Clinical Trials Using Exemestane

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Exemestane. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-18 of 18
  • Randomized, Open Label, Clinical Study of the Targeted Therapy, Palbociclib, to Treat Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate that the combination of palbociclib with anti-HER2 therapy plus endocrine therapy is superior to anti-HER2-based therapy plus endocrine therapy alone in improving the outcomes of subjects with hormone receptor-positive, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 24 locations

  • Fulvestrant or Exemestane with or without Ribociclib in Patients with Recurrent, Unresectable, or Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized, phase II trial studies how well fulvestrant or exemestane with or without ribociclib works in treating patients with hormone receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative breast cancer that has progressed after treatment with an aromatase inhibitor or cyclin-dependent kinase 4 / 6 inhibitor (recurrent), cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Hormone therapy using fulvestrant or exemestane may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells or reducing the amount of estrogen made by the body. Ribociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving fulvestrant or exemestane with ribociclib may be an effective treatment for patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Radiation Therapy, Palbociclib, and Hormone Therapy in Treating Breast Cancer Patients with Bone Metastasis

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy given with standard care palbociclib and hormone therapy work in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread from one part of the body to the bone. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Antihormone therapy, such as fulvestrant, letrozole, anastrozole, exemestane, or tamoxifen, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving radiation therapy, palbociclib, and hormone therapy may work better in treating breast cancer patients with bone metastasis.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Phase 3 Trial of Elacestrant vs. Standard of Care for the Treatment of Patients With ER+ / HER2- Advanced Breast Cancer

    This Phase 3 clinical study compares the efficacy and safety of elacestrant to the standard of care (SoC) options of fulvestrant or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) in women and men with breast cancer whose disease has advanced on at least one endocrine therapy including a CDK4 / 6 inhibitor in combination with fulvestrant or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) .
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Study of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Hormone Receptor (HR)-Positive Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Negative Breast Cancer

    This study is designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of several immunotherapy-based combination treatments in participants with locally advanced or metastatic HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer who have progressed during or following treatment with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 / 6 inhibitor in the first- or second-line setting, such as palbociclib, ribociclib, or abemaciclib. The study will be performed in two stages. During Stage 1, participants will be randomized to fulvestrant (control) or an atezolizumab-containing doublet or triplet combination. Those who experience disease progression, loss of clinical benefit, or unacceptable toxicity may be eligible to receive a new triplet combination treatment in Stage 2 until loss of clinical benefit or unacceptable toxicity. New treatment arms may be added and / or existing treatment arms may be closed during the course of the study on the basis of ongoing clinical efficacy and safety as well as the current treatments available.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Anti-estrogen Therapy in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative or Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and doxorubicin hydrochloride works compared to pembrolizumab with anti-estrogen therapy (anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestane) in treating patients with triple-negative or hormone-receptor positive breast cancer that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body. Pembrolizumab is an antibody drug that blocks a molecule called programmed cell death (PD)-1. PD-1 is a molecule that that shuts down the body's immune responses and prevents the immune system from attacking the cancer. Doxorubicin hydrochloride is a drug used in chemotherapy that works to stop the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing and by causing them to die. Anti-estrogen therapy, including anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, lowers estrogen levels in the body, which may help treat cancer that is hormone receptor-positive. Giving pembrolizumab together with standard treatment of either doxorubicin hydrochloride (triple-negative cancer) or anti-estrogen therapy (hormone receptor-positive cancer) may be an effective treatment for these types of breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Palbociclib, Everolimus, and Exemestane in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib / IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib and everolimus and how well they work when given together with exemestane in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Palbociclib, everolimus, and exemestane may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of LY2835219 (Abemaciclib) in Combination With Therapies for Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    This study evaluates the safety of abemaciclib in combination therapies (letrozole, anastrozole, tamoxifen, exemestane, exemestane plus everolimus, trastuzumab, LY3023414 plus fulvestrant, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab with loperamide) for breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Exemestane in Treating Patients with Complex Atypical Hyperplasia of the Endometrium / Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia or Low Grade Endometrial Cancer

    This pilot phase IIa trial studies how well exemestane works in treating patients with complex atypical hyperplasia of the endometrium / endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia or low grade endometrial cancer. Exemestane may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ipatasertib with Aromatase Inhibitor, Fulvestrant, and / or Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipatasertib when given together with aromatase inhibitor (letrozole, anastrozole, or exemestane), fulvestrant, and palbociclib in treating patients with hormone receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or to other places in the body (metastatic). Stopping (inhibiting) an enzyme called Akt in tumor cells may stop cancer resistance to standard of care treatment. Ipatasertib is a type of inhibitor that may stop the growth of tumor cells by inhibiting Akt. Through the different combinations of ipatasertib and the standard of care drugs, the chance of cancer cells becoming resistant to the standard of care drugs may decrease, causing cancer cells to stop growing and spreading.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Durvalumab and Aromatase Inhibitor before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients with Hormone-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and anastrozole (or other aromatase inhibitors) work when given before surgery in treating postmenopausal patients with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as durvalumab may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Aromatase inhibitors, such as anastrozole, are hormonal blockers that are used in standard of care treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. This study may help find out how well durvalumab and anastrozole work when given before surgery in treating postmenopausal patients with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • The XENERA™-1 Study Tests Xentuzumab in Combination With Everolimus and Exemestane in Post-menopausal Women With Hormone Receptor Positive and HER2-negative Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    The main objective of the trial is to assess the anti-tumor activity of xentuzumab in combination with everolimus and exemestane over everolimus and exemestane in post menopausal patients with HR+ / HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer and non-visceral disease.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • MCLA-128 With Trastuzumab / Chemotherapy in HER2+ and With Endocrine Therapy in ER+ and Low HER2 Breast Cancer

    A Phase 2, open-label, multicenter international study will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of MCLA-128-based combinations. Three combination treatments will be evaluated, two in Cohort 1 and one in Cohort 2. MCLA-128 is given in combinations in two metastatic breast cancer (MBC) populations, HER2-positive / amplified (Cohort 1) and Estrogen Receptor-positive / low HER2 expression (Cohort2). Two combinations treatments will be evaluated in Cohort 1, the doublet and triplet. Initially MCLA-128 is given in combination with trastuzumab in the doublet. After the safety of the doublet has been assessed in 4-6 patients, MCLA-128 is given in combination with trastuzumab and vinorelbine in the triplet, in parallel to the efficacy expansion of the doublet. The doublet and triplet combinations are both evaluated in two steps with an initial safety run-in followed by a cohort efficacy expansion. In total up to 40 patients evaluable for efficacy are included in both the doublet and triplet. In Cohort 2 MCLA-128 is administered in combination with the same previous endocrine therapy on which progressive disease is radiologically documented. A total of up to 40 patients evaluable for efficacy are included in the Cohort 2.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Exemestane in Treating Post-menopausal Patients with Recurrent or Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well exemestane works in treating post-menopausal patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has come back (recurrent) or that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Exemestane blocks an enzyme that helps create estrogen. It has been used in treating breast cancer and may also be effective in treating advanced lung cancer while causing fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Endocrine Therapy in Treating Patients with HER2 Negative, Low Risk Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase IV trial studies how well endocrine therapy works in treating patients with HER2 negative, low risk breast cancer. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Endocrine therapies such as aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec with Paclitaxel or Endocrine Therapy in Treating Participants with Metastatic, Unresectable, or Recurrent HER2- Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib trials studies the side effects and how well talimogene laherparepvec works when given together with paclitaxel or endocrine therapy in treating participants with breast cancer that does not express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein and has spread to other places in the body, cannot be removed by surgery, or has come back after. Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Drugs used as endocrine therapy, such as letrozole, anastrozole, exemestane, tamoxifen or fulvestrant, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body or may may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking estrogen from connecting to the cancer cells. Giving talimogene laherparepvec with paclitaxel or endocrine therapy may work better in treating participants with HER2-negative breast cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Alternative Dosing of Exemestane before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients with Stage 0-II Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase IIb trial studies how well alternative dosing of exemestane before surgery works in treating in postmenopausal patients with stage 0-II estrogen positive breast cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep breast cancer from forming or coming back. The use of exemestane may treat early stage (stage 0-II) breast cancer. Comparing the exemestane standard dose regimen versus two alternative, less frequent dose regimens may decrease undesirable symptoms and have similar efficacy in reducing serum estradiol.
    Location: 3 locations