Clinical Trials Using Imatinib Mesylate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Imatinib Mesylate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-8 of 8
  • Testing Pembrolizumab with Existing Cancer Therapy in Patients with Evidence of Residual Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and persistent detection of minimal residual disease, defined as the levels of a gene product called bcr-abl in the blood. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, and bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared to dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib alone.
    Location: 234 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 168 locations

  • A Phase I Study of Oral ABL001 in Patients With CML or Ph+ ALL

    The design of a phase I, open label, dose finding study was chosen in order to establish a safe and tolerated dose of single agent ABL001 in CML and Ph+ ALL patients who are relapsed or refractory to or are intolerant of TKIs, and of ABL001+Nilotinib, ABL001+Imatinib and ABL001+Dasatinib in Ph positive CML patients who are relapsed or refractory to TKIs.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Imatinib for the Treatment of COVID-19 in Hospitalized Adults

    This phase III trial compares imatinib with placebo in treating hospitalized adults with COVID-19 infection. Imatinib is an enzyme inhibitor and may have some antiviral activities. This trial aims to see whether adding imatinib to the best conventional care may help improve outcomes of hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19 infection.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Binimetinib and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients with Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of binimetinib when given together with imatinib mesylate and to see how well they work in treating patients with untreated gastrointestinal stromal tumors that have spread from where they started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or to other places in the body (advanced). Binimetinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Ipilimumab and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab and imatinib mesylate in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ipilimumab and imatinib mesylate may work better in treating patients with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations