Clinical Trials Using Enasidenib Mesylate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Enasidenib Mesylate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • Myeloma-Developing Regimens Using Genomics (MyDRUG)

    The MyDRUG study is a type of Precision Medicine trial to treat patients with drugs targeted to affect specific genes that are mutated as part of the disease. Mutations in genes can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer. Patients with a greater than 30% mutation to any of the following genes; CDKN2C, FGFR3, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF V600E, IDH2 or T(11;14) can be enrolled to one of the treatment arms. These arms have treatments specifically directed to the mutated genes. Patients that do not have a greater than 30% mutation to the genes listed can be enrolled to a non-actionable treatment arm. The genetic sequencing of the patient's tumor is required via enrollment to the MMRF002 study: Clinical-grade Molecular Profiling of Patients with Multiple Myeloma and Related Plasma Cell Malignancies. (NCT02884102).
    Location: 6 locations

  • CPX-351 plus Enasidenib for Relapsed AML

    This trial evaluates how well CPX-351 and enasidenib work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by IHD2 mutation. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving CPX-351 and enasidenib may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Enasidenib as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia with IDH2 Mutation after Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of enasidenib as maintenance therapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia with IDH2 mutation following donor stem cell transplant. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Enasidenib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and IDH2 Gene Mutation

    This phase II trial studies how well enasidenib and azacitidine work in treating patients with IDH2 gene mutation and acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Enasidenib and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas