Clinical Trials Using Enzalutamide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Enzalutamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-47 of 47

  • Testosterone Therapy Followed by Enzalutamide or Abiraterone Acetate in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Is Progressing on Combined Androgen Therapies

    This phase II trial studies how well testosterone therapy followed by enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has become worse or spread on combined androgen therapies. Androgens, such as testosterone, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen therapies, such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, suppress or block the production or action of testosterone. Rapid treatment with testosterone may make the cancer cells become sensitive to retreatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate. Giving testosterone prior to enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate may have an effect on the growth of prostate cancer in men who have not responded to long term therapy to lower testosterone in their blood (castrating therapy).
    Location: 2 locations

  • ZEN-3694, Enzalutamide, and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates how well ZEN-3694, enzalutamide, and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). ZEN-3694 blocks the expression of the MYC gene to prevent cellular growth in certain types of tumors, including castrate resistant prostate cancer. Enzalutamide has been shown to block testosterone from reaching prostate cancer cells by binding to a receptor on prostate cancer cells, called androgen receptors. This works similar to a lock and key. When enzalutamide (key) inserts into the androgen receptor (lock) testosterone cannot attach to the androgen receptor, which slows the growth of tumor cells and may cause them to shrink. Pembrolizumab is a monoclonal antibody (proteins that can protect the body from foreign organisms, such as bacteria and viruses) designed to block a specific control switch which may be activated by tumor cells to overcome the body’s natural immune system defenses. It also enhances the activity of the body’s immune cells against tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to find out the effects ZEN-3694, enzalutamide, and pembrolizumab on patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have previously experienced disease progression.
    Location: University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

  • Erdafitinib and Abiraterone Acetate or Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Double Negative Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well erdafitinib in combination with abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide works in treating patients with double negative prostate cancer. Erdafitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as abiraterone acetate, may lessen the amount of testosterone made by the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as enzalutamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving erdafitinib with abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer compared to abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide alone.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Transdermal Testosterone and Enzalutamide in Treating Patents with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    This early phase I trial studies how well testosterone works when delivered through the skin and is used alternately with enzalutamide in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who are receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Hormone therapy using testosterone may help to maintain the amount of testosterone in the body, and enzalutamide may help to reduce the prostate specific antigen level. Giving transdermal testosterone alternately with enzalutamide may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of KPG-121 Plus Enzalutamide, Abiraterone or Apalutamide in CRPC Patients

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, multicenter study of KPG-121 administered orally once daily (QD) in 28-day treatment cycles (21 days on and 7 days off) to adult subjects. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and assess dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of KPG-121 in combination with Enzalutamide or Abiraterone or Apalutamide when administered orally to adult subjects with non-metastatic or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Combining CRLX101, a Nanoparticle Camptothecin, With Enzalutamide in People With Progressive Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Following Prior Enzalutamide Treatment

    Background: Some prostate cancer keeps growing even when testosterone in the body drops to very low levels. This is called castrate-resistant prostate cancer. One treatment is enzalutamide. This is a modern hormonal therapy. But it only works for a certain amount of time and then the cancer becomes resistant to it. Researchers want to see if adding the treatment CRLX101 could make enzalutamide work again for people who have already had it. Objective: To test a new way of treating prostate cancer using CRLX101 plus enzalutamide in people with certain prostate cancer who already had enzalutamide treatment. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 years and older with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who have had enzalutamide treatment Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have a scan of the chest / abdomen / pelvis. They will have a bone scan. Participants will get treatment in cycles. A cycle lasts 28 days. They will take enzalutamide by mouth once a day. They will get CRLX101 through an IV every 1 or 2 weeks. Participants will repeat screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have a follow-up visit 3-4 weeks after they stop taking the study drug. They will repeat most screening tests and have an electrocardiogram.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • LHRH analog, Abiraterone, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Stage IV Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies how well LHRH analog, abiraterone, and prednisone work in treating patients with stage IV castration sensitive prostate cancer. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as LHRH analog and abiraterone, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving LHRH analog, abiraterone, and prednisone may help treat patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • IONIS-AR-2.5Rx and Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of IONIS-AR-2.5Rx when given together with enzalutamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as IONIS-AR-2.5Rx and enzalutamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Alpelisib and Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Androgen Receptor and PTEN Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alpelisib when given together with enzalutamide in treating patients with androgen receptor and PTEN positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Alpelisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Androgens can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Enzalutamide blocks the use of androgens by the tumor cells. Giving alpelisib and enzalutamide may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Enzalutamide and Niclosamide in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of niclosamide when given together with enzalutamide in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using enzalutamide may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and / or blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Niclosamide may block signals that enhance prostate cancer cell growth. Giving enzalutamide and niclosamide may work better in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Enzalutamide and Indomethacin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of enzalutamide and indomethacin and to see how well they work in treating patients with prostate cancer that does not respond to treatment with hormones despite surgical removal of testes (castration-resistant), has come back (recurrent), or has spread from where it started to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug that has been found to block one of the signals that enhance prostate cancer cell growth. Hormone therapy using enzalutamide and indomethacin may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and / or blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Enzalutamide and Paclitaxel before Surgery in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Androgen Receptor-Positive Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase IIB trial studies how well enzalutamide and paclitaxel before surgery works in treating patients with stage I-III androgen receptor-positive triple-negative breast cancer. Androgens can cause the growth of triple-negative breast cancer. Anti-hormone therapy, such as enzalutamide, prevent androgen from binding to the androgen receptor, thereby decreasing cell growth and causing tumor cell death. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving enzalutamide and paclitaxel before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. This treatment study is part of the MD Anderson Moonshot initiative.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Safety and Efficacy of Therapies for Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC)

    This is a master protocol designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of investigational therapies in participants with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • HC-1119 Versus Enzalutamide in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC)

    This study is a multinational Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority, efficacy and safety study of oral HC-1119 (80 mg / day) versus enzalutamide (160 mg / day) in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The following assessment of prostate cancer status will be collected during the course of the trial: soft tissue disease on computed tomography (CT) scan or on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bone disease on radionuclide bone scans, FACT-P and EQ-5D, Brief Fatigue Inventory, and PSA. Throughout the study, safety and tolerability will be assessed by the recording of adverse events, monitoring of vital signs and physical examinations, safety laboratory evaluations, and 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs). Blood samples for population pharmacokinetics for HC-1119 and enzalutamide and related metabolites will be collected.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Continuation Protocol for ZEN003694 in Patients Experiencing Clinical Benefit While Enrolled in a ZEN003694 Protocol

    Continuation Protocol for ZEN003694 in Patients Experiencing Clinical Benefit While Enrolled in a ZEN003694 Protocol
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Enzalutamide and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine and how well it works when given together with enzalutamide in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as enzalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Decitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving decitabine and enzalutamide may work better in treating participants with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Enzalutamide with Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with enzalutamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as enzalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Venetoclax may target a special group of prostate cancer cells that is known to lead to resistance to treatment. Giving enzalutamide and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Enzalutamide and Relacorilant in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of enzalutamide and relacorilant in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs, such as enzalutamide and relacorilant, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. It is not yet known whether enzalutamide and relacorilant may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Cognitive Assessment and MRI Program in Identifying Cognitive Effects of Androgen Receptor Directed Therapies in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This clinical trial studies how well cognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) program work in identifying cognitive effects of androgen receptor directed therapies such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide in patients with prostate cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body. Cognitive assessment and MRI program may help to assess the cognitive function of patients during treatment and identify genetic variations that might make patients more or less sensitive to cognitive changes during treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Combined With Enzalutamide and Abiraterone Using Multiparametric MRI and 18FDCFPyL PET / CT in Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is a common cancer among men. There are several ways to treat it, including hormone blocking drugs, radiation therapy, and surgery. Researchers want to combine abiraterone and enzalutamide to see if there is a better way to treat prostate cancer. They also want to study a new radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL, with the help of a scan called positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) to see if there is a better way to detect prostate cancer. Objective: To develop improved techniques to localize and detect prostate cancer; and to develop new ways to treat prostate cancer Eligibility: Men ages 18 and older with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body Design: - Participants will have a medical evaluation to determine eligibility for the study. - Participants will take three different medications daily by mouth and receive two injections during the course of the study. - Participants will have a medical evaluation monthly (for 6 months) while taking the medications. - Participants will have prostate MRI and PET / CT scans before treatment, 2 months after starting treatment and again before surgery. The radiotracer will be given by injection about 2 hours before the whole-body scan. The PET / CT scan itself is about an hour. - Participants may be asked to do a biopsy before treatment and 2 months after starting treatment. - Participants will have a full medical evaluation before surgery to remove their prostate. - Participants will have a follow-up visit 3 months after surgery and then as needed. - Participants will be contacted once a year for their PSA and testosterone levels for 5 years...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Androgen Receptor Directed Therapy on Cognitive Function in Patients Treated With Darolutamide or Enzalutamide

    This is a prospective, randomized, open-label phase II study comparing cognitive outcomes between men with non-metastatic and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC or M0CRPC) treated with darolutamide or enzalutamide. Approximately 132 patients will be enrolled. Eligible patients will be randomized in a 1:1 fashion to treatment with enzalutamide 160 mg orally daily or darolutamide 600 mg orally twice daily, in combination with standard LHRH agonist based treatment. Cognitive assessments will be performed using modules from Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) an internationally recognized software for assessing cognitive function and impairment.
    Location: 2 locations