Clinical Trials Using Melphalan

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Melphalan. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 74
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  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 235 locations

  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: 126 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, Daratumumab, Melphalan, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving carfilzomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone, daratumumab, melphalan, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Dinutuximab, Sargramostim, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well dinutuximab and sargramostim work with combination chemotherapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sargramostim helps the body produce normal infection-fighting white blood cells. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant, with drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, melphalan, etoposide, carboplatin, topotecan, and isotretinoin, helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in a patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells). Giving dinutuximab and sargramostim with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Tisagenlecleucel in Adult Patients With Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This is a randomized, open label, multicenter phase III trial comparing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of tisagenlecleucel to Standard Of Care in adult patients with aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma after failure of rituximab and anthracycline containing frontline immunochemotherapy.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion in Patients With Hepatic-dominant Ocular Melanoma

    This study will evaluate patients who have melanoma that has spread from the eye to the liver: Patients in the study will be treated with Melphalan / HDS up to 6 total treatment, and will be followed until death. This study will evaluate the safety and effects of the treatment on how long patients live and how long it takes for the cancer to advance or respond to the treatment.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called “anti-HIV genes” are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Subcutaneous Daratumumab in Combination With Standard Multiple Myeloma Treatment Regimens

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical benefit of subcutaneous (SC) daratumumab administered in combination with standard multiple myeloma (MM) regimens in participants with MM as measured by overall response rate (ORR) or very good partial response (VGPR) or better rate.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate before and after stem cell transplant works in treating patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Tadalafil and Lenalidomide with or without Activated Marrow Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well tadalafil and lenalidomide with or without activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes work in treating patients with multiple myeloma undergoing stem cell transplant. Activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes are blood and bone marrow cells that are stimulated to react to certain proteins and may help to target and kill cancer cells. Tadalafil may increase the possibility of trafficking activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes to the cancer site. Lenalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. It is not yet known whether giving tadalafil and lenalidomide is more effective with or without activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Neurologic Autoimmune Diseases

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient’s own immune system ‘attacks’ the nervous system which might include the brain / spinal cord and / or the peripheral nerves. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, including carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant weakens the immune system and may help stop the immune system from ‘attacking’ a patient's nervous system. When the patient’s own (autologous) stem cells are infused into the patient they help the bone marrow make red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets so the blood counts can improve.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Giving Chemotherapy and rATG for a Shortened Amount of Time before a Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of giving chemotherapy and a drug called rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancers. This study will also look at whether the condensed regimen can shorten hospitalization following the transplantation. A chemotherapy regimen with the drugs busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine may kill cancer cells in the body, making room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow and reducing the chance of transplanted cell rejection. The chemotherapy drugs work to interrupt the DNA (genetic information) in the cancer cells, stopping the cells from dividing and causing them to die. rATG targets and deactivates white blood cells called T cells that survive the chemotherapy. T cells may see the donor’s cells as foreign, causing a serious condition called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). rATG helps prevent the donor stem cells from being rejected. Giving chemotherapy and rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplantation may help in reducing the number of side effects and shortening hospitalization following the transplantation.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • CSL200 Gene Therapy in Adults With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    This is a phase 1 pilot study of CSL200 in adult subjects with severe sickle cell disease. The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety of the following: collection of CD34+ hematopoietic stem / progenitor cells by apheresis after mobilization with plerixafor, reduced intensity conditioning with melphalan, and administration of CSL200.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    The goal of this phase II clinical study is to learn about the safety of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with fludarabine, with or without bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab before and after a stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to learn if inotuzumab ozogamicin when given after a stem cell transplant can help control leukemia and lymphoma. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22-positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving chemotherapy before a bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor attack the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and filgrastim before or after the transplant may stop this from happening. Fludarabine, bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab are commonly given before stem cell transplants. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplantation.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Stem Cell Transplant with Chemotherapy and Selected Use of Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well transplanting blood cells with chemotherapy work in treating patients with a high risk blood cancer that is in remission. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells and cancer cells. It may also help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving filgrastim may stop this from happening. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving stem cells with chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with blood cancer.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies donor T cell depletion in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Donor stem cell transplants, especially in the mismatched donor setting, are associated with increased risk for GVHD, a condition where the transplanted donor white blood cells attack your body’s normal tissues. Using a cell separation device may remove a subset of white blood cells (called alpha / beta T cells) from the donor product before the product is transplanted. This study is being done to assess whether this manipulation (called selective T cell depletion) will reduce the risk of GVHD and improve transplant outcome.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Genetically engineered cells (NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered T cells and HSCs) after Melphalan Conditioning Regimen in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) engineered T cells and how well they work with NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) after melphalan conditioning regimen in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). The melphalan conditioning chemotherapy makes room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood cells and blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR T cells and stem cells after the conditioning chemotherapy is intended to replace the immune system with new immune cells that have been redirected to attack and kill the cancer cells and thereby improve immune system function against cancer. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered T cells and HSCs after melphalan may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Laboratory Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Product (Spanlecortemlocel) in Treating Patients with High-Risk Blood Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how the transplantation of laboratory expanded cord blood, called spanlecortemlocel, works in treating patients with high-risk blood cancers. Umbilical cord blood transplantation has been primarily used in patients with blood cancers. However, the blood counts are slower to recover after this type of transplantation, which can result in a longer hospital stays and a greater number of transfusions. To speed up blood count recovery, the number of blood forming stem cells can be multiplied more than 300 times on average in the laboratory prior to transfusion. Using spanlecortemlocel may speed up blood count recovery in patients with high-risk blood cancers.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Alpha Beta T-cells and CD19 B-cells Depleted Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Non-Malignant Blood and Immune Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well alpha beta T-cells and CD19 B-cells depleted stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood and immune disorders. Donor stem cell transplants contain kinds of white blood cells called T-cells and B-cells along with all the blood-forming cells that make up a healthy immune system. Sometimes donor stem cells are referred to as the "graft" and the patient receiving the "graft" is called the "host." Graft versus host disease (GVHD) and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) are side effects that can occur after transplantation. Removing alpha-beta T cells and CD19 B-cells from donor cells may help diminish these complications.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant using Alpha / Beta+ T-Cell Depletion in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of donor stem cell transplant using allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (alpha / beta positive [+] T-cell depletion) in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • High Dose Ascorbic Acid and Low Dose Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of high dose ascorbic acid when given together with low dose melphalan in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back and does not respond to treatment. High doses of ascorbic acid may kill the cancer cells (myeloma cells in the bone marrow), while preserving normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving high dose ascorbic acid and low dose melphalan may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma compared to low dose melphalan without high dose ascorbic acid.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Venetoclax, Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, and Melphalan before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan before stem cell transplant in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • TCR Genetically Engineered PBMC and PBSC after Melphalan Conditioning Regimen in Treating Participants with Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after melphalan conditioning regimen in treating participants with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. The melphalan conditioning chemotherapy makes room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood cells (PBMC) and blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR PBMC and stem cells after the conditioning chemotherapy is intended to replace the immune system with new immune cells that have been redirected to attack and kill the cancer cells and thereby improve immune system function against cancer. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR PBMC and PBSC after melphalan may work better at treating multiple myeloma.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation, Fludarabine, and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I studies the side effects and best dose of total marrow and lymphoid irradiation when given together with fludarabine and melphalan before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and melphalan, and total marrow and lymphoid irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California


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