Clinical Trials Using Goserelin Acetate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Goserelin Acetate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-16 of 16
  • Standard Systemic Therapy with or without Definitive Treatment in Treating Participants with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase III trial studies whether the addition of definitive treatment (radiation or surgical removal) of the primary tumor to standard systemic therapy for patients with prostate cancer, may help prevent the cancer from the spreading to other parts of their body. Removing the prostate by either surgery or radiation therapy in addition to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.
    Location: 242 locations

  • Antiandrogen Therapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 238 locations

  • Nivolumab, Docetaxel, and Androgen Deprivation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic, Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer with DNA Damage Repair Defects or Inflamed Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, docetaxel, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) work in treating patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage repair defects or inflamed tumors that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Testosterone can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. ADT, or hormonal therapy, may help fight prostate cancer by cutting off the supply of testosterone. Nivolumab is an antibody (a type of human protein) that works by stimulating the body’s immune system to recognize and fight cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy may make cancer cells more recognizable to the immune system, and make cancer cells more susceptible to nivolumab immunotherapy. The purpose of this study is to examine the activity and safety of hormonal therapy combined with docetaxel chemotherapy and nivolumab immunotherapy for patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study of Salvage Radiotherapy With or Without Enzalutamide in Recurrent Prostate Cancer Following Surgery

    Patients with post-prostatectomy PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) recurrences with aggressive disease features will receive salvage radiation therapy and standard androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or enhanced ADT to determine if there is any improvement in progression-free survival when enhanced ADT is used compared to standard ADT.
    Location: 7 locations

  • PD 0332991 and Anastrozole for Stage 2 or 3 Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies palbociclib isethionate together with anastrozole and to see how well they work in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) stage II or III breast cancer. Palbociclib isethionate may stop tumor growth by blocking an enzyme needed for cell division and growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using anastrozole may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Giving palbociclib isethionate together with anastrozole may be an effective treatment for ER+ HER2- breast cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Goserelin Acetate and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Androgen-Receptor Positive Salivary Gland Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well goserelin acetate and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with androgen-receptor positive salivary gland cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Many salivary gland tumors need hormones (called androgens) to grow. Goserelin acetate blocks the androgen receptors on tumor cells and may cause them to stop growing or die. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving goserelin acetate and pembrolizumab together may work better in treating patients with androgen-receptor positive salivary gland cancer compared to giving either drug on its own.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Testosterone Therapy Followed by Enzalutamide or Abiraterone Acetate in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Is Progressing on Combined Androgen Therapies

    This phase II trial studies how well testosterone therapy followed by enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has become worse or spread on combined androgen therapies. Androgens, such as testosterone, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen therapies, such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, suppress or block the production or action of testosterone. Rapid treatment with testosterone may make the cancer cells become sensitive to retreatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate. Giving testosterone prior to enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate may have an effect on the growth of prostate cancer in men who have not responded to long term therapy to lower testosterone in their blood (castrating therapy).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Palbociclib, Bosutinib, and Fulvestrant for the Treatment of Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Refractory to Aromatase Inhibitors

    This trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosutinib and palbociclib when given together with fulvestrant in treating patients with hormone receptor positive and HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and does not respond to aromatase inhibitor therapy (refractory to aromatase inhibitors). Bosutinib and palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. This study is being done because it is not known if this combination therapy can be safely used at effective doses, preventing or postponing the need to start treatment with chemotherapy.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Fulvestrant and Abemaciclib in Treating Patients with Stage III- IV Low Grade Serous Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well fulvestrant and abemaciclib work in treating patients with stage III-IV low grade serous ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Fulvestrant and abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride, Hormone Therapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase 2 trial studies radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Radium Ra 223 dichloride contains a radioactive substance that collects in the bone and gives off radiation that may kill cancer cells. Hormone therapy using leuprolide acetate or goserelin acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation may work better at treating prostate cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Apalutamide with or without Abiraterone Acetate, Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well apalutamide works with or without abiraterone acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, and prednisone in treating patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH agonist) may fight prostate cancer by lowering the levels of androgen the body makes. Prednisone may either kill the tumor cells or stop them from dividing. Giving apalutamide with or without abiraterone acetate, GnRH agonist and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • High-Dose Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well high-dose brachytherapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body. Brachytherapy is a type of radiation therapy in which radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters is placed directly into or near a tumor and may be a better treatment in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and hormone therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer. Specialized radiation therapy, such as IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgen hormones can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells and antihormone therapy drugs, such as leuprolide acetate, goserelin acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving IMRT with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and androgen deprivation therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • CASPAR, A Clinical Study Evaluating The Benefit of Adding Rucaparib to Enzalutamide for Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer That Has Become Resistant To Testosterone-Deprivation Therapy

    This phase III trial compares the addition of rucaparib to enzalutamide with enzalutamide alone for the treatment of men with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and has become resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays role in prostate cancer development. Enzalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells for growth. PARPs are proteins that help repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as rucaparib, can keep PARPs from working , so tumor cells can't repair themselves. This may stop tumor cells from growing. Giving enzalutamide and rucaparib may prolong patients’ survival and / or prevent their cancer from growing or spreading for a longer time. It may also help doctors learn if a mutation in any of the specific DNA repair (homologous recombination) genes is helpful in selecting the most appropriate treatment for the patient.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Treating Prostate Cancer That Has Come Back after Surgery with Apalutamide and Targeted Radiation Using PET / CT Imaging

    This phase III trial compares the addition of apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment versus standard of care treatment alone in patients with prostate cancer biochemical recurrence (a rise in the blood level of prostate-specific antigen [PSA] after treatment with surgery or radiation). Diagnostic procedures, such as positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT), may help doctors look for cancer that has spread to the pelvis. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgens by the tumor cells. Targeted radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors that have spread. This trial may help doctors determine if using PET / CT results to deliver more tailored treatment (i.e., adding apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment) works better than standard of care treatment alone in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.