Clinical Trials Using Fluorouracil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fluorouracil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 126-135 of 135
< Previous 1 ... 4 5 6

  • Genetic Analysis-Guided Irinotecan Hydrochloride Dosing of gFOLFIRINOX in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal or Stomach Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies genetic analysis-guided irinotecan hydrochloride dosing of genotype-directed fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (gFOLFIRINOX) with or without trastuzumab in treating patients with gastroesophageal or stomach cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin may also help fluorouracil work better. Trastuzumab binds to human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) on the surface of HER2-positive cancer cells, and may kill tumor cells. Genetic analysis may help doctors determine what dose of irinotecan hydrochloride patients can tolerate.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy before and after Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy before and after surgery works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Glufosfamide Versus 5-FU in Second Line Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    The study is designed to assess whether glufosfamide provides additional survival benefit as compared to bolus 5-FU in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who have already progressed or failed therapy on a gemcitabine based first line regimen.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Docetaxel, Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil work in treating patients with previously untreated stage II-IV nasal cavity and / or paranasal sinus cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Phase 3 Study of MRTX849 With Cetuximab vs Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer With KRAS G12C Mutation (KRYSTAL-10)

    Study 849-010 is an open-label, randomized Phase 3 clinical trial comparing the efficacy of MRTX849 administered in combination with cetuximab versus chemotherapy in the second-line treatment setting in patients with CRC with KRAS G12C mutation.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Anticancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy with FOLFIRI in Advanced or Metastatic Cancers of the Stomach and Intestines

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects of BAY 1895344 in combination with FOLFIRI in treating patients with stomach or intestinal cancer that is unlikely to be cured or controlled with treatment or has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as irinotecan, fluorouracil, and leucovorin, (called FOLFIRI in short) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BAY 1895344 in combination with FOLFIRI may help shrink advanced or metastatic stomach and / or intestinal cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients with Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best way to give pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery and to see how well it works in treating adult patients with gastroesophageal junction or gastric cardia cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue (locally advanced) and can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving pembrolizumab, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients with HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.
    Location: 31 locations

  • Dasatinib in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Receiving FOLFOX Regimen and Bevacizumab

    This phase Ib trial studies side effects and best dose of dasatinib in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who are receiving FOLFOX regimen and bevacizumab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX regimen), work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. However, the buildup of oxaliplatin in the cranial nerves can result in damage or the nerves. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Blocking these enzymes may reduce oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Individualized Response Assessment to Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) for the Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis From Ovarian, Colorectal, Appendiceal, or Peritoneal Mesothelioma Histologies

    Background: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) removes tumors in the abdomen. HIPEC is heated chemotherapy that washes the abdomen. CRS and HIPEC may help people with peritoneal carcinomatosis. These are tumors that have spread to the lining of the abdomen from other cancers. Researchers think they can improve results of CRS and HIPEC by choosing the chemotherapy drugs used in HIPEC. Objective: To see if HIPEC after CRS can be improved, by testing different chemotherapy drugs, using a model called the SMART (Sample Microenvironment of Resected Metastatic Tumor) System. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have peritoneal carcinomatosis that cannot be fully removed safely with surgery. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Computed tomography (CAT) scan Other imaging scans, as needed Electrocardiogram (EKG) Tumor biopsy, if needed Laparoscopy. Small cuts will be made in the abdomen. A tube with a light and a camera will be used to see their organs. Some screening tests will be repeated in the study. Participants will enroll in NIH protocol #13C0176. This allows their tumor samples to be used in future research. Participants will have CRS. As many of their visible tumors will be removed as possible. They will also have HIPEC. Two thin tubes will be put in their abdomen. They will get chemotherapy through one tube. It will be drained out through the other tube. They will be in the hospital for 7-21 days after surgery. Participants will give tumor, blood, and fluid samples for research. They will complete surveys about their health and quality of life. Participants will have follow-up visits over 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland


< Previous 1 ... 4 5 6