Clinical Trials Using Filgrastim-primed Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Filgrastim-primed Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-3 of 3
  • Giving Chemotherapy and rATG for a Shortened Amount of Time before a Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of giving chemotherapy and a drug called rATG for a shortened amount of time before a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancers. A chemotherapy regimen with the drugs busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine kill cancer cells in the body, making room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow and reducing the chance of transplanted cell rejection. The chemotherapy drugs work to interrupt the DNA (genetic information) in the cancer cells, stopping the cells from dividing and causing them to die. rATG targets and deactivates white blood cells called T cells that survive the chemotherapy. T cells may see the donor’s cells as foreign, causing a serious condition called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). rATG helps prevent the donor stem cells from being rejected. Giving chemotherapy and rATG for a shortened amount of time before a donor stem cell transplant may help reduce the number of side effects and shorten hospitalization following the transplantation.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Nonmyeloablative Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Congenital Anemias including Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemia

    This phase II trial studies the safety and efficacy of a nonmyeloablative (bone marrow will not be completely destroyed) donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with congenital (condition or trait present at birth) anemias including sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Giving low doses of total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of abnormal cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining abnormal cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving immunosuppressive therapies, such as alemtuzumab and sirolimus, before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee