Clinical Trials Using Gemcitabine Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Gemcitabine Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 89

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and nivolumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Nivolumab with Carboplatin or Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride and nivolumab with carboplatin or oxaliplatin work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether gemcitabine hydrochloride and nivolumab with carboplatin or oxaliplatin may work better in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy before Surgery Followed by Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy before surgery followed by combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and stereotactic body radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed, and giving paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and gemcitabine hydrochloride after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Nab-Paclitaxel before Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Bile Duct Cancer in the Liver

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and nab-paclitaxel work before surgery in treating patients with high-risk bile duct cancer in the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, cisplatin, and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-small Lung Cancer Previously Treated with PD-1 or PD-L1 Inhibitor

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with stage IV non-small lung cancer previously treated with PD-1 or PD-L1 Inhibitor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, docetaxel, or pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and pembrolizumab may work better in controlling cancer and treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride with or without Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects of carboplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride with or without pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to the other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab together with carboplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to the other places in the body.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Study of Olaparib Plus Pembrolizumab Versus Chemotherapy Plus Pembrolizumab After Induction With First-Line Chemotherapy Plus Pembrolizumab in Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) (MK-7339-009 / KEYLYNK-009)

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of olaparib (MK-7339) plus pembrolizumab (MK-3475) with chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab after induction with first-line chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). The primary hypotheses are: 1. Olaparib plus pembrolizumab prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab. 2. Olaparib plus pembrolizumab is non-inferior to chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab in terms of overall survival (OS). 3. Olaparib plus pembrolizumab prolongs OS compared with chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Paricalcitol, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Nab-Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well paricalcitol, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Paricalcitol is a form of vitamin D that works by blocking a signal in the cancer tumor cells that leads to growth and spreading of the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving paricalcitol, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • ADI-PEG 20, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pegargiminase (ADI-PEG 20) works in combination with gemcitabine hydrochloride and docetaxel in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, or small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed surgically (unresectable) or that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). ADI-PEG 20 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ADI-PEG 20 with gemcitabine hydrochloride and docetaxel may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Phase 1 Dose-escalation Study of FF-10832 for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    To determine the safety profile, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) in patients who receive FF-10832 (Gemcitabine Liposome Injection) for treatment of advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Phase 2 Study of siG12D LODER in Combination With Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    In this Phase II study a dose of 2.8 mg (eight 0.35 mg siG12D-LODERs) will be administered in 12-week cycles to patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer combined with chemotherapy treatment. Primary Outcome: - Progression-free survival (PFS) in the study population.
    Location: 4 locations

  • GB1275 Monotherapy and in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Specified Advanced Solid Tumors or in Combination With Standard of Care in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This first-in-human (FIH ) study is an open-label, multicenter study that consists of a Phase 1 Dose Escalation phase of GB1275 monotherapy or in combination with Anti-PD-1 Antibody or in combination with Standard of Care in Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma followed by a Phase 2 Basket Expansion phase in Patients with Specified Metastatic Solid Tumors
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Metastatic or Inoperable Locally Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This is a Phase Ib / II, open-label, multicenter, randomized umbrella study evaluating the efficacy and safety of multiple immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with metastatic or inoperable locally advanced TNBC. The study will be performed in two stages. During Stage 1, two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: one cohort will consist of Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive participants who have received no prior systemic therapy for metastatic or inoperable locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (first-line [1L] PD-L1+ cohort), and one cohort will consist of participants who had disease progression during or following 1L treatment with chemotherapy (e.g., paclitaxel, nab-paclitaxel, carboplatin) and have not received cancer immunotherapy (CIT) (second-line [2L] CIT-naive cohort). In addition, participants in the 2L CIT-naive cohort who experience disease progression, loss of clinical benefit, or unacceptable toxicity during Stage 1 may be eligible to continue treatment with a different treatment combination (Stage 2), provided Stage 2 is open for enrollment.
    Location: 3 locations

  • MV-NIS or Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Ovarian, Fallopian, or Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well oncolytic measles virus encoding thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (MV-NIS) compared to investigator's choice chemotherapy works in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer. Measles virus, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Avatar-Directed Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well Avatar-directed chemotherapy works in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that does not respond to platinum anti-cancer drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, topotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Using an Avatar, a living tumor sample with similar genetic characteristics to the original tumor, may help determine which chemotherapy is most effective.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Selinexor, Gemcitabine, and Nab-Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This partially randomized phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, and to see how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as selinexor, gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Nab-paclitaxel followed by Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Pediatric Participants with Newly-Diagnostic, Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating pediatric participants with solid tumors that are newly-diagnostic, have come back, or do not respond to treatment. Nab-paclitaxel may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, or by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine hydrochloride, may work better in treating pediatric participants with solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ascorbic Acid and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to therapy (refractory). Ascorbic acid may make cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy may work better at treating lymphoma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Mirvetuximab Soravtansine and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with FRalpha-Positive Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of mirvetuximab soravtansine and gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating patients with folate receptor (FR) alpha-positive ovarian, primary peritoneal, fallopian tube, endometrial, or triple negative breast cancer that has come back. Mirvetuximab soravtansine is a monoclonal antibody, called mirvetuximab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM4. Mirvetuximab attaches to FOLR1 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM4 to kill them. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving mirvetuximab soravtansine and gemcitabine may work better in treating patients with FRalpha-positive ovarian, primary peritoneal, fallopian tube, endometrial, or triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Celecoxib, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Participants with Bladder Cancer before Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well celecoxib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and cisplatin work in treating participants with bladder cancer before surgery. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving celecoxib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and cisplatin before surgery may work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Retifanlimab with Gemcitabine and Docetaxel in Patients with Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I / II trial evaluates the effect of gemcitabine and docetaxel when given together with retifanlimab in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Gemcitabine and docetaxel are chemotherapy drugs that work by killing tumor cells and interrupting their ability to divide and reproduce. Retifanlimab is an antibody, similar to the antibodies made by the immune system to protect the body from harm. Retifanlimab blocks the protein PD-1 (programmed cell death receptor 1), which usually acts as a brake on the immune system. Blocking this protein is like releasing the brakes, so the immune system can target tumor cells and destroy them. Giving gemcitabine and docetaxel together with retifanlimab may shrink or stabilize the cancer.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Gemcitabine and Docetaxel for the Treatment of Patients with Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect of gemcitabine and docetaxel given directly into the bladder in treating patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients who have had no prior treatment with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (BCG-naive), the current standard of care. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Gemcitabine and Cisplatin with or without Devimistat as First Line Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer, BilT-04 Trial

    This phase IB / II trial investigates the side effects and best dose of devimistat and how well it works with gemcitabine and cisplatin as initial treatment (first-line therapy) for patients with biliary tract cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Devimistat may kill tumor cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by tumor cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more tumor cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, devimistat may deprive the tumor cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in the body. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving devimistat with gemcitabine and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells than giving only gemcitabine and cisplatin.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Galeterone Alone or Combined with Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Refractory Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well an investigational agent called galeterone works by itself, or in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that does not respond to standard treatment (refractory) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Galeterone may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Information from this study may help doctors learn more about galeterone and the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, which may benefit patients with the same or a similar condition in the future.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Gemcitabine and Docetaxel with Radiation Therapy before Surgery for the Treatment of High Grade and Greater than 5 cm Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremities

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine and docetaxel when given together with radiation therapy, and to see how well the combination works before surgery in treating patients with high grade soft tissue sarcoma of the upper or lower limbs (extremities) that is over 5 cm in size. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving gemcitabine, docetaxel, and radiation therapy to patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities may lead to a reduction in the size of the tumor prior to surgery. It may also lead to better surgical outcomes and / or reduce the risk of the tumor spreading to other parts of the body.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina