Clinical Trials Using Duvelisib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Duvelisib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Duvelisib and Romidepsin or Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of duvelisib when given together with romidepsin or bortezomib in treating patients with T-cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Duvelisib, romidepsin, and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 10 locations

  • FORRDuvelisib and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Richter's Syndrome or Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with duvelisib and to see how well they work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment, or Richter's syndrome. Duvelisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Venetoclax targets a protein called BCL-2, which helps cancer cells survive. Combining duvelisib and venetoclax may be able to prevent tumor from growing.
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Study of Duvelisib in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma (PTCL)

    This is a multi-center, parallel cohort, open-label, Phase 2 study of duvelisib, an oral dual inhibitor of PI3K-δ,γ, in patients with relapsed or refractory Peripheral T cell Lymphoma (PTCL).
    Location: 10 locations

  • Intermittent Duvelisib Dosing in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well duvelisib on an intermittent (irregular) dosing schedule works in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Duvelisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving duvelisib on an intermittent schedule may result in similar effectiveness with less amount of severe side effects.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Duvelisib Maintenance after Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of T-Cell or Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well duvelisib works as maintenance therapy after autologous stem cell transplant works in treating patients with T-cell or indolent B-cell lymphomas. Maintenance therapy refers to treatment that is given to help keep cancer from coming back after it has disappeared following the initial therapy. Duvelisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Treatment with duvelisib may help keep lymphoma in remission after transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Phase 2 Study Comparing 2 Intermittent Dosing Schedules of Duvelisib in Subjects With Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. (TEMPO)

    This study will examine the effects of predefined 2 week duvelisib dose holidays on tumor responses and safety / tolerability.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Duvelisib and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Richter Syndrome or Transformed Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of duvelisib when given together with nivolumab in treating patients with Richter syndrome or transformed follicular lymphoma. Duvelisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving duvelisib and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with Richter syndrome or transformed follicular lymphoma compared to giving duvelisib or nivolumab alone.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Duvelisib and Nivolumab for the Treatment of Stage IIB-IVB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose, possible benefits, and / or side effects of duvelisib in combination with nivolumab in treating patients with stage IIB-IVB mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. Duvelisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving duvelisib in combination with nivolumab may work better than giving each of these drugs individually, or treating with the usual approach in patients with mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Doxorubicin, CC-(486) (5-azacitidine), Romidepsin, and Duvelisib (hARD) for T-cell Lymphoma

    Background: T-cell lymphomas (TCLs) are rare cancers. Many types of TCLs do not develop in the lymph nodes but in places like the skin, spleen, and bone marrow. Researchers want to see if a mix of 4 drugs can help people with TCL. Objective: To test if the combination of romidepsin, CC-486 (5-azacitidine), duvelisib, and doxorubicin can be used safely in people with TCL. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older with TCL that is newly diagnosed or that returned after or did not respond to standard treatments. Design: Participants will be screened on a separate protocol. They may have a tumor biopsy. Participants will have medical histories, medicine reviews, and physical exams. Their ability to do daily activities will be assessed. They will have blood and urine tests. Participants will take duvelisib and CC-486 (5-azacitidine) by mouth. They will get romidepsin and doxorubicin by intravenous infusion. They will take the drugs for up to eight 21-day cycles. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will have a bone marrow aspiration and / or biopsy. Bone marrow will be taken through a needle inserted in the hip. Participants will have tumor imaging scans. Some may have a brain MRI and lumbar puncture. Some may have skin assessments. Participants will give blood, saliva, and tumor samples for research. Participants will have a safety visit 30 days after treatment ends. Then they will have follow-up visits every 60 days for 6 months, then every 90 days for 2 years, and then every 6 months for 2 years. Then they will have yearly visits until their disease gets worse or they start a new treatment....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Acalabrutinib and Duvelisib for the Treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of acalabrutinib and duvelisib and how well they work in treating patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Acalabrutinib inhibits a signaling molecule called Bruton tyrosine kinase and blocks cancer cell proliferation, growth, and survival. Duvelisib is designed to block a protein called PI3 kinase in order to stop cancer growth and cause changes in the immune system that may allow the immune system to better act against cancer cells. Giving acalabrutinib and duvelisib together may work better to block cancer growth than therapy of either drug alone.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Testing the Addition of Duvelisib or CC-486 to the Usual Treatment for Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of adding duvelisib or CC-486 to the usual chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, etoposide, and prednisone vs. chemotherapy alone in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Duvelisib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the signals that cause cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop the spread of cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as CC-486, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Prednisone is used to reduce inflammation and lower the body's immune response to help reduce the side effects of chemotherapy drugs. This trial will help to determine whether adding duvelisib or CC-486 to the usual chemotherapy is better than chemotherapy alone in treating peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • A Study of Duvelisib in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Head and Neck Cancer

    This study will assess the safety and preliminary efficacy of duvelisib in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with recurrent or metastatic (R / M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Microdevice for In Situ Candidate Drug Screening in Skin Lesions of T-Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot trial studies the side effects and feasibility of microdevice for in situ candidate drug screening in skin lesions of T-cell lymphoma. Implanting and retrieving a microdevice that releases up to 19 drugs directly within a skin lesion may be a possible tool to evaluate the effectiveness of several approved cancer drugs against cutaneous T cell lymphoma or peripheral T cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations