Clinical Trials Using Hydroxychloroquine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Hydroxychloroquine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • Dabrafenib, Trametinib and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with Stage IV Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine when given together with dabrafenib and trametinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IV melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. Dabrafenib and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Sometimes when dabrafenib and trametinib are given, the tumor cells activate a stress response called autophagy. Autophagy provides resistance to dabrafenib and trametinib treatment over time making them less effective. Giving hydroxychloroquine with dabrafenib and trametinib may reduce drug resistance and allow more tumor cells to be killed.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Baricitinib, Placebo and Antiviral Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Moderate and Severe COVID-19

    This phase II trial studies the effect of baricitinib in combination with antiviral therapy for the treatment of patients with moderate or severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Treatment with antiviral medications such as hydroxychloroquine, lopinavir / ritonavir, and / or remdesivir may act against infection caused by the virus responsible for COVID-19. Baricitinib may reduce lung inflammation. Giving baricitinib in combination with antiviral therapy may reduce the risk of the disease from getting worse and may help prevent the need for being placed on a ventilator should the disease worsen compared to antiviral therapy alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Binimetinib and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with KRAS Mutant Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of hydroxychloroquine when given together with binimetinib in treating patients with KRAS gene mutated pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hydroxychloroquine may prevent autophagy, a normal process in which a cell destroys proteins and other substances which may lead to cell death. Autophagy may prevent normal cells from developing into tumor cells, but it may also protect tumor cells by destroying anticancer drugs or substances taken up by them. Giving hydroxychloroquine together with binimetinib may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to binimetinib alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Hydroxychloroquine for the Treatment of Recurrent, Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well hydroxychloroquine works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has come back (recurrent) and has spread to a limited number of sites (oligometastatic). PAR-4 is a protein that causes cell death in cancer cells, but the amount of it made by normal cells is not enough to cause massive cancer cell death. Hydroxychloroquine may increase PAR-4 levels which helps kill more cancer cells.
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • Trametinib and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the sides effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine when given together with trametinib in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as hydroxychloroquine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trametinib together with hydroxychloroquine may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Hydroxychloroquine, Palbociclib, and Letrozole before Surgery in Treating Participants with Estrogen Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine when given together with palbociclib and letrozole before surgery in treating participants with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer. Hydroxychloroquine is a substance that decreases immune responses in the body. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving hydroxychloroquine, palbociclib, and letrozole before surgery may work better than palbociclib and letrozole in treating participants with breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gemcitabine, Docetaxel, and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine and how well it works when given together with gemcitabine and docetaxel in treating participants with osteosarcoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, docetaxel, and hydroxychloroquine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CPI-613 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with Recurrent High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine and how well CPI-613 and hydroxychloroquine work in treating patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back after hypomethylating therapy. CPI-613 is thought to kill cancer cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, CPI-613 deprives the cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in your body. Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial drug. Hydroxychloroquine may make CPI-613 more effective in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Hydroxychloroquine versus Placebo to Prevent COVID-19 Infection in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well hydroxychloroquine works in preventing infection with the COVID-19 virus in patients receiving radiation therapy. Hydroxychloroquine has been approved for the prevention and treatment of malaria, and the treatment of lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Receiving radiation therapy may increase the risk of infection with the COVID-19 virus because the patients are in frequent and close contact with healthcare workers and with other patients who may have become infected. Patients receiving treatment for cancer may also have weakened immune system. Giving hydroxychloroquine may help prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2 in patients who are receiving radiation therapy for their cancer.
    Location: 7 locations