents and young adults with Philadelphia (Ph)-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ruxolitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with h-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Tailored Prednisone Reduction in Preventing Hyperglycemia in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Receiving Combination Chemotherapy Treatment

    This phase II trial studies how well tailored prednisone reduction works in preventing high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving combination chemotherapy treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Reductions in prednisone dose may lower blood sugar levels.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Pembrolizumab, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine in Treating Patients with Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of doxorubicin hydrochloride, pembrolizumab, vinblastine, and dacarbazine in treating patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride, pembrolizumab, vinblastine, and dacarbazine may work better in treating classical Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Selinexor and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor and how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or newly diagnosed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Selinexor may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving selinexor and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Blinatumomab, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment and cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Chemoprotective drugs, such as dexrazoxane hydrochloride, may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Durvalumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab when given together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage I-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 / neu protein. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • MRI-Guided Laser Heat Ablation in Treating Younger Patients with Brain Tumors

    This pilot phase II trial studies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser heat ablation in treating younger patients with brain tumors. MRI-guided laser ablation (MLA) is a minimally invasive laser surgery that uses a small incision in the scalp and skull, through which a thin laser probe is inserted and guided by MR imaging to the core of a tumor mass where it delivers hyperthermic ablation. MLA may disrupt the blood brain barrier, a separation of circulating blood from the fluid of the nervous system, which may improve delivery of the chemotherapy drugs to the brain.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Dose Adjusted EPOCH Regimen in Combination with Ofatumumab or Rituximab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well a dose adjusted regimen consisting of etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (EPOCH) works in combination with ofatumumab or rituximab in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed), or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas