Clinical Trials Using Elotuzumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Elotuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-11 of 11
  • Efficacy and Safety Study of bb2121 Versus Standard Regimens in Subjects With Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM)

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase 3 study comparing the efficacy and safety of bb2121 versus standard regimens in subjects with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). The study is anticipated to randomize approximately 381 subjects with RRMM. Approximately 254 subjects will be randomized to Treatment Arm A and approximately 127 subjects will be randomized to Treatment Arm B.
    Location: 29 locations

  • Selinexor and Backbone Treatments of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    This study will independently assess the efficacy and safety of 8 combination therapies in 9 arms, in dose-escalation / -evaluation and expansion phases, for the treatment of patients with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM). The combinations to be evaluated are: - Arm 1: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide (SPd) - Arm 2: Selinexor + dexamethasone + bortezomib (SVd); enrollment complete - Arm 3: Selinexor + dexamethasone + lenalidomide (SRd) in RRMM; enrollment complete - Arm 4: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide + bortezomib (SPVd) - Arm 5: Selinexor + dexamethasone + daratumumab (SDd); enrollment complete - Arm 6: Selinexor + dexamethasone + carfilzomib (SKd) - Arm 7: Selinexor + dexamethasone + lenalidomide (SRd) in NDMM - Arm 8: Selinexor + dexamethasone + ixazomib (SNd) - Arm 9: Selinexor + dexamethasone + pomalidomide + elotuzumab (SPEd) Selinexor pharmacokinetics: - PK Run-in (Days 1-14): Starting in protocol version 8.0, patients enrolled to any arm in the Dose Escalation Phase (i.e., Arm 4 SPVd, Arm 6 SKd, Arm 8 SNd, Arm 9 SPEd) will also first be enrolled to a pharmacokinetics (PK) Run-in period until 9 patients have been enrolled to this period to evaluate the PK of selinexor before and after co-administration with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Elotuzumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed Primary Amyloidosis

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and elotuzumab work in treating patients with primary amyloidosis that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with elotuzumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and elotuzumab may work better in treating patients with primary amyloidosis.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed of Refractory Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Second Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) who are undergoing a second stem cell transplant. Elotuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immuno-Oncology Drugs Elotuzumab, Anti-LAG-3 and Anti-TIGIT

    This a Phase I / II randomized trial for patients with relapsed refractory Multiple Myeloma who have relapsed after treatment with prior therapies. The protocol is designed to evaluate two agents, Anti-LAG-3 and Anti-TIGIT, in order to understand their immunologic effects and safety both as single agents and in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone. In these arms, patients will be treated with either Anti-LAG-3 or Anti-TIGIT respectively for one cycle as single agent followed by the addition of pomalidomide and dexamethasone in combination for subsequent cycles. A third arm allows patients to be treated with the FDA approved combination of elotuzumab plus pomalidomide and dexamethsone as a control. This arm will thus allow a concurrent standard of care comparator for the experimental arms.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Dexamethasone, Elotuzumab, and Pomalidomide in Treating Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well dexamethasone, elotuzumab, pomalidomide work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Pomalidomide may stop the growth of multiple myeloma by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Giving dexamethasone, elotuzumab, pomalidomide may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Elotuzumab and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab and lenalidomide works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or is growing, spreading, or getting worse. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab and lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with recurrent or progressive multiple myeloma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Donor Nicotinamide Expanded-Natural Killer Cells Followed by IL-2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or CD20 Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of donor nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 in treating patients with multiple myeloma or CD20 positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells may improve the natural killer cell cancer killing ability and improve their ability to home into the tumor cells. Interleukins such as IL-2, are proteins made by white blood cells and other cells in the body and may help regulate immune response. Giving nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Natural Killer Cells, Elotuzumab, Lenalidomide, and High Dose Melphalan, followed by Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of umbilical cord blood-derived natural killer cells when given together with elotuzumab, lenalidomide, and high dose melphalan before autologous stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and melphalan, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving natural killer cells from donor umbilical cord blood before transplant may also kill myeloma cells that remain in the body after the last chemotherapy treatment. After treatment, stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Elotuzumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low Dose Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low dose dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Elotuzumab and Lenalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab works when given with lenalidomide as maintenance therapy after transplant in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who underwent transplant using their own stem cells (autologous transplant). Maintenance therapy is treatment that is given to help keep cancer from coming back after it has disappeared following the initial treatment. Elotuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Adding elotuzumab to standard maintenance therapy with lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma who have undergone transplant.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov