Clinical Trials Using Iobenguane I-131

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Iobenguane I-131. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: 135 locations

  • MIBG With Dinutuximab

    131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) is one of the most effective therapies utilized for neuroblastoma patients with refractory or relapsed disease. In this pediatric phase 1 trial, 131I-MIBG will be given in combination with dinutuximab, a chimeric 14.18 monoclonal antibody. This study will utilize a traditional Phase I dose escalation 3+3 design to determine a recommended phase 2 pediatric dose. An expansion cohort of an additional 6 patients may then be enrolled.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Non-neuroblastic Iobenguane Avid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well iobenguane I-131 works in treating patients with neuroblastoma or non-neuroblastic iobenguane avid tumors that has come back after a period of improvement or that does not respond to treatment. Iobenguane I-131 may help deliver radiation to the tumor cells and cause them to die.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent Neuroblastoma, Malignant Pheochromocytoma, or Malignant Paraganglioma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of targeted radiation therapy with iobenguane I-131 and to see how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or has not responded to treatment, or pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other places in the body. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Metaiodobenzylguanidine-Labeled Positron Emission Tomography / Computed Tomography in Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    The research is being done because metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a chemical that has been used in many children to image their neuroblastoma. MIBG molecules can be put together with radioactive iodine (124I) in the laboratory to make radioactive 124I-MIBG (iodine I 124 metaiodobenzylguanidine). When children are given 124I-MIBG, it can be seen in their body after doing a positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) scan. PET / CT scans may allow researchers to image, or see, the tumors and different tissues / organs with a more precise outline than the standard 123I-MIBG scan. Researchers want to find out more information about using 124I-MIBG to see tumors and organs by using a PET / CT scan.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California