Clinical Trials Using Melphalan

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Melphalan. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 73

  • Rituximab, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Melphalan and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Elderly Participants with Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of rituximab, bendamustine hydrochloride and melphalan and how well they work in treating elderly participants with B-cell Lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment before undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Daratumumab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab after a stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may kill cancer cells that are left after chemotherapy.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Olaparib and High-Dose Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphomas Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib when given together with high-dose chemotherapy in treating patients with lymphomas that have come back or does not treatment and are undergoing stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as olaparib, vorinostat, gemcitabine, busulfan, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving olaparib and high-dose chemotherapy together may work better in treating patients with relapsed / refractory lymphomas undergoing stem cell transplant than with chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy with or without Total Body Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy, such as total body irradiation, uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with secondary myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion vs. Cisplatin / Gemcitabine in Patients With Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    This study will evaluate two groups of patients who have intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Each group will receive induction treatment with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine per SOC for 4 treatment cycles. Following induction treatment patients will be randomize (1:1), to 2 arms of treatment. One group (50%) will be receive high dose chemotherapy delivered specifically to the liver, while the other group (50%) will continue treatment with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine. Patient in each group will get repeating cycles of treatment until the cancer advances. All patients will be followed until death. This study will compare the overall survival (OS) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Heated Chemotherapy Solution (Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy) Using Mitomycin-C or Melphalan in Treating Patients with Colorectal Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy using mitomycin-C or melphalan works in treating patients with tumors that develop in the lining of the abdomen (peritoneal carcinomatosis) due to colorectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin-C and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving heated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen during surgery may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors see if one of the chemotherapy drugs (mitomycin-C or melphalan) is safer or more effective than the other in helping patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis live longer.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Blinatumomab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma or Transformed Large Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well blinatumomab works after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or transformed large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells and improve response to the transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Umbilical Cord Blood NK Cells, Rituximab, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (umbilical cord blood natural killer [NK] cells), rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immune system cells, such as cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, are made by the body to attack foreign or cancerous cells. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, lenalidomide, melphalan, and rituximab, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A stem cell transplant using stem cells from the patient or a donor may be able to replace blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill cancer cells. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide and Bendamustine after Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Preventing GVHD in Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine when given together with cyclophosphamide after donor bone marrow transplant and to see how well they work in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving bendamustine and cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Banner University Medical Center - Tucson, Tucson, Arizona

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity conditioning (a short course of chemotherapy) and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving reduced intensity conditioning and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells with shorter recovery and fewer side effects.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Engineered Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of engineered donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Using T cells specially selected from donor blood in the laboratory for transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Chemotherapy Given before and after Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelofibrosis

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate when given together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Partially HLA-Mismatched Related Donor Stem Cell Transplant Using Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Based Donor Selection in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor stem cell transplant using killer immunoglobulin receptor or HLA based donor selection works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Partially mismatched donor stem cells may reduce the risk of cancer recurring after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Selinexor, High-Dose Melphalan, and Dexamethasone before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor and how well it works when given together with high-dose melphalan and dexamethasone before stem cell transplant in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Selinexor may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving chemotherapy, such as melphalan and dexamethasone, before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving selinexor, high-dose melphalan, and dexamethasone before stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Early Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This clinical trial studies how well early stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Early stem cell transplantation may result in more successful treatment for patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Myeloablative or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen in Treating Patients with High-Risk, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well a myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is high-risk, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy (myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus or cyclosporine after the transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens given before the transplant will work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Panobinostat, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Busulfan, and Melphalan before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, gemcitabine hydrochloride, busulfan, and melphalan before stem cell transplant work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment (refractory) or has returned (relapsed). Panobinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, busulfan, and melphalan, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Previously collected stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Yttrium Y 90 Basiliximab and Combination Chemotherapy before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Mature T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of yttrium Y 90 basiliximab when given together with standard combination chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant in treating patients with mature T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Radioactive substances linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 basiliximab, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, and melphalan (BEAM), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving yttrium Y 90 basiliximab and chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant may help kill any cancer cells that are in the body and help make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Stem cells that were collected from the patient's blood and stored before treatment are later returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Intensity Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed Hematologic Cancers Undergoing a Second or above Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan in treating patients with cancers of the blood (hematologic) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) undergoing a second or above donor stem cell transplant. IMTMI is a type of radiation therapy to the bone marrow that may be less toxic and may also reduce the chances of cancer to return. Giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and IMTMI before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois