Clinical Trials Using Indocyanine Green Solution

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Indocyanine Green Solution. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • Spectrum Near-Infrared Imaging with Indocyanine Green in Assessing Circulation around Surgical Incisions in Patients Undergoing Laparotomy

    This pilot trial studies how well spectrum near-infrared imaging with indocyanine green works in assessing circulation around surgical incisions in patients undergoing laparotomy. Spectrum near-infrared imaging uses a camera that produces a special type of light that helps surgeons see things during surgery that are difficult to see with the naked eye. Indocyanine green, a dye that is used with near-infrared imaging, allows surgeons to see blood flow to parts of the body during and after surgery. Diagnostic procedures, such as spectrum near-infrared imaging with indocyanine green, may help measure blood flow around an incision before and after the surgeon closes the incision with staples or sutures.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Near-Infrared Image Guided Surgical Resection with Indocyanine Green in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of near-infrared image guided surgical resection with indocyanine green in treating patients with head and neck cancer. Near-infrared image guided surgical resection with indocyanine green may make it easier to find and remove tumors.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Individualized Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    This pilot clinical trial studies individualized adaptive radiation therapy (RT) in treating patients with liver (hepatocellular) carcinoma. RT uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Individualized adaptive RT involves assessing patients' liver function before and during RT to determine how well the liver is working and how much RT treatment patients need to receive. To assess liver function, patients undergo a blood test using an injected dye called indocyanine green solution and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Perfusion MRI also uses an injected dye in order to see blood flow through tissues, such as in the liver. Customizing RT to what the liver can safely tolerate and how much of tumor needs to be killed may be a better treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Indocyanine Green Lymphangiography in Identifying Thoracic Duct during Neck Surgery

    This phase I trial studies how well indocyanine green lymphangiography works in identifying thoracic duct during neck surgery. Diagnostic procedures, such as near infrared fluorescence imaging with indocyanine green may help recognize and prevent injury to thoracic duct during neck surgery.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging in Identifying Lymph Nodes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Biopsy

    This phase I clinical trial studies how well near-infrared fluorescence imaging works in identifying lymph nodes in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing biopsy. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging may help surgeons identify the lymph nodes in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing a standard biopsy procedure.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Indocyanine Green and Technetium Tc 99m in Identifying Lymph Nodes in Pediatric Patients with Solid Tumors Undergoing Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    This clinical trial studies how well indocyanine green works compared to technetium Tc 99m in identifying lymph nodes in pediatric patients with solid tumors undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green is a fluorescent dye that glows when a special light shines on it. Technetium Tc 99m is a radioactive dye to help find the lymph nodes so they can be removed. Indocyanine green may work better in detecting lymph nodes closest to tumors in pediatric patients.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Integrated Imaging System in Detecting Fluorescently Labeled Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Patients with Breast Tumor

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well an integrated imaging system works in detecting fluorescently labeled sentinel lymph nodes in patients with breast tumor. Integrated imaging system may be as good as or better than current technology used to identify the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Indocyanine Green Solution in Identifying Central Nervous System Tumors During Image-Guided Surgery

    This pilot phase I / II trial studies the best way to give indocyanine green solution and to see how well it works in identifying tumors in the brain or spine during image-guided surgery. Detecting indocyanine green solution by using a hand-held light source and camera system may be a useful tool to identify central nervous system tumors from normal tissue.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Cancer Surgery Registry of Patients with Solid Tumors Undergoing Surgery with or without Intraoperative Imaging

    This research trial collects medical information from patients with solid tumors undergoing surgery with or without imaging during surgery (intraoperative imaging) to create a cancer databased called the Cancer Surgery Registry. Recording patients’ medical data, any side effects or toxicities, and outcomes over time may help predict if a patient is more likely to experience cancer recurrence (cancer that comes back) after surgery. Intraoperative imaging enables researchers to record what tissues fluoresce in the operating room and help identify if these lesions are cancer.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania