Clinical Trials Using Melphalan Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Melphalan Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-10 of 10
  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: 126 locations

  • Giving Chemotherapy and rATG for a Shortened Amount of Time before a Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of giving chemotherapy and a drug called rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancers. This study will also look at whether the condensed regimen can shorten hospitalization following the transplantation. A chemotherapy regimen with the drugs busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine may kill cancer cells in the body, making room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow and reducing the chance of transplanted cell rejection. The chemotherapy drugs work to interrupt the DNA (genetic information) in the cancer cells, stopping the cells from dividing and causing them to die. rATG targets and deactivates white blood cells called T cells that survive the chemotherapy. T cells may see the donor’s cells as foreign, causing a serious condition called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). rATG helps prevent the donor stem cells from being rejected. Giving chemotherapy and rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplantation may help in reducing the number of side effects and shortening hospitalization following the transplantation.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Hematologic Malignancies or Myelodysplasia

    This phase I / II trial studies how well stem cell transplant from partially matched related donors works in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or myelodysplasia. Donor stem cell transplant is a procedure in which a patient receives blood-forming stem cells (cells from which all blood cells develop) from a genetically similar, but not identical, donor. Ideally, patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant receive a stem cell graft from a matched sibling; however, less than 30% of patients will have such a donor. There is a high likelihood of being unable to identify a perfect matched unrelated donor. Stem cell transplant from a partially matched related donor may result in result in successful engraftment and rapid immune rebuilding while maintaining a low risk of graft versus host disease.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Participants with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan hydrochloride in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplantation. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplantation helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving melphalan hydrochloride before a donor stem cell transplantation may work better than standard chemotherapy in helping to prevent multiple myeloma from coming back.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Thiotepa, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in treating patients with blood cancer who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Heated Chemotherapy Solution (Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy) Using Mitomycin-C or Melphalan in Treating Patients with Colorectal Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy using mitomycin-C or melphalan works in treating patients with tumors that develop in the lining of the abdomen (peritoneal carcinomatosis) due to colorectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin-C and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving heated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen during surgery may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors see if one of the chemotherapy drugs (mitomycin-C or melphalan) is safer or more effective than the other in helping patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis live longer.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Early Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This clinical trial studies how well early stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Early stem cell transplantation may result in more successful treatment for patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Vorinostat in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Undergoing Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat in preventing graft versus host disease in children, adolescents, and young adults who are undergoing unrelated donor blood and bone marrow transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells, called graft-versus-host disease. During this process, chemicals (called cytokines) are released that may damage certain body tissues, including the gut, liver and skin. Vorinostat may be an effective treatment for graft-versus-host disease caused by a bone marrow transplant.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide work in reducing rates of graft versus host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California