Clinical Trials Using Ibrutinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Ibrutinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-70 of 70

  • Ibrutinib in Treating Participants with Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works in treating participants with early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Obinutuzumab and Ibrutinib as Front Line Therapy in Treating Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    This phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab and ibrutinib work as front line therapy in treating patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving obinutuzumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ibrutinib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects of ibrutinib and pembrolizumab and how well they work in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Venetoclax and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax and ibrutinib work in treating patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of ibrutinib when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • TLR9 Agonist SD-101, Ibrutinib, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Grade 1-3A Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist SD-101 when given together with ibrutinib and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with grade 1-3a follicular lymphoma that has come back after a period of improvement or no longer responds to treatment. Immunostimulants such as TLR9 agonist SD-101 may increase the ability of the immune system to fight infection and disease. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving TLR9 agonist SD-101 with ibrutinib and radiation therapy may induce an immune response and prolong anti-tumor response.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Obinutuzumab in Combination with Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab works in combination with ibrutinib in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Obinutuzumab binds to a protein called cluster of differentiation (CD)20, which is found on B cells and some types of leukemia and lymphoma cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Ibrutinib blocks a protein called Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), which may help keep cancer cells from growing. Giving obinutuzumab in combination with ibrutinib may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Ibrutinib Given before Surgery in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of ibrutinib and to see how well it works when given before surgery, in treating patients with prostate cancer. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Ibrutinib, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Obinutuzumab in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and obinutuzumab work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and obinutuzumab together may work better in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab Alone or with Idelalisib or Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Other Low-Grade B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab alone or with idelalisib or ibrutinib works in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or have not responded to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Idelalisib and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab alone or with idelalisib or ibrutinib may be an effective treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Selinexor and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with ibrutinib in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Selinexor and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of BTK Inhibitor LOXO-305 Versus Approved BTK Inhibitor Drugs in Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL)

    This is a study for participants with a type of blood cancer called mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The main purpose is to compare LOXO-305 to other drugs that work in a similar way that have already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA). Participation could last up to two years, and possibly longer, if the disease does not progress.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Extended Treatment Protocol for Subjects Continuing to Benefit From Ibrutinib.

    Multicenter, open-label, prospective treatment protocol that provides continued access to ibrutinib to subjects who have completed parent ibrutinib studies, are still benefitting from treatment with ibrutinib, and have no access to commercial ibrutinib for their underlying disease within their region.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Long-term Extension Study of PCI-32765 (Ibrutinib)

    The purpose of this study is to collect long-term safety and efficacy data for participants treated with PCI-32765 (Ibrutinib) and to provide ongoing access to PCI-32765 for participants who are currently enrolled in PCI-32765 studies that have been completed according to the parent protocol, are actively receiving treatment with PCI-32765, and who continue to benefit from PCI-32765 treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Venetoclax, Ibrutinib, Prednisone, Obinutuzumab, and Revlimid in Combination With Polatuzumab (ViPOR-P) in Relapsed / Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: Aggressive B-cell lymphomas can be cured but people with disease that resists treatment or that returns after treatment have poor outcomes with standard therapies. Indolent B-cell lymphomas are generally incurable with standard therapy and treatment is aimed at controlling symptoms and achieving a durable remissions. Researchers want to see if a combination of drugs can help patients with both aggressive and indolent B-cell lymphomas. Objective: To learn if it is safe and effective to give polatuzumab along with venetoclax, ibrutinib, prednisone, obinutuzumab, and lenalidomide to people with certain B-cell lymphomas. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with relapsed and / or refractory B-cell lymphoma who have had at least one prior cancer treatment. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Assessment of how they do their daily activities Blood and urine tests Heart function test Tissue biopsy (if needed) Body imaging scans (may get a contrast agent through an intravenous (IV) catheter) Participants will have a bone marrow aspiration and / or biopsy. A needle will be put into the hipbone. Bone marrow will be removed. Participants may give blood, tissue, saliva, or cheek swab samples. They may have optional biopsies. Screening tests will be repeated during the study. Treatment will be given for up to 6 cycles. Each cycle lasts 21 days. Participants will take venetoclax and prednisone tablets by mouth. They will take ibrutinib and lenalidomide capsules by mouth. They will get obinutuzumab and polatuzumab by IV infusion. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will visit the clinic 30 days after treatment ends. They will have follow-up visits for 5 years. If needed, they can visit their local doctor instead. They may be contacted by phone, mail, etc., for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Testing the Addition of a New Drug, Venetoclax, to the Usual Treatment (Ibrutinib and Rituximab) for Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia / Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the effects of ibrutinib and rituximab with or without venetoclax in treating patients with previously untreated Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia / lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Giving venetoclax with ibrutinib and rituximab with may work better in treating patients with previously untreated Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia than ibrutinib and rituximab alone.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Ibrutinib for the Treatment of Patients with B-Cell Malignancies Who Are Infected with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

    This phase II trial studies the effect of ibrutinib in treating patients with B-cell malignancies who are infected with the virus responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Ibrutinib blocks a protein called Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), which may help keep cancer cells from growing. The goals of this study are twofold: a) to conduct a prospective observational cohort study to determine the risk of hospitalization among patients on ibrutinib therapy with COVID-19 infection in the outpatient setting (ibrutinib may be continued or not per investigator’s choice); and b) to randomly assign hospitalized patients who are on ibrutinib therapy for a hematologic malignancy and who develop COVID-19 infection to either stop ibrutinib or continue with the drug.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Ibrutinib for the Treatment of COVID-19 in Patients Requiring Hospitalization

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib and how well it works in treating patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Ibrutinib may help improve COVID-19 symptoms by lessening the inflammatory response in the lungs, while preserving overall immune function. This may reduce the need to be on a ventilator to help with breathing.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Study of Selinexor in Combination With Backbone Treatments or Novel Therapies In Participants With Relapsed or Refractory (RR) Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, multicenter, open-label study to evaluate the efficacy, and safety of various combinations with selinexor in participants with RR DLBCL. The study will be conducted in two phases: Phase 1 and 2. The Phase 1 of the study will be a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD), recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) for each treatment arm, and assess the dose limiting toxicities (DLTs). The Phase 2 of the study will be a dose expansion study to assess the efficacy and safety of for RP2D selected at the end of Phase 1 of the study for each treatment arm.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ibrutinib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma Ineligible for Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of ibrutinib when given together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone and how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that are not eligible for transplant. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida