Clinical Trials Using Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Doxorubicin Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-57 of 57

  • Treatment for Advanced B-Cell Lymphoma

    To safely reduce the burden of therapy in children, adolescents and young adults with mature B-NHL by reducing the number of intrathecal (IT) injections by the introduction of IT Liposomal Cytarabine (L-ARA-C, [Depocyt®]) and reducing the dose of anthracycline (doxorubicin) in good risk patients with the addition of rituximab to the FAB chemotherapy backbone (Immunochemotherapy).
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    This clinical trial studies combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated intraocular retinoblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, topotecan hydrochloride, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. In this trial, the first two cycles of chemotherapy will be given directly to the eye, and followed by additional chemotherapy. Giving the first two cycles of chemotherapy directly into the eye may improve the tumor's response to treatment.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Nelarabine in Treating Patients with T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and nelarabine work in treating patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, prednisone, pegaspargase, nelarabine, and venetoclax work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemo-Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase III trial compares the effects of nivolumab with chemo-immunotherapy versus chemo-immunotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Treatment for PMBCL involves chemotherapy combined with an immunotherapy called rituximab. Chemotherapy drugs work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab with chemo-immunotherapy may help treat patients with PMBCL.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 142 locations

  • Microdevice for In Situ Candidate Drug Screening in Skin Lesions of T-Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot trial studies the side effects and feasibility of microdevice for in situ candidate drug screening in skin lesions of T-cell lymphoma. Implanting and retrieving a microdevice that releases up to 19 drugs directly within a skin lesion may be a possible tool to evaluate the effectiveness of several approved cancer drugs against cutaneous T cell lymphoma or peripheral T cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Implantable Microdevice for the Delivery of Drugs and their Effect on Tumors in Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Sarcoma

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of implanting and removing a microdevice in patients with sarcomas that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or have come back (recurrent). Microdevices are rice-sized devices that are implanted into tumor tissue and are loaded with 10 different drugs that are delivered at very small doses, or "microdoses," which may only affect a very small, local area inside the tumor. The purpose of this study is to determine which drugs delivered in the microdevice affect tumor tissue in patients with sarcomas.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas