Clinical Trials Using Lenvatinib Mesylate

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Lenvatinib Mesylate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Lenvatinib / Everolimus or Lenvatinib / Pembrolizumab Versus Sunitinib Alone as Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase 3 study to compare the efficacy and safety of lenvatinib in combination with everolimus (Arm A) or pembrolizumab (Arm B) versus sunitinib (Arm C) as first-line treatment in participants with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Phase 2 Trial to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Lenvatinib in Combination With Everolimus in Subjects With Unresectable Advanced or Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (nccRCC) Who Have Not Received Any Chemotherapy for Advanced Disease

    This is a single-arm, multicenter, Phase 2 study of lenvatinib in combination with everolimus in participants with unresectable advanced or metastatic non clear cell renal cell carcinoma (nccRCC) who have not received any chemotherapy for advanced disease. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the objective response rate (ORR). This study consists of three phases: a Pretreatment Phase (Screening and Baseline Periods), a Treatment Phase (starting Cycle 1, Day 1), and a Posttreatment Phase (End of Treatment Visit and survival Follow-up).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Lenvatinib Mesylate and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well lenvatinib mesylate works with pembrolizumab in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer that has spread to other places in the body or has come back. Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving lenvatinib mesylate and pembrolizumab may work better at treating at gastric or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Capecitabine, Lenvatinib Mesylate, and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer before Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of capecitabine when given together with lenvatinib mesylate and external beam radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving capecitabine, lenvatinib mesylate, and external beam radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Lenvatinib Mesylate and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Recurrent Endometrial, Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenvatinib mesylate when given together with paclitaxel in treating patients with endometrial, ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back or grown. Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking a protein needed for cell growth and may block the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenvatinib mesylate and paclitaxel together may work better in treating patients with endometrial, ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio