Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 136

  • Safety and Efficacy of Axicabtagene Ciloleucel in Combination With Either Rituximab or Lenalidomide in Participants With Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma (ZUMA-14)

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the efficacy of axicabtagene ciloleucel in combination with either rituximab or lenalidomide, as measured by assessment of response rates in adult participants with relapsed / refractory large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Optimizing PTCy Dose and Timing

    Background: Stem cell or bone marrow transplants can cure or control blood cancers. Sometimes the donor cells see the recipient s body as foreign. This can cause complications. A high dose of the drug cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can help reduce these risks. Researchers want to see if a lower dose of PTCy can have the same benefits. Objective: To see if a lower dose of PTCy will help people with blood cancers have a more successful transplant and fewer side effects. Eligibility: People ages 15-65 with leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that is not curable with standard therapy and is at high risk of returning without transplant, and their healthy adult relatives Design: Transplant participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, breathing, and heart tests Scans Chest x-ray Bone marrow samples: A needle inserted into the participant s pelvis will remove marrow and a bone fragment. Transplant recipients will stay at the hospital and be prepped with chemotherapy over 6 days for the transplant. They will get stem cells through a catheter in the chest or neck. They will get the cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. They will stay in the hospital about 4 more weeks. They will have blood transfusions. They will have frequent blood tests and 2 bone marrow samples within 1 year after the transplant. Donor participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest x-ray Scans Donor participants will have bone marrow taken from their pelvis or stem cells taken from their blood. For the blood donation, blood will be taken from a vein in one arm, move through a machine to remove white blood cells, and be returned through a vein in the other arm. Participation will last up to 5 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • T-cells Expressing an Anti-SLAMF7 CAR for Treating Multiple Myeloma

    Background: Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that is usually incurable. T cells are part of the immune system. Researchers think changing a person s T cells to recognize their cancer could help the person s body kill tumor cells. This is a new approach that uses a patient s own cells to target multiple myeloma. Objective: To see if giving anti-SLAM7 CAR T cells with a stop switch to people with multiple myeloma is safe andto see if adding a gene to stop T-cell activity can limit toxicity of this therapy. Eligibility: People ages 18-73 with multiple myeloma for which prior standard treatment has not worked Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Bone marrow samples: A needle inserted into the participant s bone will remove marrow. - Imaging scans: Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. Participants will have apheresis. They will receive a catheter or central line: A plastic tube will be inserted into a chest or arm vein. Blood will be removed and the T cells separated. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant. The T cells will be manipulated in the lab. Participants will get chemotherapy through the central line for 3 days. Participants will receive the manipulated T cells through the central line. They will stay in the hospital at least 9 days. Participants will have follow-up visits 2 weeks then 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after the infusion. They will then have visits every 6 months for 3 years. Then they will be contacted once per year for 15 years. All visits will include blood tests, and 3 visits will include bone marrow biopsies....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Cell Therapy (Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes) for the Treatment of Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Solid Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well cell therapy (with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) works for the treatment of solid cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), or has come back (recurrent). This trial involves taking cells called lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the therapy is called cell therapy. Giving chemotherapy drugs before the cells may temporarily suppress the immune system to improve the chances that the tumor fighting cells will be able to survive in the body. Giving aldesleukin after the cell administration may help the tumor fighting cells stay alive longer. Giving tumor fighting cells (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) followed by aldesleukin may cause the cancer to shrink.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Modified Immune Cells (LN-145) and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer Who Have Failed Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well modified immune cells (LN-145) and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with transitional cell cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other places in the body and have failed cisplatin-based chemotherapy. LN-145 is made up of specialized immune cells called lymphocytes or T cells that are taken from a patient's tumor and infused back into the patient to attack the tumor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving LN-145 may help control transitional cell bladder cancer when given together with pembrolizumab.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Valproic Acid Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells in Treating Adult Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the effects of valproic acid expanded umbilical cord blood stem cells in treating adult patients with hematological malignancies undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Expanding or growing umbilical cord blood stem cells in a laboratory using valproic acid may lead to faster white blood cell count recovery, lower the risk of infections, and improve transplant results compared to umbilical cord blood stem cells that have not been expanded.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • PSCA-CAR T Cells in Treating Patients with PSCA+ Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of PSCA-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells in treating patients with prostate stem cell antigen positive (PSCA+) castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. PSCA-CAR T cells are immune cells that have been engineered in the laboratory to kill tumor cells. This is done by using a virus to insert a piece of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into the immune cells that allows them to recognize prostate tumor cells. It is not yet known how well PSCA-CAR T cells works in killing tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Stem Cell Transplant with Chemotherapy and Selected Use of Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well transplanting blood cells with chemotherapy work in treating patients with a high risk blood cancer that is in remission. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells and cancer cells. It may also help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving filgrastim may stop this from happening. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving stem cells with chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with blood cancer.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • CART123 Cells in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of chimeric antigen receptor T-123 (CART123) cells in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back after previous treatment (relapsed). This research study takes some of the patient's white blood cells (T-cells) through a process called apheresis, and modifies them so that they can identify and possibly kill the cancerous cells. The modification is a genetic change, or gene transfer, to the normal T-cells. These modified cells are called CART123 cells and after they are modified they are given back to the patient through the vein. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy may help CART123 cells grow and survive in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Safety and Efficacy of Repeat Administration of Ad / PNP and Fludarabine Phosphate in Patients With Local Head / Neck Cancer

    Primary Objective: The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the safety of repeat administration of a dose level of Ad / PNP plus fludarabine phosphate (F-araAMP) which demonstrated anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced, locoregional head / neck cancer in a completed phase I study. Secondary Objective: The secondary objective is to evaluate the antitumor activity of repeat administration of Ad / PNP plus F-araAMP.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Modified Immune Cells (Autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells) for Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified immune cells (autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells) for treating patients with high risk neuroblastoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or ganglioneuroblastoma. Antibodies and T cells are two different ways the body fights disease. When T cells have part of an antibody attached to them they are better at recognizing and killing tumor cells. The treatment that is being research on this trial, autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells, combines T cells and antibodies in order to create a more effective treatment. An antibody called anti-GD2 joins to T cells in the blood and can detect and stick to neuroblastoma cells because they have a substance on the outside of them called GD2. The IL-15 gene, which cells use to communicate with one another, is added so that the T cells can attack tumor cells more effectively. The iC9 gene is added as an "off-switch" so that it can stop the T cells from working if serious side effects are experienced. This study is being done to see if giving autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells is safe, tolerable, and helpful in treating neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Donor T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies donor T cell depletion in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Donor stem cell transplants, especially in the mismatched donor setting, are associated with increased risk for GVHD, a condition where the transplanted donor white blood cells attack your body’s normal tissues. Using a cell separation device may remove a subset of white blood cells (called alpha / beta T cells) from the donor product before the product is transplanted. This study is being done to assess whether this manipulation (called selective T cell depletion) will reduce the risk of GVHD and improve transplant outcome.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • TCR-engineered T Cells in Solid Tumors

    The study purpose is to establish the safety and tolerability of IMA203 product in patients with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Autologous CAR138 T-cells in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous chimeric antigen receptor targeting CD138 antigen (CAR138) T cells in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. CAR138 T cells combines antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are proteins that protect the body from disease caused by bacteria or toxic substances and by stopping them from growing. T cells are special infection fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cancer cells or cells that are infected.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Autologous Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes MDA-TIL in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes MDA-TIL works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes MDA-TIL, made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) from a patient's tumor, may help to stimulate the immune system in different ways to stop tumor cells from growing.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • T Cells Expressing a Novel Fully-Human Anti-BCMA CAR for Treating Multiple Myeloma

    Background: Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the blood plasma cells. It usually becomes resistant to standard treatments. Researchers have developed a procedure called gene therapy. It uses a person s own T cells, which are part of the immune system. The cells are changed in a lab and then returned to the person. Researchers hope the changed T cells will be better at recognizing and killing tumor cells. Objective: To test the safety of giving changed T cells to people with multiple myeloma. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-73 who have been diagnosed with multiple myeloma that has not been controlled with standard therapies. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood tests Heart function tests Bone marrow sample taken by needle in a hip bone Scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. They may have a brain scan. Pregnancy test Participants will have apheresis. Blood will be removed through an arm vein. The blood will be separated and T cells removed. The rest of the blood will be returned through a vein in the other arm. Participants will have a central line placed in a large vein in the arm or chest. Participants will get 2 chemotherapy drugs by the central line over 3 days. Two days later, participants will get the changed T cells by the central line. They will stay in the hospital at least 9 days. Participants must stay near the hospital for 2 weeks. Participants will have 8 follow-up visits over the next year for blood and urine tests. They may have scans. Participants blood will be collected regularly over the next several years. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4 with or without ATLCAR.CD30 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma or Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies best dose and how well autologous CCR4-CD30CAR-CD28-CD3zeta-expressing T-Lymphocytes (ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4) with or without autologous CD30CAR-CD28-CD3zeta-expressing T-Lymphocytes (ATLCAR.CD30) works in treating patients with CD30+ Hodgkin lymphoma or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that has come back or that does not respond to treatment. T cells or T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with bacteria or viruses. Modified T-cells called autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor cells targeted against the CD30 antigen (ATLCAR.CD30) and autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor cells targeted against the CD30 antigen with CCR4 (ATLCAR.CD30.CCR4) may help the cells move to regions in the body where the cancer is present and may improve the body's ability to fight Hodgkin lymphoma or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • MOv19-BBz CAR T Cells with or without Cyclophosphamide and Fludarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent High Grade Serous Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MOv19-BBz CAR T cells and how well they work with or without cyclophosphamide and fludarabine in treating patients with high grade serous ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back (recurrent). MOv19-BBz CAR T cells are a type of T cell (white blood cell) that are modified by introducing a receptor (chimeric antigen receptor [CAR]) that recognizes the folate receptor alpha protein so that they can identify and possibly kill cancer cells expressing folate receptor alpha. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cyclophosphamide and fludarabine before MOv19-BBz CAR T cells may help them grow and survive in the body.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Alpha / Beta T Cell Depleted Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Fanconi Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well alpha / beta T cell depleted stem cell transplant works in treating patients with Fanconi Anemia. Fanconi anemia is an inherited disorder that causes the bone marrow to stop making enough new blood cells (bone marrow failure) or to make abnormal cells (myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia) and the only proven cure is a stem cell transplant. A common risk with a stem cell transplant is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) which occurs when the donor cells (the graft) see the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack it. A method to decrease the risk of GVHD, is to remove most of the lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells, from the donor cell product. There has been a new machine developed which better selects the types of white blood cells to remove from the donor. This type of processing is called T cell receptor (TCR) alpha / beta T cell depletion. The purpose of this study is to learn if removing the donor T cells from the donor product using this new method will be a better way to reduce the risk of GVHD. The benefit of removing these cells with this new method is that they will prevent GVHD without requiring drugs to suppress the immune system. Potentially, the immune system will recover from the transplant faster, which in turn will also lessen the risk of severe infections.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • SJCAR19 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with CD19 Positive Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells SJCAR19 (SJCAR19) and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating younger patients with CD19 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). SJCAR19 is an experimental therapy that takes peripheral (circulating) blood cells, and engineers them to make them more effectively kill cancer cells. SJCAR19 is created in the lab by genetically modifying T cells in such a way that allows the T cells to recognize cancer cells and attack them like an antibody would. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving SJCAR19 with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Total Body Irradiation before TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes Donor Transplant in Treating Participants with High-Risk Myeloid Diseases

    This phase I trial studies how well reduced intensity chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes donor transplant) works in treating participants with high-risk myeloid diseases. Giving chemotherapy such as anti-thymocyte globulin and fludarabine phosphate, as well as total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the participant's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects and how well tumor infiltrating lymphocytes with chemotherapy work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. Specific cells, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes developed from the immune cells found within a patients tumor masses may help to target tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving tumor infiltrating lymphocyte and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Radiation, before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Participants with Blood Disorders and Blood Cancers

    This phase III trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total body radiation before donor stem cell transplant work in treating participants with blood disorders and blood cancers. Giving chemotherapy such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate and total body radiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow. When the healthy cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. The donated cells may also replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • LN-145 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • AntiCD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase 1 trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous anti-CD19 CAR-CD3zeta-4-1BB-expressing T-cells (antiCD9 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells) when given together with chemotherapy in treating participants with CD19 positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or that does not respond to treatment. Therapy with antiCD9 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells works by removing T cells from the blood and modifying them to be able to target cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading, and may work to suppress the immune system and allow antiCD9 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells to work better. Giving antiCD9 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells and chemotherapy may work better in treating participants with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations